Canada

Domestic status :

Country report(s) :

Login
(to save your search)




Last searches

No last search found

CAN20070713A Dell Computer Corp v Union des consommateurs
  • General
  • Summary
  • Original text (English)
  • Original text (French)
Serial # CAN20070713A Date July 13th, 2007 Country Canada Court Supreme Court (Canada) Party name(s) Dell Computer Corp v Union des consommateurs International or domestic case Domestic Seat of arbitration United States Arbitration rules Other Citation 2007 SCC 34, [2007] 2 SCR 801 History -2006 CanLII 1113 (SCC) (Application for leave, Supreme Court of Canada)
-2005 QCCA 570
Nature of application Referral to arbitration/stay application (art. 8) Nature of Model Law application (if not based on ML) Key questions 1. Does the presence of an arbitration clause inject a 'foreign element' into a dispute thereby giving Quebec courts jurisdiction pursuant to Article 3149 of the Quebec Civil Code?

2. Does an arbitrator or court of law have jurisdiction to first rule on the validity and applicability of an arbitration agreement?
Result Court referred parties to arbitration. Key propositions 1. "If the challenge [to a referral to arbitration] requires the production and review of factual evidence, the court should normally refer the case to arbitration, as arbitrators have, for this purpose, the same resources and expertise as courts. Where questions of mixed law and fact are concerned, the court hearing the referral application must refer the case to arbitration unless the questions of fact require only superficial consideration of the documentary evidence in the record".

2. Because jurisdictional objections should generally be first dealt with by the arbitral tribunal, a judge seized of a motion seeking to refer an action to arbitration should normally refrain from reviewing the arbitration agreement's effectiveness unless a question solely of law is at issue.

3. Arbitration is a legal institution without a forum and without a geographic basis. Therefore, Article 3149 of the Quebec Code of Civil Procedure, which grants Quebec courts unwaivable jurisdiction over consumer disputes where consumer is domiciled in Quebec and case has an 'international element', does not apply.

4. Article 940.6 of the Code of Civil Procedure attaches considerable interpretive weight to the Model Law in international arbitration cases.

5. Absent clear legislation to the contrary, arbitration clauses inserted in consumer contracts should be enforced like other arbitration clauses; vi) absent clear legislation to the contrary, the right to commence a class action is not a public order right and can thus be waived, even through a pre-dispute arbitration clause; The arbitration clause set out in terms and conditions found on Dell's website was part of the contract concluded by the consumers, despite that only a hyperlink pointing to those terms and conditions "rather than the full text thereof' was brought to the consumers" attention when they placed their orders.

6. Article 11.1 of the Consumer Protection Act, which prohibits any stipulation obliging a consumer to refer a dispute to arbitration, does not apply retroactively and therefore has no impact on the case.
Model Law provisions at issue 8,16 Foreign sources (ML issues) Yes Foreign sources (non-ML issues) Yes Model Law explicity referred to Yes Travaux préparatoires explicitly referred to Yes
Full Text

Appeal allowed, Bastarache, LeBel and Fish JJ. dissenting.

English version of the judgment of McLachlin C.J. and Binnie, Deschamps, Abella, Charron and Rothstein JJ. delivered by

1 DESCHAMPS J. — The expansion of trade is without question spurring the development of rules governing international relations. Alternative dispute resolution mechanisms, including arbitration, are among the means the international community has adopted to increase efficiency in economic relationships. Concomitantly, in Quebec, recourse to arbitration has increased greatly owing this mechanism’s flexibility when compared with the traditional justice system.

2 This appeal relates to the debate over the place of arbitration in Quebec’s civil justice system. More specifically, the Court is asked to consider the validity and applicability of an arbitration agreement in the context of a domestic legal dispute under the rules of Quebec law and international law, and to determine whether the arbitrator or a court of law should rule first on these issues.

3 To ensure the internal consistency of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec, S.Q. 1991, c. 64 (“C.C.Q.”), it is necessary to adopt a contextual interpretation that limits the scope of the provisions of the title on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities to situations with a relevant foreign element. The prohibition in art. 3149 C.C.Q. against waiving the jurisdiction of Quebec authorities is found in that title and accordingly applies only to situations with a relevant foreign element. Since arbitration is in essence a neutral institution, it does not in itself have any foreign element. An arbitration tribunal has only those connections that the parties to the arbitration agreement intended it to have. The independence and territorial neutrality of arbitration are characteristics that must be promoted and preserved in order to foster the development of this institution. In the case at bar, the arbitration clause was not prohibited by any provision of Quebec legislation at the time it was invoked. Consequently, for the reasons that follow, I would allow the appeal, refer Mr. Dumoulin’s claim to arbitration and dismiss the motion for authorization to institute a class action.

1. Facts

4 Dell Computer Corporation (“Dell”) is a company that sells computer equipment retail over the Internet. It has its Canadian head office in Toronto and a place of business in Montreal. In the late afternoon of Friday, April 4, 2003, the order pages on Dell’s English‚ÄĎlanguage Web site indicated a price of $89 rather than $379 for the Axim X5 300 MHz handheld computer and a price of $118 rather than $549 for the Axim X5 400 MHz handheld computer. The pages of the site where the products were advertised listed the correct prices, however. On April 5, on being informed of the errors, Dell blocked access to the erroneous order pages through the usual address, although the pages were not withdrawn from the site. On the morning of April 7, Olivier Dumoulin, a Quebec consumer, was told about the prices by an acquaintance who sent him the detailed links, which the parties described as “deep links”. These links made it possible to access the order pages without following the usual route, that is, through the home page and the advertising pages. In short, the deep links made it possible to circumvent the measures taken by Dell. Using a deep link, Mr. Dumoulin ordered a computer at the price of $89. Shortly after Mr. Dumoulin placed his order, Dell corrected the two price errors. That same day, Dell posted a price correction notice and at the same time announced that it would not process orders for computers at the prices of $89 and $118. At trial, a Dell employee testified that over the course of that weekend, 354 Quebec consumers had placed a total of 509 orders for these Axim computers, whereas on an average weekend, only one to three of them were sold in Quebec.

5 On April 17, Mr. Dumoulin put Dell in default, demanding that it honour his order at the price of $89. When Dell refused, the Union des consommateurs and Mr. Dumoulin (“Union”) filed a motion for authorization to institute a class action against Dell. Dell applied for referral of Mr. Dumoulin’s claim to arbitration pursuant to an arbitration clause contained in the terms and conditions of sale, and dismissal of the motion for authorization to institute a class action. The Union contended that the arbitration clause was null and that, in any event, it could not be set up against Mr. Dumoulin.

2. Judicial History

6 The trial judge noted that according to the arbitration clause, arbitration proceedings were to be governed by the rules of the National Arbitration Forum (“NAF”), which is [translation] “located in the United States”. This led her to conclude that there was a foreign element for purposes of the rules of Quebec private international law and that the prohibition under art. 3149 C.C.Q., as interpreted in Dominion Bridge Corp. v. Knai, [1998] R.J.Q. 321 (C.A.), should apply. In her view, the arbitration clause could not be set up against Mr. Dumoulin. She then considered the criteria for instituting a class action and authorized the action against Dell ([2004] Q.J. No. 155 (QL)).

7 The Court of Appeal dismissed Dell’s appeal from that decision ([2005] R.J.Q. 1448, 2005 QCCA 570). It began by expressing its disagreement with the Superior Court’s application of the rules of Quebec private international law. According to the Court of Appeal, this was not a situation in which the consumer had waived the jurisdiction of Quebec authorities. It noted that the parties had agreed that the dispute was governed by the laws applicable in Quebec and that the arbitration could take place in Quebec. In its view, the instant case could be distinguished from Dominion Bridge, a case in which a foreign element had triggered the application of art. 3149 C.C.Q. However, the Court of Appeal concluded that the arbitration clause was external to the contract. Since Dell had not proven that the clause had been brought to the consumer’s attention, the effect of art. 1435 C.C.Q. was that the clause could not be set up against him. The Court of Appeal then briefly discussed whether an issue arising under the Consumer Protection Act, R.S.Q., c. P‚ÄĎ40.1, could be referred to arbitration and held that the Quebec legislature did not intend to preclude arbitration in such matters. Finally, it discussed, but did not accept, the argument that the class action should take precedence over arbitration, mentioning that the disputes that may not be submitted to arbitration are identified in the Civil Code of Qu√©bec and certain specific statutes.

8 On November 9, 2006, the Quebec Minister of Justice tabled Bill 48, An Act to amend the Consumer Protection Act and the Act respecting the collection of certain debts (2nd Sess., 37th Leg.) (“Bill 48”), in the National Assembly. One of the Bill’s provisions prohibits obliging a consumer to refer a dispute to arbitration. Bill 48, which came into force the day after the hearing of the appeal to this Court, does not include any transitional provisions applicable to this case.
 
3. Positions of the Parties

9 In this Court, the parties have reiterated the arguments raised in the Superior Court and the Court of Appeal. More specifically, Dell submits that the arbitration clause is not prohibited by any provision of Quebec legislation. It therefore is not contrary to public order, is not prohibited by art. 3149 C.C.Q., and is neither external nor abusive. Dell also contends that the courts are limited to conducting a prima facie analysis of the validity of an arbitration clause and must leave it to the arbitrator to consider the clause on the merits. According to Dell, this approach, which is based on the “competence‚ÄĎcompetence” principle, was implicitly adopted by this Court in Desputeaux v. √Čditions Chouette (1987) inc., [2003] 1 S.C.R. 178, 2003 SCC 17, and the Superior Court should have applied it in the case at bar and referred the matter to an arbitrator to assess the validity of the clause based on the Union’s submissions. The Union did not express an opinion on the degree of scrutiny to which the validity of the arbitration clause should be subject but did take a position, contrary to Dell’s, on every other issue.

10 After Bill 48 came into force, the Court asked the parties to make written submissions regarding its applicability to the instant case. Dell raised three arguments in support of its position that Bill 48 does not affect the case: that the Bill does not have retroactive effect; that the new legislation cannot apply to disputes already before the courts; and that Dell had a vested right to the arbitration procedure provided for in the contract with Mr. Dumoulin. The Union advanced only one argument: that the provision on arbitration clauses merely confirms an existing prohibition.

11 The parties have raised many issues. In my view, the most significant one in the context of this case concerns the application of art. 3149 C.C.Q. This question is not only a potentially decisive one for the parties, but also one that involves the ordering of the rules in the Civil Code of Qu√©bec; the answer to it will have repercussions on the interpretation of the other provisions of the title in which this article appears and on the interpretation of the Code in general. The analysis of this issue will lead me to consider the influence of international rules on Quebec law. These rules are also relevant to another issue: whether the competence‚ÄĎcompetence principle applies to the review of the application to refer the dispute to arbitration. The conclusion I will reach is that an arbitrator has jurisdiction to assess the validity and applicability of an arbitration clause and that, although there are exceptions, the decision regarding jurisdiction should initially be left to the arbitrator. However, in light of the state of the case, I will discuss all the issues that have been raised.

4. Application of Art. 3149 C.C.Q.

12 It will be helpful to reproduce the provision in issue and discuss its context. It reads as follows:

3149. A Québec authority also has jurisdiction to hear an action involving a consumer contract or a contract of employment if the consumer or worker has his domicile or residence in Québec; the waiver of such jurisdiction by the consumer or worker may not be set up against him.

This provision appears in Title Three, entitled “International Jurisdiction of Qu√©bec Authorities”, which is found in Book Ten of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec, entitled “Private International Law”. The Court must decide whether it applies in the case at bar. In my view, it is applicable only where there is a relevant foreign element that justifies resorting to the rules of Quebec private international law. I will explain why.

4.1 Context of Application of the Rules on the International Jurisdiction of Quebec Authorities

4.1.1 Purpose and Consequences of the Codification of Private International Law in the Civil Code of Québec

13 When the Quebec legislature began the reform of the civil law in the mid‚ÄĎtwentieth century, it did so in a way that was consistent with the civil law tradition in its purest form. As Professor Cr√©peau writes:

[translation] The Civil Code is an organic, ordered, structured, harmonious and cohesive whole that contains the substantive subject matters of private law, governing, in the civil law tradition, the legal status of persons and property, relationships between persons, and relationships between persons and property.
(P.‚ÄĎA. Cr√©peau, “Une certaine conception de la recodification”, in Du Code civil du Qu√©bec: Contribution √† l’histoire imm√©diate d’une recodification r√©ussie (2005), 23, at p. 40)

14 The codification process therefore entailed a reflection on all the principles and on how to organize them in one central document with a view to simplifying and clarifying the rules, and thus making them more accessible. The organization of rules is an essential feature of codification. Professors Brierley and Macdonald describe the impact of this feature on the mode of presentation and the interpretation of the Civil Code as follows:

A number of assumptions as to form underpin a Civil Code. Their common character is linked to notions of rationality and systematization, nicely captured by Weber’s expression — formal rationality. To say that a Civil Code is, and must be understood as, systematic and rationally organized implies that it reflects a consciously chosen, integrated design for presenting the law that has been consistently followed. . . .
. . .
The rational and systematic character of the Code also bears on its mode of presentation. One of the central features of the Code is its taxonomic structure. This affects both its organization and its drafting style. Just as the very existence of a Code labelled “Civil Code” presupposes a larger legal universe that can be divided and subdivided — public law, private law; and, within private law, procedure and substance; and, within substantive private law, commercial law and civil law — the same taxonomic approach is carried through into the Code itself. Its primary division is into large books — for example, persons, property, modes of acquisition of property, commercial law — each of which is subdivided into titles. Within these titles the Code is subdivided into chapters that, in turn, are divided into sections and sometimes into subsections. All the concepts relating to a given area of the law are thus logically derived from first principles, meticulously developed, and systematically ordered. . . .

In this architectonic mode of presentation, the inventory of subjects selected for inclusion and the manner of their placement serve to define the range of meaning that each of the subjects so included may have. The initial organizational choices bear directly on the manner in which the Code adapts to changing circumstances. . . .
(J. E. C. Brierley and R. A. Macdonald, Quebec Civil Law: An Introduction to Quebec Private Law (1993), at pp. 102‚ÄĎ4)

15 In his commentaries on the Civil Code of Qu√©bec, Quebec’s Minister of Justice confirmed that the Code [translation] “is a structured and hierarchical statutory scheme”: Commentaires du ministre de la Justice (1993), vol. I, at p. VII. For this reason, it cannot be assumed that the jurists who took part in the reform placed the provisions of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec in one title or another indiscriminately or without a concern for coherence. A codification process presupposes an ordering of rules, and the provisions of the title on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities reflect this general philosophy of codification.

4.1.2 Private International Law

16 Private international law is the branch of a state’s domestic law that governs private relationships that [translation] “exten[d] beyond the scope of a single national legal system”: √Č. Wyler and A. Papaux, “Extran√©it√© de valeurs et de syst√®mes en droit international priv√© et en droit international public”, in √Č. Wyler and A. Papaux, eds., L’extran√©it√© ou le d√©passement de l’ordre juridique √©tatique (1999), 239, at p. 241. Since every state has the power to adopt its own system of rules, the result is a variety of conceptions of private international law. Thus, in some countries, this branch of law is limited to the conflict of laws, whereas in France, private international law has a broader scope, extending also to questions concerning the status of foreign nationals and the nationality of persons. In English private international law, an intermediate approach has been adopted that generally concerns three types of questions: (i) conflict of laws, (ii) conflict of jurisdictions and (iii) the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments: Dicey, Morris and Collins on the Conflict of Laws (14th ed. 2006), vol. 1, at p. 4; P. North and J. J. Fawcett, Cheshire and North’s Private International Law (13th ed. 1999), at p. 7. What is the situation in Quebec law?

4.1.3 Legislative History of Quebec Private International Law

17 The drafters of the original rules of Quebec private international law naturally drew on French law. Like the Code Napol√©on, the Civil Code of Lower Canada contained only a few articles on this subject, and until the Civil Code of Qu√©bec was enacted in 1991, they and a few provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure, R.S.Q., c. C‚ÄĎ25 (“C.C.P.”), and from specific statutes constituted the private international law of Quebec.

18 While Quebec’s private international law was going through a period of relative stagnation in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a growing number of states had recourse to codification, adopting increasingly comprehensive and systematic rules: B. Audit, Droit international priv√© (4th ed. 2006), at para. 37; A. N. Makarov, “Sources”, in International Association of Legal Science, International Encyclopedia of Comparative Law, vol. III, Private International Law (1972), c. 2, at pp. 4‚ÄĎ5. The subsequent project to codify Quebec’s private international law was part of that trend; it was included in the mandate for the proposed general reform of the Civil Code that was assigned to the Civil Code Revision Office (“Office”) in 1965.

19 In 1975, an initial draft codification of the rules of Quebec private international law was submitted to the Office by its private international law committee, which was chaired by Professor J.‚ÄĎG. Castel. The content of this report was amended slightly and was incorporated two years later into Book Nine of the Draft Civil Code (Civil Code Revision Office, Report on the Qu√©bec Civil Code (1978), vol. I, Draft Civil Code, at pp. 593 et seq.). The preliminary chapter and Chapter I of Book Nine contained general provisions. Chapter II concerned conflicts of laws, while Chapter III dealt with conflicts of jurisdictions. Chapters IV and V dealt with the recognition and enforcement of foreign decisions and arbitration awards. Finally, Chapter VI codified the immunity from civil jurisdiction and execution enjoyed by foreign states and certain other international actors.

20 The structure of Book Nine attests to the Quebec legislature’s adoption of the intermediate approach of English private international law described by Dicey, Morris and Collins and North and Fawcett (mentioned above). The Office’s decision was the result of a process that stretched over many years.

21 The Office explained that Chapter III on conflicts of jurisdictions was adopted to make up for a lack of specific rules on private international law that had obliged courts to resort to the Code of Civil Procedure’s provisions on the judicial districts in Quebec where proceedings could be instituted:

To remedy this state of affairs and to distinguish between international and domestic jurisdiction, it seemed necessary to provide rules applicable exclusively to situations containing a foreign element. [Emphasis added.]
(Civil Code Revision Office, Report on the Québec Civil Code (1978), vol. II, t. 2, Commentaries, at p. 965)

22 In the commentaries that accompanied the final text of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec, the Minister of Justice mentioned a number of times that the various sections of Book Ten of the Civil Code apply to legal situations [translation] “with a foreign element”. He expressly repeated this in the introduction to Title Three on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities (Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, vol. II, at p. 1998). The Minister also reiterated the Office’s comments on the need for a set of jurisdictional rules for private international law distinct from the rules of the Code of Civil Procedure upon which the courts had relied until then:

[translation] Since there were no rules for determining whether Quebec authorities had jurisdiction over disputes with a foreign element, the courts had extended the domestic law rules of jurisdiction provided for in the Code of Civil Procedure to such situations.

The general objective of Title Three is to remedy this deficiency by establishing specific rules for determining the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities . . . .

(Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, vol. II, at p. 1998)

23 These commentaries shed light on the distinction between rules of jurisdiction governing purely domestic disputes and those that, because of a foreign element, form part of private international law. Where domestic disputes are concerned, the question of adjudicative jurisdiction is governed by the Code of Civil Procedure. In the case at bar, arts. 31 and 1000 C.C.P. are the provisions that confer jurisdiction over class actions on the Quebec Superior Court.

24 Given that domestic disputes are governed by the general provisions of Quebec domestic law, there is no reason to apply the rules relating to the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities to a dispute that involves no foreign element.

4.2 Foreign Element Concept

25 What is this foreign element that is omnipresent in the literature on private international law? Very little has been written about it. Of course, disputes in which rules of private international law are relied on usually have an international aspect and, as a result, the courts have not needed to elaborate on the parameters of the foreign element concept. One reference to this concept can be found in Quebecor Printing Memphis Inc. v. Regenair Inc., [2001] R.J.Q. 966 (C.A.), at para. 17, in which Philippon J. (ad hoc), dissenting on another issue, described the initial step of the analytical approach in private international law:

[translation] First, it had to be determined whether the dispute related to an international situation or a transnational event or had a foreign element. [Emphasis deleted.]

26 This foreign element can be defined, however. It must be “[a] point of contact which is legally relevant to a foreign country”, which means that the contact must be sufficient to play a role in determining whether a court has jurisdiction: J. A. Talpis and J.‚ÄĎG. Castel, “Interpreting the rules of private international law”, in Reform of the Civil Code (1993), vol. 5B, at p. 38 (emphasis added); Castel & Walker: Canadian Conflict of Laws (loose‚ÄĎleaf), vol. 1, at p. 1‚ÄĎ1; see also Wyler and Papaux, at p. 256.

27 Since our private international law is based on English law, it will be helpful to review the state of English law on this question. North and Fawcett define private international law as follows:

Private international law, then, is that part of law which comes into play when the issue before the court affects some fact, event or transaction that is so closely connected with a foreign system of law as to necessitate recourse to that system. [Emphasis added; p. 5.]

This definition is similar to the one adopted by Canadian authors, and it includes a notion common to many systems of private international law: the factor connecting a matter with a particular system. It follows that the foreign element and the connecting factor are overlapping notions. One author describes the connecting factor concept as follows:

The connecting factor is the element forming one of the facts of the case which is selected in order to attach a question of law to a legal system. The connecting factor determines the applicable law or the jurisdiction of a court. For instance, if the facts of a case present a question of intestate succession to movables, the element among those facts selected for the designation of the applicable law may be the last domicile, the last habitual residence, the nationality of the deceased or the situs of the movables. Likewise, one of these connecting factors may be employed to establish the jurisdiction of the courts to deal with intestate succession to movables.
(F. Vischer, “Connecting Factors”, in International Association of Legal Science, International Encyclopedia of Comparative Law, vol. III, Private International Law (1999), c. 4, at p. 3)

See also Y. Loussouarn, P. Bourel and P. de Vareilles‚ÄĎSommi√®res, Droit international priv√© (8th ed. 2004), at p. 2. The connecting factor and foreign element concepts are recognized in Quebec private international law, too: Talpis and Castel, at p. 38; C. Emanuelli, Droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois (2nd ed. 2006), at pp. 11‚ÄĎ12.

28 These two concepts can, therefore, overlap. A connecting factor is a tie to either the domestic or a foreign legal system, whereas the foreign element concept refers to a possible tie to a foreign legal system. Thus, in a personal action brought in Quebec, the fact that a defendant is domiciled in Quebec is a connecting factor with respect to the Quebec legal system but not a foreign element, whereas the fact that a defendant is domiciled in England will be considered both a connecting factor with respect to English jurisdiction and a foreign element with respect to the Quebec legal system. Certain of the connecting factors enumerated in Professor Vischer’s definition above are common to most systems of private international law (see on this point the enumerations in Loussouarn, Bourel and de Vareilles‚ÄĎSommi√®res, at p. 2; North and Fawcett, at p. 5).

29 A state is free to determine what connecting factors or foreign elements it considers to be relevant. In Quebec, the legislature adopted a number of factors already found in the main Western private international law systems. In the title of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec on the conflict of laws, these factors are divided into four main categories, each of which is addressed in a separate chapter: (1) personal factors, with the main one being the place of domicile; (2) property‚ÄĎrelated factors; (3) factors related to obligations, such as the place where a contract is entered into; and (4) factors related to procedure, which is usually governed by the law of the court hearing the case (arts. 3083 to 3133 C.C.Q.).

30 The legislature also provided for certain connecting factors in respect of the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities, which is the subject of a separate title. The place where one of the parties is domiciled heads the list of these factors, too. Article 3148 C.C.Q. shows this clearly:

3148. In personal actions of a patrimonial nature, a Québec authority has jurisdiction where

(1) the defendant has his domicile or residence in Québec;

(2) the defendant is a legal person, is not domiciled in Québec but has an establishment in Québec, and the dispute relates to its activities in Québec;

(3) a fault was committed in Québec, damage was suffered in Québec, an injurious act occurred in Québec or one of the obligations arising from a contract was to be performed in Québec;

(4) the parties have by agreement submitted to it all existing or future disputes between themselves arising out of a specified legal relationship;

(5) the defendant submits to its jurisdiction.

However, a Québec authority has no jurisdiction where the parties, by agreement, have chosen to submit all existing or future disputes between themselves relating to a specified legal relationship to a foreign authority or to an arbitrator, unless the defendant submits to the jurisdiction of the Québec authority.

See also arts. 3134, 3141 to 3147, 3149, 3150, and 3154, para. 2 C.C.Q. Other factors that are considered include the place where damage was suffered or an injurious act occurred (art. 3148, para. 1(3) C.C.Q.), and the place where the property in dispute is located (arts. 3152 to 3154, para. 1 C.C.Q.).

31 It can be seen that what these traditional factors have in common is a concrete connection with Quebec; if private international law is invoked, it can be assumed that there is an equally concrete foreign element that can serve as a basis for applying a foreign legal system. Despite the developments I have just mentioned, we should question the postulate that the rules of Quebec private international law apply only where there is a foreign element.

32 In the Office’s Draft Civil Code, it was clear that a foreign element was necessary. In its commentary on the provision on the law applicable to juridical acts, the Office stated the following:

It should be noted that the text applies to juridical acts of an international character. The parties are not free to refer to a law not related to their act unless that act contains a foreign element.
(Civil Code Revision Office, Report on the Québec Civil Code, vol. II, t. 2, Commentaries, at p. 977 (commentary on art. 21 of Book Nine of the Draft Civil Code))

In discussing art. 48 of Book Nine of the Draft Civil Code, the predecessor of art. 3148 C.C.Q. on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities, the Office stated that the jurisdictional rules set out in this article “are intended to apply to situations involving a foreign element” (Civil Code Revision Office, vol. II, t. 2, at p. 988).

33 The 1988 draft bill did not substantively alter the traditional foreign element requirement (An Act to add the reformed law of evidence and of prescription and the reformed private international law to the Civil Code of Québec). The wording of art. 3477 of the draft bill on the designation of the applicable law was substantially similar to that of the final version of the provision in the Civil Code of Québec (art. 3111). It read as follows:

3477. A juridical act containing a foreign element is governed by the law expressly designated in the instrument or the designation of which may be inferred with certainty from the terms of the act.

A system of law may be expressly designated as applicable to the whole or a part only of a juridical act.

34 The reference in this article to the foreign element led professors Talpis and Goldstein to ask whether such a reference was necessary, since they considered the foreign element requirement to be essential:

[TRANSLATION] It might first be asked whether it was necessary to specify that the parties may choose the applicable law only for a contract “containing a foreign element”. It is obvious that the existence of a foreign element is the sine qua non of recourse to all the rules in Book Ten of the future Civil Code. However, since the Draft Bill does not include a specific provision on evasion of the law, this reference may have been intended to indicate that the will of the parties is not sufficient to turn a contract connected entirely with Quebec into an international one. [Underlining added.]
(J. A. Talpis and G. Goldstein, “Analyse critique de l’avant projet de loi du Qu√©bec en droit international priv√©” (1989), 91 R. du N. 456, at p. 476)

As for art. 3511 of the 1988 draft bill, which concerned the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities, it already contained all the substantive elements of the future art. 3148 C.C.Q.

35 In Bill 125 of 1990, the Civil Code of Québec, however, the foreign element requirement was not retained with respect to the designation of the applicable law. The legislature incorporated a special rule into the provision. The final version of art. 3111 includes an addition to the text that was initially proposed:

3111. A juridical act, whether or not it contains any foreign element, is governed by the law expressly designated in the act or the designation of which may be inferred with certainty from the terms of the act.

A juridical act containing no foreign element remains, nevertheless, subject to the mandatory provisions of the law of the country which would apply if none were designated.

The law of a country may be expressly designated as applicable to the whole or a part only of a juridical act.

What this addition brings to the title on the conflict of laws is to make it possible for the parties to provide that a purely domestic juridical act will be governed by the law of a foreign jurisdiction. However, immediately after recognizing the autonomy of the will of the parties where the designation of the applicable law is concerned, the legislature hastened to limit it in the second paragraph of the provision. Thus, in the absence of a foreign element, a juridical act remains subject to the mandatory rules that would apply if no law were designated. As a result, the designation of the law of a foreign jurisdiction in an act that contains no foreign element is a special circumstance that was cautiously introduced into Quebec private international law and is confined to the rules applicable to the conflict of laws.

36 I should add that the wording of art. 3111 C.C.Q. is based on that of art. 3 of the Convention on the Law Applicable to Contractual Obligations (Rome Convention of 1980), which authorizes the “[choice of] a foreign law” where there is no foreign element. It is also conceivable that the determination of the law applicable to a juridical act will at times require a more complex analysis than the one to be made where adjudicative jurisdiction is in issue. Thus, a juridical act, such as a giving of security, that appears to have only domestic connections may in reality be part of an international transaction whose ramifications are not in issue in a given dispute. So there are several possible explanations for the exception provided for in Title Two on the conflict of laws.

37 In the title on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities, on the other hand, there is no exception to the foreign element requirement, and it is clear that a court asked to apply the rules of private international law must first determine whether the situation involves a foreign element. This position is consistent with the traditional definition of private international law and with the Office’s intention. It must now be asked whether, in the case at bar, the choice of arbitration procedure gives rise to a foreign element warranting the application of art. 3149 C.C.Q. To answer this question, it will be necessary to consider how arbitration has been incorporated into Quebec law.

4.3 Arbitration in Quebec

4.3.1 International Sources

38 International arbitration law is strongly influenced by two texts drafted under the auspices of the United Nations: the Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, 330 U.N.T.S. 3 (“New York Convention”), and the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration, U.N. Doc. A/40/17 (1985), Annex I (“Model Law”).

39 The New York Convention entered into force in 1959. Article II of the Convention provides that a court of a contracting state that is seized of an action in a matter covered by an arbitration clause must refer the parties to arbitration. At present, 142 countries are parties to the Convention. The accession of this many countries is evidence of a broad consensus in favour of the institution of arbitration. Lord Mustill wrote the following about the Convention:

This Convention has been the most successful international instrument in the field of arbitration, and perhaps could lay claim to be the most effective instance of international legislation in the entire history of commercial law.
(M. J. Mustill, “Arbitration: History and Background” (1989), 6 J. Int’l Arb. 43, at p. 49)

Canada acceded to the New York Convention on May 12, 1986.

40 The Model Law is another fundamental text in the area of international commercial arbitration. It is a model for legislation that the UN recommends that states take into consideration in order to standardize the rules of international commercial arbitration. The Model Law was drafted in a manner that ensured consistency with the New York Convention: F. Bachand, “Does Article 8 of the Model Law Call for Full or Prima Facie Review of the Arbitral Tribunal’s Jurisdiction?” (2006), 22 Arb. Int’l 463, at p. 470; S. Kierstead, “Referral to Arbitration under Article 8 of the UNCITRAL Model Law: The Canadian Approach” (1999), 31 Can. Bus. L.J. 98, at pp. 100 101.

41 The final text of the Model Law was adopted on June 21, 1985 by the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (“UNCITRAL”). In its explanatory note on the Model Law, the UNCITRAL Secretariat states that it:

reflects a worldwide consensus on the principles and important issues of international arbitration practice. It is acceptable to States of all regions and the different legal or economic systems of the world.
(“Explanatory Note by the UNCITRAL Secretariat on the Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration”, U.N. Doc. A/40/17, Annex I, at para. 2)

In 1986, Parliament enacted the Commercial Arbitration Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. 17 (2nd Supp.), which was based on the Model Law. The Quebec legislature followed suit that same year and incorporated the Model Law into its legislation. Quebec’s Minister of Justice at the time, Herbert Marx, reiterated the above quoted comment by the UNCITRAL Secretariat: National Assembly, Journal des d√©bats, vol. 29, No. 46, 1st Sess., 33rd Leg., June 16, 1986, at p. 2975, and vol. 29, No. 55, October 30, 1986, at p. 3672.

4.3.2 Nature and Scope of the 1986 Legislative Amendments to the Civil Code of Lower Canada and the Code of Civil Procedure

42 In 1986, the Act to amend the Civil Code and the Code of Civil Procedure in respect of arbitration, S.Q. 1986, c. 73 (“Bill 91”), which established a scheme for promoting arbitration in Quebec, was tabled in the legislature. Bill 91 added a new title on arbitration agreements to the Civil Code of Lower Canada. This title consisted of only six provisions setting out a few general principles relating to the validity and applicability of such agreements. The legislature’s decision to place arbitration agreements among the nominate contracts in the Civil Code of Lower Canada is significant. After that, there was no longer any reason to regard arbitration agreements as being outside the sphere of the general law; on the contrary, they were now an integral part of it: Condominiums Mont St Sauveur inc. v. Constructions Serge Sauv√© lt√©e, [1990] R.J.Q. 2783 (C.A.), at p. 2785; J. E. C. Brierley, “Arbitration Agreements: Articles 2638 2643”, in Reform of the Civil Code (1993), vol. 3B, at p. 1. The provisions added by Bill 91 would be restated without any major changes in the chapter of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec on arbitration agreements.

43 Bill 91 also had a considerable impact on the Code of Civil Procedure. Substantial additions were made to Book VII on arbitrations, which was divided into two titles. Title I is a veritable code of arbitral procedure that regulates every step of an arbitration proceeding subject to Quebec law, from the appointment of the arbitrator to the order of the proceeding to the award and homologation. Most of these rules apply only “where the parties have not made stipulations to the contrary” (art. 940 C.C.P.). Title II sets out a system of rules applicable to the recognition and execution of arbitration awards made outside Quebec.

44 Although Bill 91 was the Quebec legislature’s response to Canada’s accession to the New York Convention and to UNCITRAL’s adoption of the Model Law, it is not identical to those two instruments. As the Quebec Minister of Justice noted, Bill 91 was [TRANSLATION] “inspired” by the Model Law and [TRANSLATION] “implement[ed]” the New York Convention: Journal des d√©bats, October 30, 1986, at p. 3672. For this reason, it is important to consider the interplay between Quebec’s domestic law and private international law before interpreting the provisions of Bill 91.

45 This Court analysed the interplay between the New York Convention and Bill 91 in GreCon Dimter inc. v. J.R. Normand inc., [2005] 2 S.C.R. 401, 2005 SCC 46, at paras. 39 et seq. After noting that there is a recognized presumption of conformity with international law, the Court mentioned that Bill 91 “incorporate[s] the principles of the New York Convention” and concluded that the Convention is a formal source for interpreting the provisions of Quebec law governing the enforcement of arbitration agreements: para. 41. This conclusion is confirmed by art. 948, para. 2 C.C.P., which provides that the interpretation of Title II on the recognition and execution of arbitration awards made outside Quebec (arts. 948 to 951.2 C.C.P.) “shall take into account, where applicable, the [New York] Convention”.

46 The same is not true of the Model Law. Unlike an instrument of conventional international law, the Model Law is a non binding document that the United Nations General Assembly has recommended that states take into consideration. Thus, Canada has made no commitment to the international community to implement the Model Law as it did in the case of the New York Convention. Nevertheless, art. 940.6 C.C.P. attaches considerable interpretive weight to the Model Law in international arbitration cases:

940.6 Where matters of extraprovincial or international trade are at issue in an arbitration, the interpretation of this Title, where applicable, shall take into consideration:

(1) the Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration as adopted by the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law on 21 June 1985;

(2) the Report of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law on the work of its eighteenth session held in Vienna from the third to the twenty first day of June 1985;

(3) the Analytical Commentary on the draft text of a model law on international commercial arbitration contained in the report of the Secretary General to the eighteenth session of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law.

47 In short, to quote Professor Brierley, Bill 91 opened Quebec arbitration law to “international thinking” in this area; this international thinking “has become a formal source of Quebec positive law”: J. E. C. Brierley, “Quebec’s New (1986) Arbitration Law” (1987 88), 13 Can. Bus. L.J. 58, at pp. 63 and 68 69.

4.3.3 Status of Arbitration in Quebec Private International Law

48 Bill 91 established the legal framework applicable to arbitration. Not all arbitration proceedings are subject to the same rules. First, Title I on arbitration proceedings applies only if the parties have not stipulated that they intend to opt out of it. In addition, the facts of the case must call for application of the Code of Civil Procedure either because the foreign parties have chosen it in accordance with a provision authorizing them to do so in a law that would otherwise govern this proceeding or because the circumstances of the proceeding necessitate the application of Quebec law. Second, Title II of Book VII of the Code of Civil Procedure contains special provisions on the recognition and execution of arbitration awards made outside Quebec. Third, art. 940.6 C.C.P. provides that Title I on arbitration proceedings is to be interpreted in light, where applicable, of the Model Law and certain documents related to it “[w]here matters of extraprovincial or international trade are at issue in an arbitration”. As Professor Marquis notes, the words “mettant en cause des int√©r√™ts du commerce” in the French version of art. 940.6 have an [TRANSLATION] “unfamiliar sound in Quebec law”: L. Marquis, “Le droit fran√ßais et le droit qu√©b√©cois de l’arbitrage conventionnel”, in H. P. Glenn, ed., Droit qu√©b√©cois et droit fran√ßais: communaut√©, autonomie, concordance (1993), 447, at p. 483. In fact, they were taken straight from the French Code de proc√©dure civile:

[TRANSLATION] 1492. Arbitration is international where matters of international trade are at issue.

Because the same words are used, Quebec authors agree that art. 940.6 C.C.P. has imported the concept of international arbitration from French law: S. Guillemard, Le droit international priv√© face au contrat de vente cyberspatial (2006), at pp. 73 74; S. Thuilleaux, L’arbitrage commercial au Qu√©bec: Droit interne — Droit international priv√© (1991), at p. 129; L. Marquis, “La notion d’arbitrage commercial international en droit qu√©b√©cois” (1991 1992), 37 McGill L.J. 448, at pp. 465 and 469.

49 The matter of international trade test is different from connecting factors such as the parties’ place of residence or the place where the obligations are performed. Thus, a contractual legal situation may have foreign elements without involving any matters of extraprovincial or international trade; in such a case, although the resulting arbitration will not be considered an international arbitration, it will nonetheless be subject to the rules of private international law. Since the case at bar does not involve international commercial arbitration, this explanation is intended merely to highlight the fact that the test under art. 940.6 C.C.P. is clearly distinct from the foreign element requirement. Where the Quebec legislature intended different rules to apply, it has made this clear.

50 The rules on arbitration proceedings set out in Title I of Book VII of the Code of Civil Procedure apply, to the extent provided for, to any arbitration proceeding subject to Quebec law. The parties are free to attribute foreign connections to an arbitration process, in which case the rules of private international law may be applicable. However, an arbitration clause is not in itself a foreign element warranting the application of the rules of Quebec private international law. The commentators are unanimous on this point:

[TRANSLATION] It is clear that if an arbitration process is considered to be purely internal to Quebec, the law of Quebec will be applied to it. The rules of private international law will not be applicable. It is Quebec’s Code of Civil Procedure (rules on arbitration) that will be applied.
(J. B√©guin, L’arbitrage commercial international (1987), at p. 67)

See also to the same effect, in respect of comparative law, E. Gaillard and J. Savage, Fouchard, Gaillard, Goldman on International Commercial Arbitration (1999), at p. 47.

51 The neutrality of arbitration as an institution is one of the fundamental characteristics of this alternative dispute resolution mechanism. Unlike the foreign element, which suggests a possible connection with a foreign state, arbitration is an institution without a forum and without a geographic basis: Guillemard, at p. 77; Thuilleaux, at p. 145. Arbitration is part of no state’s judicial system: Desputeaux, at para. 41. The arbitrator has no allegiance or connection to any single country: M. Lehmann, “A Plea for a Transnational Approach to Arbitrability in Arbitral Practice” (2003 2004), 42 Colum. J. Transnat’l L. 753, at p. 755. In short, arbitration is a creature that owes its existence to the will of the parties alone: Laurentienne vie, compagnie d’assurance inc. v. Empire, compagnie d’assurance vie, [2000] R.J.Q. 1708 (C.A.), at paras. 13 and 16.

52 To say that the choice of arbitration as a dispute resolution mechanism gives rise to a foreign element would be tantamount to saying that arbitration itself establishes a connection to a given territory, and this would be in outright contradiction to the very essence of the institution of arbitration: its neutrality. This institution is territorially neutral; it contains no foreign element. Furthermore, the parties to an arbitration agreement are free, subject to any mandatory provisions by which they are bound, to choose any place, form and procedures they consider appropriate. They can choose cyberspace and establish their own rules. It was open to the parties in the instant case to refer to the Code of Civil Procedure, to base their procedure on a Quebec or U.S. arbitration guide or to choose rules drawn up by a recognized organization, such as the International Chamber of Commerce, the Canadian Commercial Arbitration Centre or the NAF. The choice of procedure does not alter the institution of arbitration in any of these cases. The rules become those of the parties, regardless of where they are taken from.

53 I cannot therefore see how the parties’ choice of arbitration can in itself create a foreign element. Such an interpretation would empty the foreign element concept of all meaning. An arbitration that contains no foreign element in the true sense of the word is a domestic arbitration. The rules on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities will apply only to an arbitration containing a foreign element, such as where a defendant in a case involving a personal claim is domiciled in another country.

54 It must now be determined whether the facts of the present case contain a foreign element.

4.4 Seeking to Identify a Foreign Element in the Facts of the Case at Bar

55 The trial judge saw a foreign element in the fact that [TRANSLATION] “[t]he NAF is located in the United States” (para. 32). The Court of Appeal rejected this conclusion, and the Union has abandoned this argument. Like other organizations, such as the International Chamber of Commerce and the Canadian Commercial Arbitration Centre, the NAF offers arbitration services. The place where decisions concerning arbitration services are made or where the employees of these organizations work has no impact on the disputes in which their rules are used.

56 Thus, the location of the NAF’s head office is not a relevant foreign element for purposes of the application of Quebec private international law. Moreover, Dell having conceded that the arbitration proceeding will take place in Quebec should put an end to the debate regarding the place of arbitration.

57 Another potential foreign element is found in the NAF’s Code of Procedure (National Arbitration Forum Code of Procedure). Rules 5O and 48B of the NAF Code provide that, unless the parties agree otherwise, arbitrations and arbitration procedures are governed by the U.S. Federal Arbitration Act. In Quebec, designation of the applicable law is governed by Title Two of Book Ten of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec on the conflict of laws. The parties’ designation of the applicable law under this title is not ordinarily recognized as a foreign element in the subsequent title on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities. In any event, since art. 3111 C.C.Q., which I discussed above, refers to designation of the law applicable to a juridical act containing no foreign element, the designation itself does not produce such an element.

58 The Union raised a final element: the language of the proceedings. According to the NAF Code, English is the language used in NAF proceedings, although the parties may choose another language, in which case the NAF or the arbitrator may order the parties to provide any necessary translation and interpretation services at their own cost (rules 11D and 35G of the NAF Code).

59 In my view, the language argument must fail. Although I agree that the use of a language with which the consumer is not familiar may cause difficulties, neither the French nor the English language can be characterized as a foreign element in Canada.

60 My colleagues Bastarache and LeBel JJ. nonetheless consider it logical to accept that an arbitration clause in itself constitutes a foreign element that can result in application of the provisions on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities. Their interpretation has consequences for agreements other than consumer contracts. Thus, it would also be impossible to set up against a Quebec worker any undertaking to submit to an arbitrator any future disputes with his or her Quebec employer relating to an individual contract of employment. Furthermore, any arbitration agreement concerning damage suffered as a result of exposure to raw materials originating in Quebec would be null (see arts. 3151 and 3129 C.C.Q.), even an agreement between a Quebec supplier and a Quebec producer. This interpretation is hard to accept. It implies that the codifiers failed to achieve their objective of ordering the rules in both Book Ten on private international law and Chapter XVIII on arbitration agreements in Book Five. This is an important point, and it is not strictly confined to the foreign element argument. I will therefore consider it separately.

4.5 Ordering of the Rules on Arbitration

61 The chapter on arbitration is found in the important Book Five of the Civil Code of Québec on obligations. Book Five is divided into two titles, the first of which concerns obligations in general, while the second concerns nominate contracts. Chapter XVIII is the final chapter of the title on nominate contracts. It incorporates the provisions of Bill 91 enacted in 1986, which I have already discussed. It contains a general provision, art. 2638 C.C.Q., which is based on the recognition that an arbitration agreement is valid and can be set up against a party:

2638. An arbitration agreement is a contract by which the parties undertake to submit a present or future dispute to the decision of one or more arbitrators, to the exclusion of the courts.

In his commentary on this provision, the Minister of Justice stated that the essential purpose of the arbitration agreement is [TRANSLATION] “to displace judicial intervention” and that “by conferring jurisdiction on arbitrators, [one] ousts the usual jurisdiction of the judiciary”: Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, vol. II, at p. 1649.

62 Chapter XVIII also contains a provision that enumerates the cases in which the jurisdiction of the Quebec courts cannot be ousted by the parties. This provision reads as follows:

2639. Disputes over the status and capacity of persons, family matters or other matters of public order may not be submitted to arbitration.

An arbitration agreement may not be opposed on the ground that the rules applicable to settlement of the dispute are in the nature of rules of public order.

63 Thus, the codifiers laid down, for disputes containing no foreign element, specific rules dealing, on the one hand, with the effect of the arbitration agreement and, on the other, with cases in which arbitration is not available under domestic law. They therefore considered what matters should be arbitrable. Where disputes not involving private international law issues are concerned, these matters are set out in the provisions governing arbitration. Article 3148, para. 2 C.C.Q. does not simply restate the text of art. 2638 C.C.Q. Rather, it lays down the same rule as it applies to an arbitration agreement containing a foreign element. To give arts. 3149 and 3151 C.C.Q. general application, it would be necessary to infer that the codifiers were inconsistent in not including, in the chapter on arbitration, the exceptions relating to consumer contracts, contracts of employment and claims regarding exposure to raw materials.

64 Furthermore, to view art. 3149 C.C.Q. as being limited to private international law is consistent with the legislature’s objective. This provision is one of the new measures the legislature inserted into the title on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities to protect certain more vulnerable groups: Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, vol. II, at p. 2011. Article 3149 C.C.Q. refers to two of these groups, Quebec consumers and workers, who cannot waive the jurisdiction of a Quebec authority. I agree with the following comment by Beauregard J.A. of the Quebec Court of Appeal in Dominion Bridge with regard to the legislature’s general objective in enacting art. 3149 C.C.Q.:

[TRANSLATION] In my view, it is clear that the legislature intended to ensure that employees could not be required to go abroad to assert rights under a contract of employment. [p. 325]

Thus, the reason why an arbitration clause cannot be set up against a consumer under the title on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities is clearly to protect a consumer in a situation with a foreign element.

65 In enacting art. 3149 C.C.Q., the legislature could not have intended to take an obscure approach requiring a decontextualized reading of the title on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities. The interpretation of art. 3149 C.C.Q. must be consistent with the legislature’s objective of protecting vulnerable groups and must be harmonized not only with the title on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities, but also with the entire book of the C.C.Q. on private international law and Chapter XVIII on arbitration (in Title Two of Book Five), and with Book VII of the Code of Civil Procedure on arbitration. This brings out the internal consistency of these rules, which interact harmoniously and without redundancy. The general provisions on arbitration are grouped together in the books, titles and chapters of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec and the Code of Civil Procedure, and specific exceptions are set out in these provisions. It would not be appropriate to shatter the consistency of the rules on arbitration and those on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities by placing all disputes concerning an arbitrator’s jurisdiction within the scope of the rules on the jurisdiction of Quebec authorities regardless of whether there is a foreign element.

4.6 Conclusion on the Application of Art. 3149 C.C.Q.

66 The legal experts who worked on the reform of the Civil Code, the Minister of Justice who was in office at the time of the enactment of the Civil Code of Québec, and many Canadian and foreign authors recognized that a foreign element was a prerequisite for applying the rules on the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities. The ordering effected in a codification process and the rule that a provision must be interpreted in light of its context require an interpretation of art. 3149 C.C.Q. that limits it to cases with a foreign element.

67 I will now discuss the other issues before this Court. They concern the degree of scrutiny of an arbitration clause by the Superior Court, and the validity and applicability of the arbitration clause.

5. Degree of Scrutiny of an Arbitration Clause by the Superior Court in Considering a Referral Application

68 The objective of this part is to determine whether it is the arbitrator or a court that should rule first on the parties’ arguments on the validity or applicability of an arbitration agreement. I will accordingly consider the limits of intervention by the courts in cases involving arbitration agreements.

5.1 Competence of Arbitrators to Rule on Their Own Jurisdiction in International Law

69 There are two opposing schools of thought in the debate over the degree of judicial scrutiny of an arbitrator’s jurisdiction under an arbitration agreement. Under one, it is the court that must rule first on the arbitrator’s jurisdiction; this view is based on a concern to avoid a duplication of proceedings. Since the court has the power to review the arbitrator’s decision regarding his or her jurisdiction, why should the arbitrator be allowed to make an initial ruling on this issue? According to this view, it would be preferable to have the court settle any challenge to the arbitrator’s jurisdiction immediately. This first school of thought thus favours an interventionist judicial approach to questions relating to the jurisdiction of arbitrators.

70 The other school of thought gives precedence to the arbitration process. It is concerned with preventing delaying tactics and is associated with the principle commonly known as the “competence competence” principle. According to it, arbitrators should be allowed to exercise their power to rule first on their own jurisdiction (Gaillard and Savage, at p. 401).

71 The New York Convention does not expressly require the adoption of either of these schools of thought. Article II(3) reads as follows:

The court of a Contracting State, when seized of an action in a matter in respect of which the parties have made an agreement within the meaning of this article, shall, at the request of one of the parties, refer the parties to arbitration, unless it finds that the said agreement is null and void, inoperative or incapable of being performed.

72 According to some authors, this provision means that referral is the general rule: Gaillard and Savage, at pp. 402 4; F. Bachand, L’intervention du juge canadien avant et durant un arbitrage commercial international (2005), at pp. 178 79 and 183. Its wording indicates that the court must not rule on the arbitrator’s jurisdiction unless the clause is clearly null and void, inoperative or incapable of being performed.

73 The fact that art. II(3) of the New York Convention provides that the court can rule on whether an agreement is null and void, inoperative or incapable of being performed does not mean that it is required to do so before the arbitrator does, however.

74 The Model Law, which, as I mentioned above, was drafted consistently with the New York Convention, is clearer. First of all, the wording of art. 8(1) of the Model Law is almost identical to that of art. II(3) of the New York Convention. What is more, art. 16 of the Model Law expressly recognizes the competence competence principle. It reads as follows:

Article 16. Competence of arbitral tribunal to rule on its jurisdiction

(1) The arbitral tribunal may rule on its own jurisdiction, including any objections with respect to the existence or validity of the arbitration agreement. For that purpose, an arbitration clause which forms part of a contract shall be treated as an agreement independent of the other terms of the contract. A decision by the arbitral tribunal that the contract is null and void shall not entail ispo jure the invalidity of the arbitration clause.

(2) A plea that the arbitral tribunal does not have jurisdiction shall be raised not later than the submission of the statement of defence. A party is not precluded from raising such a plea by the fact that he has appointed, or participated in the appointment of, an arbitrator. A plea that the arbitral tribunal is exceeding the scope of its authority shall be raised as soon as the matter alleged to be beyond the scope of its authority is raised during the arbitral proceedings. The arbitral tribunal may, in either case, admit a later plea if it considers the delay justified.

(3) The arbitral tribunal may rule on a plea referred to in paragraph (2) of this article either as a preliminary question or in an award on the merits. If the arbitral tribunal rules as a preliminary question that it has jurisdiction, any party may request, within thirty days after having received notice of that ruling, the court specified in article 6 to decide the matter, which decision shall be subject to no appeal; while such a request is pending, the arbitral tribunal may continue the arbitral proceedings and make an award.

75 Some authors argue that the competence competence principle requires the court to limit itself to a prima facie analysis of the application and to refer the parties to arbitration unless the arbitration agreement is manifestly tainted by a defect rendering it invalid or inapplicable: F. Bachand, “Does Article 8 of the Model Law Call for Full or Prima Facie Review of the Arbitral Tribunal’s Jurisdiction?” According to Professor Bachand, this interpretation is confirmed by the legislative history of the Model Law. This approach has also been adopted in a number of countries; France, for example, has formally incorporated the approach in art. 1458 of its Code de proc√©dure civile. The prima facie test has also been adopted in Switzerland by way of judicial interpretation: decision of the 1st Civil Court dated April 29, 1996 in Fondation M. v. Banque X., BGE 122 III 139 (1996), cited by Gaillard and Savage, at p. 409.

76 The manifest nullity test is a fairly strict one:

[TRANSLATION] The nullity of an arbitration agreement will be manifest if it is incontestable. . . . As soon as a serious debate arises about the validity of the arbitration agreement, only the arbitrator can validly conduct the review. . . . An apparently valid arbitration clause will never be considered to be manifestly null.
(√Č. Loquin, “Comp√©tence arbitrale”, Juris classeur Proc√©dure civile, fasc. 1034 (1994), No. 105)

77 Despite the lack of consensus in the international community, the prima facie analysis test is gaining acceptance and has the support of many authors: Gaillard and Savage, at pp. 407 13; Bachand, “Does Article 8 of the Model Law Call for Full or Prima Facie Review of the Arbitral Tribunal’s Jurisdiction?” This test is indicative of a deferential approach to the jurisdiction of arbitrators.

78 Having completed this review of international law, I will now consider the state of Quebec law on this issue.

5.2 Quebec Test for Judicial Intervention in a Case Involving an Arbitration Agreement

79 The legal framework governing referral to arbitration is set out in the Code of Civil Procedure. The relevant provisions read as follows:

940.1 Where an action is brought regarding a dispute in a matter on which the parties have an arbitration agreement, the court shall refer them to arbitration on the application of either of them unless the case has been inscribed on the roll or it finds the agreement null.

The arbitration proceedings may nevertheless be commenced or pursued and an award made at any time while the case is pending before the court.
(. . .)
943. The arbitrators may decide the matter of their own competence.

943.1 If the arbitrators declare themselves competent during the arbitration proceedings, a party may within thirty days of being notified thereof apply to the court for a decision on that matter.

While such a case is pending, the arbitrators may pursue the arbitration proceedings and make their award.

943.2 A decision of the court during the arbitration proceedings recognizing the competence of the arbitrators is final and without appeal.

80 It should be noted from the outset that art. 940.1 C.C.P. incorporates the essence of art. II(3) of the New York Convention and of its counterpart in the Model Law, art. 8. Furthermore, art. 943 C.C.P. confers on arbitrators the competence to rule on their own jurisdiction. This article clearly indicates acceptance of the competence competence principle incorporated into art. 16 of the Model Law.

81 A review of the case law on arbitration reveals that Quebec courts have often accepted or refused to give effect to arbitration clauses without reflecting on the degree of scrutiny required of them: C.C.I.C. Consultech International v. Silverman, [1991] R.D.J. 500 (C.A.); Banque Nationale du Canada v. Premdev inc., [1997] Q.J. No. 689 (QL) (C.A.); Acier Leroux inc. v. Tremblay, [2004] R.J.Q. 839 (C.A.); Robertson Building Systems Ltd. v. Constructions de la Source inc., [2006] Q.J. No. 3118 (QL), 2006 QCCA 461; Compagnie nationale alg√©rienne de navigation v. Pegasus Lines Ltd. S.A., [1994] Q.J. No. 329 (QL) (C.A.). However, it can be seen that where the analysis of a clause requires an assessment of contradictory factual evidence, Quebec courts can be reluctant to engage in a review on the merits. For example, in Kingsway Financial Services Inc. v. 118997 Canada inc., [1999] Q.J. No. 5922 (QL) (C.A.), the buyer sued the seller on the basis of error induced by fraud. The court hearing the case had to decide whether the seller had made false representations to the buyer. The Court of Appeal simply referred the case to arbitration.

82 One author suggests that Quebec courts are more deferential as regards the jurisdiction of arbitrators when hearing cases that simply concern the applicability of an arbitration clause, whereas if it is the validity of the same clause that is an issue, the rule they seem to observe is to dispose of the issue immediately: F. Bachand, L’intervention du juge canadien avant et durant un arbitrage commercial international, at pp. 190 91. Although I agree that a distinction can be made between a case concerning validity and one concerning applicability, it cannot be said that the Quebec courts have uniformly used or identified this distinction as a criterion for intervening. Nor has it been adopted in the rest of Canada, where the prima facie analysis has also been extended to cases concerning the applicability of an arbitration clause: Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. v. Arochem International Ltd. (1992), 66 B.C.L.R. (2d) 113 (C.A.); Dalimpex Ltd. v. Janicki (2003), 228 D.L.R. (4th) 179 (Ont. C.A.). I therefore consider it necessary to pursue the analysis beyond this distinction.

83 Article 940.1 C.C.P. refers only to cases where the arbitration agreement is null. However, since this provision was adopted in the context of the implementation of the New York Convention (the words of which, in art. II(3), are “null and void, inoperative or incapable of being performed”), I do not consider a literal interpretation to be appropriate. It is possible to develop, in a manner consistent with the empirical data from the Quebec case law, a test for reviewing an application to refer a dispute to arbitration that is faithful to art. 943 C.C.P. and to the prima facie analysis test that is increasingly gaining acceptance around the world.

84 First of all, I would lay down a general rule that in any case involving an arbitration clause, a challenge to the arbitrator’s jurisdiction must be resolved first by the arbitrator. A court should depart from the rule of systematic referral to arbitration only if the challenge to the arbitrator’s jurisdiction is based solely on a question of law. This exception is justified by the courts’ expertise in resolving such questions, by the fact that the court is the forum to which the parties apply first when requesting referral and by the rule that an arbitrator’s decision regarding his or her jurisdiction can be reviewed by a court. It allows a legal argument relating to the arbitrator’s jurisdiction to be resolved once and for all, and also allows the parties to avoid duplication of a strictly legal debate. In addition, the danger that a party will obstruct the process by manipulating procedural rules will be reduced, since the court must not, in ruling on the arbitrator’s jurisdiction, consider the facts leading to the application of the arbitration clause.

85 If the challenge requires the production and review of factual evidence, the court should normally refer the case to arbitration, as arbitrators have, for this purpose, the same resources and expertise as courts. Where questions of mixed law and fact are concerned, the court hearing the referral application must refer the case to arbitration unless the questions of fact require only superficial consideration of the documentary evidence in the record.

86 Before departing from the general rule of referral, the court must be satisfied that the challenge to the arbitrator’s jurisdiction is not a delaying tactic and that it will not unduly impair the conduct of the arbitration proceeding. This means that even when considering one of the exceptions, the court might decide that to allow the arbitrator to rule first on his or her competence would be best for the arbitration process.

87 Thus, the general rule of the Quebec test is consistent with the competence- competence principle set out in art. 16 of the Model Law, which has been incorporated into art. 943 C.C.P. As for the exception under which a court may rule first on questions of law relating to the arbitrator’s jurisdiction, this power is provided for in art. 940.1 C.C.P., which in fact recognizes that a court can itself find that the agreement is null rather than referring this issue to arbitration.

88 In the case at bar, the parties have raised questions of law relating to the application of the provisions on Quebec private international law and to whether the class action is of public order. There are a number of other arguments, however, that require an analysis of the facts in order to apply the law to this case. This is true of the attempt to identify a foreign element in the circumstances of the case. Likewise, the external nature of the arbitration clause requires not only an interpretation of the law, but also a review of the documentary and testimonial evidence introduced by the parties. According to the test discussed above, the matter should have been referred to arbitration.

89 Considering the status of the case, it would be counterproductive for this Court to refer it to arbitration, thereby exposing the parties to a new round of proceedings. It would therefore be preferable to deal with all the questions here. I have already discussed the application of art. 3149 C.C.Q. and the question of the foreign element. I will now consider the external clause issue.

6. External Nature of the Arbitration Clause

90 In 1994, the legislature introduced arts. 1435 to 1437 C.C.Q. — which lay down special rules on the validity of certain clauses typically found in contracts of adhesion or consumer contracts — into the law of contractual obligations. Although all these rules share a general purpose of protecting the weakest and most vulnerable contracting parties, they concern different types of clauses (external, illegible, incomprehensible and abusive) and are accordingly aimed at different types of abuse. For example, whereas the notion of the external clause (art. 1435 C.C.Q.) traditionally concerns contract clauses that are physically separate from the main document, that of the illegible clause (art. 1436 C.C.Q.) concerns clauses that are not separate from the main document but are, owing to their physical presentation, illegible for a reasonable person. Thus, a clause that is [TRANSLATION] “buried among a large number of other clauses” because of its location in the contract is characterized as illegible: D. Lluelles and B. Moore, Droit des obligations (2006), at p. 897; B. Lefebvre, “Le contrat d’adh√©sion” (2003), 105 R. du N. 439, at p. 479. An incomprehensible clause (art. 1436 C.C.Q.) is one that is drafted so poorly that its content is unintelligible or excessively ambiguous.

91 In the case at bar, the Union argues that, pursuant to art. 1435 C.C.Q., the arbitration clause is null because it is an external clause and because it has not been proven that Mr. Dumoulin knew of its existence. Article 1435 reads as follows:

1435. An external clause referred to in a contract is binding on the parties.

In a consumer contract or a contract of adhesion, however, an external clause is null if, at the time of formation of the contract, it was not expressly brought to the attention of the consumer or adhering party, unless the other party proves that the consumer or adhering party otherwise knew of it.

92 This provision begins with a recognition that an external clause referred to in a contract is valid. However, its purpose is to remedy abuses resulting from the inclusion by reference of clauses that one of the parties is unaware of: Civil Code Revision Office, vol. II, t. 2, at pp. 601 2; Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, vol. I, at pp. 870 71. A party wishing to apply a clause that is external to a consumer contract or a contract of adhesion must prove that it was expressly brought to the attention of the consumer or adhering party, or that the consumer or adhering party otherwise knew of it.

93 In the absence of a statutory definition, the authors have undertaken to define the external clause concept. An external clause is a contractual stipulation [TRANSLATION] “set out in a document that is separate from the agreement or instrument but that, according to a clause of this agreement, is deemed to be an integral part of it”: Baudouin et Jobin: Les obligations (6th ed. 2005), at p. 267. A clause is external if it is physically separate from the contract: Lluelles and Moore, at p. 748. A clause found on the back of a contract or in a schedule at the end of it is not an external clause, because it is an integral part of the contract; art. 1435 C.C.Q. does not apply to such a clause.

94 The case at bar is the first in which the Quebec Court of Appeal has had to consider whether a contract clause that can be accessed by means of a hyperlink in a contract entered into via the Internet can be considered to be an external clause. Previous disputes concerning the external nature of contractual stipulations have concerned paper documents.

95 Some aspects of electronic documents are covered by the law. In light of the growing number of juridical acts entered into via the Internet, the Quebec legislature has intervened and laid down rules relating to this new environment. Thus, the Act to establish a legal framework for information technology, R.S.Q., c. C 1.1, provides that documents have the same legal value whether they are paper or technology based documents (s. 5). A contract may therefore be entered into using either an electronic medium — by, for example, filling out a form on a Web page — or paper: V. Gautrais, Know your law: Guide respecting the management of technology based documents (2005), at p. 23.

96 Despite the efforts to harmonize the rules via legislation, there are legal rules that are not always easy to apply in the context of the Internet. This is true, for example, in the case of external clauses, since the traditional test of physical separation cannot be transposed without qualification to the context of electronic commerce.

97 A Web page may contain many links, each of which leads in turn to a new Web page that may itself contain many more links, and so on. Obviously, it cannot be argued that all these different but interlinked pages constitute a single document, or that the entire Web, as it scrolls down a user’s screen, is just one document. However, it is difficult to accept that the need for a single command by the user would be sufficient for a finding that the provision governing external clauses is applicable. Such an interpretation would be inconsistent with the reality of the Internet environment, where no real distinction is made between scrolling through a document and using a hyperlink. Analogously to paper documents, some Web documents contain several pages that can be accessed only by means of hyperlinks, whereas others can be viewed by scrolling down them on the computer’s screen. There is no reason to favour one configuration over the other. To determine whether clauses on the Internet are external clauses, therefore, it is necessary to consider another rule that, although not expressly mentioned in art. 1435 C.C.Q., is implied by it.

98 Thus, a number of authors have stressed that, for an external clause to be binding on the parties, it must be reasonably accessible: Lluelles and Moore, at p. 753; Baudouin et Jobin: Les obligations, at p. 268. A contracting party cannot argue that a contract clause is binding unless the other party had a reasonable opportunity to read it. For this, the other party must have had access to it. Where a contract has been negotiated and all its terms and conditions are set out in the contract itself, the problem of accessibility does not arise, since all the clauses are part of a single document. Where the contract refers to an external document, however, accessibility is an implied precondition for setting up the clause against the other party.

99 The implied precondition of accessibility is a useful tool for the analysis of an electronic document. Thus, a clause that requires operations of such complexity that its text is not reasonably accessible cannot be regarded as an integral part of the contract. Likewise, a clause contained in a document on the Internet to which a contract on the Internet refers, but for which no hyperlink is provided, will be an external clause. Access to the clause in electronic format should be no more difficult than access to its equivalent on paper. This proposition flows both from the interpretation of art. 1435 C.C.Q. and from the principle of functional equivalence that underlies the Act to establish a legal framework for information technology.

100 The evidence in the record shows that the consumer could access the page of Dell’s Web site containing the arbitration clause directly by clicking on the highlighted hyperlink entitled “Terms and Conditions of Sale”. This link reappeared on every page the consumer accessed. When the consumer clicked on the link, a page containing the terms and conditions of sale, including the arbitration clause, appeared on the screen. From this point of view, the clause was no more difficult for the consumer to access than would have been the case had he or she been given a paper copy of the entire contract on which the terms and conditions of sale appeared on the back of the first page.

101 In my view, the consumer’s access to the arbitration clause was not impeded by the configuration of the clause; to read it, he or she needed only to click once on the hyperlink to the terms and conditions of sale. The clause is therefore not an external one within the meaning of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec.

102 The Union submits that the NAF Code, too, is an external document and cannot be set up against Mr. Dumoulin, the consumer in the instant case. According to the Union, the hyperlink merely led to the home page of the NAF’s Web site, and to access the NAF Code, consumers had to pursue their searches beyond the home page. At first glance, the need to pursue a search beyond the home page seems to me to be insufficient to support a finding that the NAF Code is an external document. Without further evidence regarding access problems, I find that the argument must be rejected. Furthermore, even if the NAF Code were an external document, this argument would not be sufficient to decide the issue of the arbitrator’s jurisdiction. If the NAF Code were in fact an external clause and therefore null pursuant to art. 1435 C.C.Q., that would not affect the validity of the arbitration clause. The arbitration procedure would then simply be governed by the C.C.P.

103 In concluding, I would like to point out, relying only on the facts in the record and having heard no specific arguments on the issue of an illegible or incomprehensible arbitration clause, that I would have reached the same conclusion even if the Union had also argued that the clause was illegible or incomprehensible within the meaning of art. 1436 C.C.Q. As was mentioned above, the highlighted hyperlink appeared on every page the consumer accessed, and no evidence was adduced that could lead to the conclusion that the text was difficult to find in the document, or that it was hard to read or to understand.

104 I would also note that in this Court, the Union argued generally that the arbitration clause was abusive. This argument is based on the prohibition under art. 1437 C.C.Q. However, since no submissions were made in support of this allegation, I will simply find that the Union has not demonstrated its merits.

7. Availability of the Class Action Where There is an Arbitration Clause

105 As a separate ground in support of the argument that the arbitration clause cannot be set up against Mr. Dumoulin’s motion, the Union relies on art. 2639 C.C.Q. and submits that because this is a class action, the dispute is of public order and therefore cannot be submitted to arbitration. Thus, Dell is not entitled to request that the dispute be referred to arbitration, and the class action must be heard on the merits. In my opinion, the Union’s argument must be rejected. The class action is a procedure, and its purpose is not to create a new right.

106 The procedural framework for the class action was added to the Code of Civil Procedure in 1979. It is accepted that the class action has a social dimension: “Its purpose is to facilitate access to justice for citizens who share common problems and would otherwise have little incentive to apply to the courts on an individual basis to assert their rights” (Bisaillon v. Concordia University, [2006] 1 S.C.R. 666, 2006 SCC 19, at para. 16) or might lack the financial means to do so. From this perspective, the class action is clearly of public interest. However, the first introductory provision of Book IX of the Code of Civil Procedure — Class Action — reminds us that, as important as it may be, the class action is only a legal procedure:

999.  (. . .)

(d) “class action” means the procedure which enables one member to sue without a mandate on behalf of all the members.
(. . .)

107 This position was already accepted at the time Book IX was enacted:

[TRANSLATION] The class action is not a right (jus); it is a procedure. It is not, in itself, even a means to exercise a right, a remedy in the sense of the maxim ubi jus, ibi remedium. It is merely a special mechanism that is applied to an existing means to exercise an existing right in order to “collectivize” it.
(M. Bouchard, “L’autorisation d’exercer le recours collectif” (1980), 21 C. de D. 855, at p. 864)

The notion that the class action procedure does not create new rights has been reiterated on numerous occasions, including recently by this Court in Bisaillon, at paras. 17 and 22.

108 In the case at bar, the parties agreed to submit their disputes to binding arbitration. The effect of an arbitration agreement is recognized in Quebec law: art. 2638 C.C.Q. Obviously, if Mr. Dumoulin had brought the same action solely as an individual, the Union’s argument based on the class action being of public order could not have been advanced to prevent the court hearing the action from referring the parties to arbitration. Does the mere fact that Mr. Dumoulin instead decided to bring the matter before the courts by instituting a class action affect the admissibility of his action? In light of the reasons of LeBel J., writing for the majority in Bisaillon, at para. 17, the answer is no: “[the class action] cannot serve as a basis for legal proceedings if the various claims it covers, taken individually, would not do so”.

109 Moreover, the Union’s argument that the class action is a matter of public order that may not be submitted to arbitration has lost its force as a result of this Court’s decision in Desputeaux. In that case, one of the parties had invoked the same provision, art. 2639 C.C.Q., to argue that the dispute over ownership of the copyright in a fictitious character, Caillou, was a question of public order that could not be submitted to arbitration. The Court held that the concept of public order referred to in art. 2639 C.C.Q. must be interpreted narrowly and is limited to matters analogous to those enumerated in that provision: paras. 53 55. In the case at bar, neither Mr. Dumoulin’s hypothetical individual action nor the class action is a dispute over the status and capacity of persons, family law matters or analogous matters.

110 Consequently, the Union’s argument relating to the public order nature of the class action must fail. I must now rule on the application of Bill 48, which came into force after this appeal was heard.

8. Application of the Act to amend the Consumer Protection Act and the Act respecting the collection of certain debts

111 Bill 48 was enacted on December 14, 2006 (S.Q. 2006, c. 56). It introduces a number of measures, only one of which is relevant to the case at bar: the addition to the Consumer Protection Actof a provision on arbitration clauses. This provision reads as follows:

2. The Act is amended by inserting the following section after section 11:

“11.1. Any stipulation that obliges the consumer to refer a dispute to arbitration, that restricts the consumer’s right to go before a court, in particular by prohibiting the consumer from bringing a class action, or that deprives the consumer of the right to be a member of a group bringing a class action is prohibited.

If a dispute arises after a contract has been entered into, the consumer may then agree to refer the dispute to arbitration.”

The question that arises is whether this new provision applies to the facts of the instant case.

112 Pursuant to s. 18 of Bill 48, s. 2 came into force on December 14, 2006. Section 18 reads as follows:

18. The provisions of this Act come into force on 14 December 2006, except section 1, which comes into force on 1 April 2007, and sections 3, 5, 9 and 10, which come into force on the date or dates to be set by the Government, but not later than 15 December 2007.

Bill 48 has only one transitional provision, s. 17, which provides that the new ss. 54.8 to 54.16 of the Consumer Protection Act do not apply to contracts entered into before the coming into force of the Bill. The instant case is not one in which s. 17 is applicable. However, if ss. 17 and 18 are read together, it would seem at first glance that, aside from the provisions referred to in s. 17, Bill 48 applies to contracts entered into before its coming into force. Is this true? And is Bill 48 applicable in the case at bar?

113 Professor P. A. C√īt√© writes in The Interpretation of Legislation in Canada (3rd ed. 2000), at p. 169, that “retroactive operation of a statute is highly exceptional, whereas prospective operation is the rule”. He adds that “[a] statute has immediate effect when it applies to a legal situation that is ongoing at the moment of its commencement: the new statute governs the future developments of this situation” (p. 152). A legal situation is ongoing if the facts or effects are occurring at the time the law is being modified (p. 153). A statute of immediate effect can therefore modify the future effects of a fact that occurred before the statute came into force without affecting the prior legal situation of that fact.

114 To make it clear what is meant by an ongoing situation and one whose facts and effects have occurred in their entirety, it will be helpful to consider the example of the obligation to warrant against latent defects cited by professors P. A. C√īt√© and D. Jutras in Le droit transitoire civil: Sources annot√©es (loose leaf), at p. 2 36. This obligation comes into existence upon the conclusion of the sale, but the warranty clause does not produce tangible effects unless a problem arises with the property sold. The warranty comes into play either when the vendor is put in default or when a claim is made. Once all the effects of the warranty have occurred, the situation is no longer ongoing and the new legislation will not apply to the situation unless it is retroactive.

115 Can the facts of the case at bar be characterized as those of an ongoing legal situation? If they can, the new legislation applies. If all the effects of the situation have occurred, the new legislation will not apply to the facts.

116 The only condition for application of Dell’s arbitration clause is that a claim against Dell, or a dispute or controversy between the customer and Dell, must arise (clause 13C of the Terms and Conditions of Sale). All the facts of the legal situation had therefore occurred once Mr. Dumoulin notified Dell of his claim. Thus, all the facts giving rise to the application of the binding arbitration clause had occurred in their entirety before Bill 48 came into force.

117 Since there is nothing in Bill 48 that might lead to the conclusion that it applies retroactively, there is no reason to give it such a scope.

118 Moreover, to interpret Bill 48 as having retroactive effect would be problematic. First, retroactive operation is exceptional: C√īt√©, at pp. 114 15; R. Sullivan, Sullivan and Driedger on the Construction of Statutes (4th ed. 2002), at pp. 553 54. Where a law is ambiguous and admits of two possible interpretations, an interpretation according to which it does not have retroactive effect will be preferred: Ford v. Quebec (Attorney General), [1988] 2 S.C.R. 712, at pp. 742 45.

119 Second, I find it highly unlikely that the legislature intended that s. 2 should apply to all arbitration clauses in force before December 14, 2006. For example, neither a consumer who is a party to an arbitration that is under way nor a consumer whose claims have already been rejected by an arbitrator should be able to rely on s. 2 and argue that the arbitration clause binding him or her and the merchant is invalid in order to request a stay of proceedings or to have the unfavourable arbitration award set aside. Failing a clear indication to the contrary, when a dispute is submitted for a decision, the decision maker must apply the law as it stands at the time the facts giving rise to the right occurred.

120 I accordingly conclude that since the facts triggering the application of the arbitration clause had already occurred before s. 2 of Bill 48 came into force, this provision does not apply to the facts of the case at bar.

9. Disposition

121 For these reasons, I would allow the appeal, reverse the Court of Appeal’s judgment, refer Mr. Dumoulin’s claim to arbitration and dismiss the motion for authorization to institute a class action, with costs.

The reasons of Bastarache, LeBel and Fish JJ. were delivered by

BASTARACHE AND LEBEL JJ. (dissenting)

I. Introduction

122 In this appeal, our Court must decide whether an arbitration clause in an Internet consumer contract bars access to a class action procedure in the province of Quebec. For the reasons which follow, we hold that the clause at issue is of no effect and cannot be set up against the consumer who seeks the authorization to initiate a class action. As a result, we would dismiss the appeal.

II. Background

123 Over the weekend between April 4, 2003 and April 7, 2003, Dell showed some erroneous prices on one page of its Web site, the “shopping page” for its Axim X5 line of handheld computers. On this specific page, the Axim X5 300 MHz and 400 MHz were announced at a price of $89 and $118 respectively. It appears that the actual pricing should have read $379 and $549 respectively and that the error was due to a technical problem with one of Dell’s database systems.

124 The error was discovered by Dell on Saturday, April 5th. Dell immediately tried to correct it by erecting an electronic barrier to block access to the faulty page through the generally publicized homepage www.Dell.ca. However, Dell overlooked the fact that it was still possible to access the blocked page through a “deep-link”, a direct hyperlink that permits Web users to have access to a particular page without having to go through the Web site’s homepage. It appears that many people were able to access the faulty page through this means and that an unusually high number of Axim X5 handheld computers were ordered at the erroneous prices over the weekend. The respondent Dumoulin is one of the persons who placed an order in this way, having ordered, on April 7th, an Axim X5 300 MHz at the erroneous price of $89 after having accessed the shopping page of the Axim X5 handheld computers through its deep-link.

125 On Monday, April 7th, at 9:30 a.m., the technical problem with the shopping page was fixed and access through the homepage was re-established at 2:30 p.m. Later that day, Dell published a correction notice on its Web site informing customers of the pricing error and of the fact that all orders for the Axim X5 handheld computers with incorrect pricing would not be processed.

126 The following day, Dumoulin received an e-mail informing him of the pricing error and also that his order would not be processed. He answered by putting Dell on notice to honour its advertised sale price. His request having been denied, Union des consommateurs, on behalf of Dumoulin, decided to file a motion in the Superior Court to be authorized to institute a class action.

127 Dell contested the motion by raising a declinatory exception to the Quebec Superior Court’s jurisdiction based on the fact that the terms and conditions of the sale contained the following arbitration agreement:

Arbitration. ANY CLAIM, DISPUTE, OR CONTROVERSY (WHETHER IN CONTRACT, TORT, OR OTHERWISE, WHETHER PREEXISTING, PRESENT OR FUTURE, AND INCLUDING STATUTORY, COMMON LAW, INTENTIONAL TORT AND EQUITABLE CLAIMS CAPABLE IN LAW OF BEING SUBMITTED TO BINDING ARBITRATION) AGAINST DELL, its agents, employees, officers, directors, successors, assigns or affiliates (collectively for purposes of this paragraph, “Dell”) arising from or relating to this Agreement, its interpretation, or the breach, termination or validity thereof, the relationships between the parties, whether pre existing, present or future, (including, to the full extent permitted by applicable law, relationships with third parties who are not signatories to this Agreement), Dell’s advertising, or any related purchase SHALL BE RESOLVED EXCLUSIVELY AND FINALLY BY BINDING ARBITRATION ADMINISTERED BY THE NATIONAL ARBITRATION FORUM (“NAF”) under its Code of Procedure and any specific procedures for the resolution of small claims and/or consumer disputes then in effect (available via the Internet at http://www.arb forum.com/, or via telephone at 1 800 474 2371). The arbitration will be limited solely to the dispute or controversy between Customer and Dell. Any award of the arbitrator(s) shall be final and binding on each of the parties, and may be entered as a judgment in any court of competent jurisdiction. Information may be obtained and claims may be filed with the NAF at P.O. Box 50191, Minneapolis, MN 55405, or by e mail at file@arb forum.com, or by online filing at http://www.arb forum.com/.
(Appellant’s Record, vol. III, at p. 384, Dell’s Online Policies, Terms and Conditions of Sale (Canada), clause 13C)

Dell argued that on account of this clause, Dumoulin’s dispute had to be submitted to compulsory arbitration.

III. Judicial History

128 The Superior Court dismissed the declinatory exception (J.E. 2004-457, [2004] Q.J. No. 155 (QL)). Langlois J. found that the arbitration agreement provided for an arbitration administered by the National Arbitration Forum (“NAF”), a U.S. based institute governed by American law, and that the agreement purported to derogate from art. 3149 of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec, S.Q. 1991, c. 64 (“C.C.Q.”), which provides that the waiver of the jurisdiction of Quebec authorities cannot be set up against a consumer. In reaching this decision, Langlois J. followed an earlier decision of the Court of Appeal in Dominion Bridge Corp. v. Knai, [1998] R.J.Q. 321, where it was held that an agreement to arbitrate an employment dispute in a foreign jurisdiction could not be set up against the worker under art. 3149 C.C.Q.

129 The Quebec Court of Appeal dismissed the appeal, but on different grounds ([2005] R.J.Q. 1448, 2005 QCCA 570). Writing for a unanimous bench, Lemelin J. (ad hoc) overturned Langlois J. on the basis that, pursuant to Rule 32A of the National Arbitration Forum Code of Procedure (“NAF Code”), the seat of the arbitration could have been located in Quebec and that the factual situation was on that basis distinguishable from the one in Dominion Bridge. However, Lemelin J. did conclude that the arbitration agreement was null on another basis. Having found that the “Terms and Conditions of Sale” in which the agreement was included was itself an external clause pursuant to art. 1435 C.C.Q., she further found that the arbitration agreement and its rules of procedure were not expressly brought to the attention of Dumoulin and that Dell had not established that the consumer had otherwise gained knowledge of it. She thus concluded that the arbitration agreement was null and that the Superior Court had not lost its jurisdiction over the class action proceedings.
IV. Analysis

A. Introduction

130 In this case, we are dealing with an arbitration clause inserted into a consumer contract of adhesion. The primary question raised by this appeal can be stated in the following terms: did the courts below err in law by refusing to refer the parties to arbitration? Before analysing this question, however, it is helpful to first discuss the nature of exclusive contractual arbitration clauses, the history of their recognition in Quebec law, and the principles that inform the interpretation of the rules relating to arbitration.

(1) The Nature of Exclusive Contractual Arbitration Clauses: a Jurisdiction Clause

131 There are two types of contractual arbitration clauses. A complete undertaking to arbitrate, or an “exclusive arbitration clause”, is that by which the parties undertake in advance to submit to arbitration any dispute which may arise regarding their contract, and which specifies that the award made will be final and binding on the parties. This may be contrasted with an arbitration clause that is purely optional (see Zodiak International Productions Inc. v. Polish People’s Republic, [1983] 1 S.C.R. 529, at p. 533).

132 Exclusive arbitration clauses operate to create a “private jurisdiction” that implicates the loss of jurisdiction of state-appointed forums for dispute resolution, such as ordinary courts and administrative tribunals, rendering contractual arbitration both different and exclusive of the later entities (see J. E. C. Brierley, “Arbitration Agreements Articles 2638-2643”, in Reform of the Civil Code(1993), vol. 3B, at pp. 1-3 and 10). Contractual arbitration has also been described as creating a “private justice system” for the parties: [TRANSLATION] “From a theoretical standpoint, arbitration is a private justice system that ordinarily arises out of an agreement. Thus, it has a contractual source and an adjudicative function” (see S. Thuilleaux in L’arbitrage commercial au Qu√©bec: Droit interne — Droit international priv√© (1991), at p. 5 (footnotes omitted)).

133 What makes contractual arbitration a “private jurisdiction” or “private justice system” is the degree of freedom the parties have in choosing the manner in which their dispute will be resolved:

Arbitration is therefore the settling of disputes between parties who agree not to go before the courts, but to accept as final the decision of experts of their choice, in a place of their choice, usually subject to laws agreed upon in advance and usually under rules which avoid much of the formality, niceties, proof and procedure required by the courts.
(W. Tetley, International Conflict of Laws: Common, Civil and Maritime (1994), at p. 390)

Parties to contractual arbitration are free to choose the laws governing their agreement to arbitrate, the law of the arbitral proceedings, the law of the subject matter under dispute, as well as the rules of conflict applicable to all of the above. In addition, the above four laws need not be the same and may differ from the law of the place of arbitration. Thus, contractual arbitration proceedings can be seen to be delocalized from the jurisdiction where the arbitration is held (see Tetley, at pp. 391-92).

134 One of the major differences between courts and arbitration is that contractual arbitrators are not representatives of the state, but, rather, are privately appointed. On account of this, whether an arbitration is situated in Quebec or not, in order for an arbitral award to be legally enforceable, the laws of Quebec require the decision to first be recognized by Quebec courts. There is no difference here with how judgments from foreign courts must first be recognized before having force of law in the province. This is noted by R. Tremblay in “La nature du diff√©rend et la fonction de l’arbitre consensuel” (1988), 91 R. du N. 246, at p. 252:

[TRANSLATION] However, care must be taken not to confuse the judicial function with the arbitration function. Judges derive their jurisdiction from a state’s foundational institutions. Arbitrators, on the other hand, derive their jurisdiction from the mutual agreement of the parties. The difference is an important one. An arbitrator is chosen and appointed by the parties and is not a representative of the state. Arbitrators may rule on disputes, but their decisions are not enforceable unless they are homologated; unlike a judgment, an arbitrator’s decision is not enforceable on its own.

135 Exclusive arbitration and forum selection clauses operate very similarly. The effect of both is to derogate from the jurisdiction of ordinary courts, who would otherwise have jurisdiction to hear the matter. Many authors of conflict of laws’ textbooks simply refer to these clauses, without distinguishing between them, as “jurisdiction clauses”: see for example J. G. Collier, Conflict of Laws (3rd ed. 2001), at p. 96. In the common law provinces, courts will stay their jurisdiction in the presence of either a valid forum selection or arbitration clause. The power to do so stems from the courts’ inherent jurisdiction; however, different statutes provide for certain factors that should be taken into account in determining whether to grant the stay depending on whether the court is faced with a forum selection or a domestic or international arbitration clause. Quebec has also tended to treat exclusive arbitration and forum selection clauses analogously, the history of which we will now turn to.

(2) Recognition of Jurisdiction Clauses in Quebec Law

136 Prior to the coming into force of the C.C.Q., the rules on jurisdiction of Quebec courts were not codified. Quebec courts relied on art. 27 of the Civil Code of Lower Canada (“C.C.L.C.”) and art. 68 of the Quebec Code of Civil Procedure, R.S.Q., c. C-25 (“C.C.P.”), to delineate their jurisdiction in cases where it was challenged: see Masson v. Thompson, [1994] R.J.Q. 1032 (Sup. Ct.). Article 27 C.C.L.C. provided that aliens although not resident in Lower Canada could be sued in Quebec courts “for the fulfilment of obligations contracted by them in foreign countries”. Article 68 C.C.P., which is still in force today, provides the domestic rules for determining in which judicial district of Quebec a personal action can be started. Relying on the general principles set out in this section, and art. 27 C.C.L.C., Quebec courts have delineated a body of jurisprudential rules deciding when Quebec courts have jurisdiction to hear an action.

137 Prior to its amendment in 1992, the opening phrase of art. 68 C.C.P. stated: “Subject to the provisions of articles 70, 71, 74 and 75, and notwithstanding any agreement to the contrary, a purely personal action may be instituted . . .”. This was interpreted by Quebec courts to be a prohibition against intentional derogation through contract from the jurisdiction of Quebec courts through forum selection and arbitration clauses: see S. Thuilleaux and D. M. Proctor, “L’application des conventions d’arbitrage au Canada: une difficile coexistence entre les comp√©tences judiciaire et arbitrale” (1992), 37McGill L.J. 470, at pp. 477 78.

138 Then came the 1983 decision of this Court in Zodiak International Productions, where a party to a contract submitted to arbitration in Warsaw, but having lost, commenced a fresh action in the Quebec Superior Court against his co contractor. Noting the tension between art. 68 C.C.P. and contractual arbitration clauses, the Court held that the Quebec legislator had nonetheless clearly intended to permit such clauses by introducing art. 951 C.C.P., which states: “An undertaking to arbitrate must be set out in writing.” Faced with this provision, Chouinard J., for the Court, cited with approval the words of Pratte J. in Syndicat de Normandin Lumber Ltd. v. The “Angelic Power”, [1971] F.C. 263 (T.D.), who stated: “. . . I do not see how the Quebec legislator could have regulated the form and effect of an agreement whose validity he does not admit” (p. 539). Shortly after this decision, in 1986, the Quebec legislator introduced amendments to the C.C.L.C. and the C.C.P. providing detailed rules on the validity, form and procedure governing contractual arbitration. (Today, these rules can be found in the specific chapter on arbitration in the Book of Obligations of the C.C.Q., these being arts. 2638 to 2643, and in Book VII (on Arbitrations) of the C.C.P.)

139 Following these changes, an inconsistency could be noted in the Quebec legislator’s approach to forum selection clauses and arbitration clauses. By operation of art. 68 C.C.P., the former were still held to be invalid: see Thuilleaux and Proctor, at pp. 477 78. It would seem that this difference was accidental rather than intentional. Draft bills from as early as 1977 assimilated forum selection and arbitration clauses. For example, art. 67 of Book Nine of the Draft Civil Code of 1977 provided the following situations where Quebec authorities could refuse to recognize foreign decisions:

67 On application by the defendant, the jurisdiction of the court of origin is not recognized by the courts of Québec when:

1. the law of Québec, either because of the subject matter or by virtue of an agreement between the parties, gives exclusive jurisdiction to its courts to hear the claim which gave rise to the foreign decision;

2. the law of Québec, either because of the subject matter or by virtue of an agreement between the parties, recognizes the exclusive jurisdiction of another court; or

3. the law of Québec recognizes an agreement by which exclusive jurisdiction is conferred upon arbitrators.

This oversight was corrected, however, through the introduction of art. 3148 in Book Ten of the new C.C.Q. The second paragraph of this provision clarifies the intention of the Quebec legislator to assimilate the effect of forum selection and arbitration clauses. It provides that “a Qu√©bec authority has no jurisdiction where the parties, by agreement, have chosen to submit all existing or future disputes between themselves relating to a specific legal relationship to a foreign authority or to an arbitrator . . .”. Simultaneously to this provision being passed, the opening phrase of art. 68 C.C.P. was amended to remove the prohibition on contractual derogation from the jurisdiction of Quebec courts and to direct matters concerning the international jurisdiction of Quebec authorities to Book Ten of the C.C.Q. It now reads: “Subject to the provisions of this Chapter and the provisions of Book Ten of the Civil Code of Qu√©bec . . .”.

140 Perhaps owing more to inadvertence than intention, some minor differences remain in the treatment of these two types of jurisdiction clauses in Quebec law. For example, there is no parallel provision to art. 940.1 C.C.P. for forum selection clauses, as there is for arbitration clauses, which permits parties to contest the validity of such clauses. This provision was introduced in the 1986 amendments to the C.C.P. and it provides that Quebec courts shall refer the parties to arbitration unless the case has been inscribed on the roll or it finds the agreement null, of which more will be said further below. Article 3148, para. 2 alone does not provide for challenging the validity of jurisdiction clauses. This has led to some criticism of the current set up of the rules on jurisdiction in the doctrine. For example, G. Saumier, in “Les objections √† la comp√©tence internationale des tribunaux qu√©b√©cois: nature et proc√©dure” (1998), 58 R. du B. 145, criticizes the discrepancies between the rules applicable to forum selection clauses and arbitration clauses: [TRANSLATION] “there is no justification, where the parties have agreed in advance on the appropriate forum for settling their disputes, for making a distinction between an arbitral tribunal and a state court” (p. 161). Saumier advocates uniform rules between the two, and in this respect, urges an overhaul of the rules on international competence of Quebec authorities in one comprehensive set of rules:

[TRANSLATION] The fundamental reform of the rules of private international law brought about by the adoption of the Civil Code of Québec did not include a revision of the procedural rules applicable in matters of international jurisdiction. Thus, a party wanting to object to the international jurisdiction of a Quebec court must deal with a multitude of statutory schemes relating to time limits and waiver and with precedents that are not easily reconciled. . . . It is therefore imperative to adopt rules tailored to the international context that reflect the interests both of the parties and of the state judicial system and the arbitration system. [pp. 164-65]

See also the 2000 report of the Comité de révision de la procédure civile which similarly advocates the creation of one coherent and comprehensive chapter on private international law to be situated in the C.C.P., which would include, among other things, the rules on Arbitrations currently located in Book VII of the C.C.P. (see Comité de révision de la procédure civile, La révision de la procédure civile (février 2000), Document de consultation, at pp. 113-14).

141 This short historical overview demonstrates, in our view, that one should not attach any significance to the structure of the C.C.Q. or the C.C.P. when interpreting the substantive provisions under review in this appeal. The coherence of the regime is not dependent on the particular Book of the C.C.P. that deals with arbitrations, or the particular title and Book of the C.C.Q. in which is found art. 3149. The Civil Code constitutes itself an ensemble which is not meant to be parcelled out into chapters and sections that are not interrelated. The way in which the law is presented in the Code corresponds to a methodology and a logic; it is not meant to insulate one substantive provision from all others. As pointed out by J. E. C. Brierley and R. A. Macdonald in Quebec Civil Law: An Introduction to Quebec Private Law (1993), at p. 25, “the codification of the private law of Lower Canada was, primarily, a technical reordering of a complex body of norms that was intended to make this private law more accessible in both its language and substance to legal professionals . . .”. From its very inception, the Code’s interpretation depended not on this reordering but on its place in the legal order and its relation to the theory of sources it presupposes (p. 97). Indeed, Brierley and Macdonald write, after having noted the assumptions as to form that underpin the Code: “[t]o assume that codal provisions are non-redundant is to assume that they are to be mutually cross-referenced within the Code and that each article must be read in conjunction with all others, regardless of their placement in the Code” (pp. 102-3). The Code is of course taxonomic; this invites to conceptual characterization, to “identifying the extensions of which a concept is susceptible, all the more so since these headings are themselves part of the enacted law” (p. 104). Moreover, “the best guide to ascertaining the legislative intention will still be the Code itself, read as a whole . . .” (p. 139). This is why headings will be considered indicators of scope and meaning and other codal articles will help fix the meaning of any given text (p. 139).

(3) The Principle of Primacy of the Autonomy of the Parties

142 Quebec’s acceptance of jurisdiction clauses over the past two decades is rooted in the principle of primacy of the autonomy of the parties. This has recently been confirmed by our Court inDesputeaux v. √Čditions Chouette (1987) inc., [2003] 1 S.C.R. 178, 2003 SCC 17, with respect to agreements to submit a dispute to an arbitral tribunal, and GreCon Dimter inc. v. J.R. Normand inc., [2005] 2 S.C.R. 401, 2005 SCC 46, with respect to agreements to submit it to a foreign authority.

143 In Desputeaux, our Court recognized that the limits to the autonomy of the contracting parties to choose to submit a dispute to arbitration had to be given a restrictive interpretation. More specifically, as will be discussed in further detail below, we held that the notion of “public order” at art. 2639, para. 1 C.C.Q. had to be given a narrow interpretation. Furthermore, we held that legislation merely identifying the courts which, within the judicial system, will have jurisdiction over a particular subject matter should not be interpreted as excluding the possibility of arbitration, except if it was clearly the legislator’s intention to do so. In reaching these conclusions, we notably had regard to the legislative policy that now accepts arbitration as a valid form of dispute resolution and, moreover, seeks to promote its use.

144 Both art. 3148, para. 2 C.C.Q. and art. 940.1 C.C.P. can be interpreted as giving practical effect to the principle of primacy of the autonomy of the parties that has characterized the development of the law of arbitration in Quebec in the last two decades. The provisions purport most notably to promote legal certainty for the parties by enabling them to provide in advance for the forum to which their disputes will have to be submitted. They are also consistent with the international movement towards harmonizing the rules of jurisdiction.

145 This movement towards harmonization can be explained by the importance of legal certainty for commercial and international transactions. As noted by J. A. Talpis in “Choice of Law and Forum Selection Clauses under the New Civil Code of Quebec” (1994), 96 R. du N. 183, at pp. 188-89:

Th[e] essential goal of predictability was surely on the mind of the drafters of the new Civil Code of Quebec, as it reaffirmed and extended the theory of party autonomy, a theory clearly among the foremost general principles of law recognized by civilized nations. It is a principle which makes the express or implied intention of the parties determinative of the legal system by which even the essential validity of a contract should be governed. In Quebec, it has a lengthy history and a great deal of current vitality.

The fact is that considerations of commercial convenience and of conflicts theory weigh heavily in favor of this theory which rests mainly upon the interest of the parties to the contract, but is supported by those of the commercial community and of the courts as well. Consequently, it was considered by the legislature to be in the general social interest to provide a legal system favorable to the predictable resolution of the conflict of laws.

This clear intention of the Quebec legislator was acknowledged by our Court in GreCon Dimter, where we concluded that the fact that an action was incidental to a principal action heard by a Quebec court was not sufficient to trump an agreement to submit any claim arising from the contract to a foreign authority. More specifically, we concluded that art. 3148, para. 2 C.C.Q. was to be given primacy over art. 3139 C.C.Q.

(4) The Limits on the Autonomy of the Parties

146 Naturally, the primacy of the autonomy of contracting parties permitting them to choose in advance the forum for resolving their disputes is not without limits. The Quebec legislator has restricted it in many different ways.

147 We noted the limits on the expression of the autonomy of the parties to submit their disputes to a foreign authority in GreCon Dimter, pursuant to art. 3148, para. 2. First, art. 3151 C.C.Q. confers to the Quebec authorities exclusive jurisdiction to hear in first instance all actions founded on civil liability for damage suffered as a result of exposure to or the use of raw materials originating in Quebec. Second, art. 3149 C.C.Q., which confers jurisdiction to the Quebec authorities to hear an action involving a consumer contract or an employment contract if the consumer or worker has his domicile or residence in Quebec, states that the waiver of such jurisdiction by the consumer or worker may not be set up against him. The language of both provisions is clear with regard to the intention of the legislature to limit the autonomy of the parties.

148 Given the various location of rules relating to arbitration in the C.C.Q., the definition of the limits on the autonomy of the parties to submit their disputes to an arbitral tribunal gives rise to some uncertainty, as illustrated by this case. The general provision is art. 2639 C.C.Q. which states that “[d]isputes over the status and capacity of persons, family matters or other matters of public order may not be submitted to arbitration”. While it is the only exception created in the chapter on “Arbitrations”, art. 2639 C.C.Q. is not the only legislative exception to arbitrability. This was recognized by Brierley when writing on the new chapter on arbitration in the Civil Code:

It is possible that an implicit legislative intention to exclude arbitration can be detected, even if it has not been expressly forbidden (for example, when the matter is reserved for resolution to the courts or quasi-judicial state agencies). An imperative attribution of competence in certain areas might in fact contain a rule of public order which excludes arbitration. [Emphasis added.]
(Brierley, Reform of the Civil Code, at p. 4)

Furthermore, in order to be enforceable, an arbitration agreement has to be evidenced in writing under art. 2640 C.C.Q. and must otherwise be in compliance with all the conditions of formation of a contract. This latter point is true even when the arbitration agreement is contained in a contract since it is then considered to be a separate agreement pursuant to art. 2642 C.C.Q. The comments of the Minister of Justice on this article specifically recognize that an arbitration agreement is subject to the general rules of contract and can be challenged before the courts on the same basis as any other contract (Commentaires du ministre de la Justice (1993), vol. II). As well, since arbitration clauses raise primarily a question of jurisdiction, there is the additional problem of which jurisdiction (the arbitrator or Quebec courts) ought to decide whether any of these limits apply in a given case. This brings us back to the primary issue raised by this case.

B. Issues Raised by this Case

149 On the primary question of whether the lower courts erred in refusing to refer the parties to arbitration, it is not contested by the respondents that, if the arbitration agreement is valid and applicable to the dispute, the courts have no discretion and must not refuse to refer the parties to arbitration. On that point, art. 940.1 C.C.P. seems clear: if the parties have an agreement to arbitrate on the matter of the dispute, on the application of either of the parties, the court shall refer the parties to arbitration, unless the case has been inscribed on the roll or the court finds the agreement to be null. It is well established that, by using the term “shall”, the legislator has indicated that the court has no discretion to refuse, on the application of either of the parties, to refer the case to arbitration when the appropriate conditions are met (see GreCon Dimter, at para. 44; La Sarre (Ville de) v. Gabriel Aub√© inc., [1992] R.D.J. 273 (C.A.), at p. 277). On a plain reading of art. 940.1 C.C.P., these conditions appear to be threefold: (i) the parties must have an arbitration agreement on the matter of the dispute; (ii) the case must not have been inscribed on the roll; and (iii) the court must not find the agreement to be null. Regarding the latter condition, it appears obvious to us that the reference to the nullity of the agreement is also meant to cover the situation where the arbitration agreement cannot, without being null, be set up against the applicant.

150 It is also well established that the effect of a valid undertaking to arbitrate is to remove the dispute from the jurisdiction of the ordinary courts of law (per Zodiak International Productions, art. 940.1 C.C.P. and art. 3148, para. 2 C.C.Q.). It is also accepted that jurisdiction over the individual actions that form the basis of a class action is a prerequisite to the exercise of jurisdiction over the proceedings (Bisaillon v. Concordia University, [2006] 1 S.C.R. 666, 2006 SCC 19). There is consequently no question that, if the arbitration agreement is valid and relates to the dispute, the Superior Court has no jurisdiction to hear the case and must refer the parties to arbitration.

151 In the case at bar, it is not contested by the respondents that the first two conditions for the application of art. 940.1 are met. What is at issue, though, is whether the Court of Appeal erred in law by refusing to refer the parties to arbitration on the basis that the arbitration agreement was null or cannot otherwise be set up against Dumoulin.

152 Many different grounds have been raised in order to demonstrate that the arbitration clause in the case at bar is null or otherwise cannot be set up against Dumoulin. It has notably been argued: (1) that the arbitration agreement cannot be set up against Dumoulin, a consumer, because it constitutes a waiver of the jurisdiction of the Quebec authorities under art. 3149 C.C.Q.; and (2) that it is null, (a) because it is over a consumer dispute which is in and of itself a matter of public order under art. 2639 C.C.Q.; (b) because it constitutes a waiver of the jurisdiction of the Superior Court over class actions and that such a waiver is contrary to public order under art. 2639 C.C.Q.; (c) because Dumoulin did not really consent to it as it was imposed on him through a contract of adhesion; (d) because it is abusive and offends art. 1437 C.C.Q.; and (e) because it is found in an external clause that was not expressly brought to the attention of Dumoulin as required under art. 1435 C.C.Q. Each of these arguments represents a sub-issue in this case and will be dealt with separately in section D below. But before we turn to the study of these sub-issues of the case, it is necessary to address two preliminary questions.

153 First, we have to decide whether the amendments the Quebec legislator recently brought to the Consumer Protection Act, R.S.Q., c. P-40.1 (“C.P.A.”), apply to this case. Bill 48, An Act to amend the Consumer Protection Act and the Act respecting the collection of certain debts, 2nd Sess., 37th Leg. (now S.Q. 2006, c. 56), was assented to on December 14, 2006, the day after the hearing of this case before our Court. Section 2 of Bill 48 reads as follow:

2. The Act [the Consumer Protection Act] is amended by inserting the following section after section 11:

“11.1. Any stipulation that obliges the consumer to refer a dispute to arbitration, that restricts the consumer’s right to go before a court, in particular by prohibiting the consumer from bringing a class action, or that deprives the consumer of the right to be a member of a group bringing a class action is prohibited.

If a dispute arises after a contract has been entered into, the consumer may then agree to refer the dispute to arbitration.”

It is not disputed that, if this amendment applies to the case at bar, there would be no need to address the other sub-issues as the third condition for the application of art. 940.1 C.C.P. would clearly not be met.

154 Second, we have to determine the scope of the analysis a court should conduct under art. 940.1 C.C.P. in order to “find” whether the arbitration agreement is null. The appellant argues that this analysis should only be prima facie; the respondents argue it should be comprehensive. Depending on the answer to be given to this question, it is possible that only some of the grounds of nullity invoked by the respondents can be properly raised at the stage of a referral application, whereas the other grounds should be more appropriately left to the arbitrator to decide, subject to subsequent review by the courts.

C. Preliminary Questions

(1) The Impact of Bill 48 on the Case at Bar

155 The main provision in Bill 48 relevant to this appeal is s. 2. It amends the C.P.A. by prohibiting and voiding any contractual clauses which oblige a consumer to submit a dispute to arbitration. Pursuant to the C.P.A. as amended, an arbitration agreement can validly be concluded by a merchant and a consumer only after a dispute has arisen. It is conceded that, if this amendment applies to the case at bar, the appeal should be dismissed as the arbitration agreement on which the appellant’s declinatory exception is founded would clearly be of no effect. It should be noted that our interpretation of art. 3149 C.C.Q. achieves the same result as Bill 48. It might be argued that the introduction of Bill 48 is an indication that the Legislative Assembly did not share our view of art. 3149. Our response to this is that it is much more likely that the misinterpretation of art. 3149 in obiter in Dominion Bridge, and in the Court of Appeal in this case, caused the legislator to act swiftly in order to ensure the protection of consumers in the province.

156 Section 18 of Bill 48 provides that its provisions come into force on December 14, 2006, except for certain specific provisions that come into force at later dates (between April 1, 2007 and December 15, 2007). Since s. 2 of Bill 48 is now in force, the question before us is whether it has any effect on the pending case.

157 Under well-established principles of statutory interpretation, in general, new laws affecting substantive matters do not apply to pending cases. It is also well recognized that a new law will be applicable to a pending case if it clearly expresses an intent to retroactively modify the substantive rights at issue. Professor C√īt√© states the applicable principles in the following manner:

In general, new statutes affecting substantive matters do not apply to pending cases, even those under appeal. Since the judicial process is generally declaratory of rights, the judge declares the rights of the parties as they existed when the cause of action arose: the day of the tort, of the conclusion of the contract, the commission of the crime, etc. However, a new statute bringing substantive modification is applicable to a pending case if it retroactively modifies the law applicable on the day of the tort, the contract, the crime, etc. A pending case, even under appeal, can therefore be affected by a retroactive statute, and even by one enacted while proceedings are pending in appeal.
(P.-A. C√īt√©, The Interpretation of Legislation in Canada (3rd ed. 2000), at p. 179)

158 The rule is different for new laws affecting procedural matters. Such laws have immediate effect and apply to pending cases. As Professor C√īt√© notes, this does not mean that such laws have retroactive effect:

Because procedural provisions apply to pending cases, the term “retroactivity” has been used by analogy with the effect of statutes affecting substantive rights. But procedural enactments do not govern the law that the judge declares to have existed: they only deal with the procedures used to assert a right, and with the rules for conduct of the hearing. It is normal that a statute dealing with trial procedure will govern the future conduct of all trials carried out under its authority. This is not retroactivity but simply immediate and prospective application. [pp. 179-80]

159 We therefore have to decide whether s. 2 of Bill 48 is a provision affecting substantive or procedural matters. If it affects substantive matters, we will further have to decide whether it has retroactive effects.

160 In our view, s. 2 of Bill 48 is a provision dealing with substantive matters as it affects a contractual right of the parties: the right of a party to have his claim referred to arbitration, to the exclusion of the courts. It is true that, in some respects, this right resembles a procedural right: it determines how a right will be asserted. That said, it is obviously more than just a procedural right. It affects the jurisdiction of the courts and “it is well established that jurisdiction is not a procedural matter” (Royal Bank of Canada v. Concrete Column Clamps (1961) Ltd., [1971] S.C.R. 1038, at p. 1040; see also C√īt√©, at p. 183).

161 Furthermore, we are of the view that s. 2 of Bill 48 has no retroactive effect. Unless a statute provides otherwise, expressly or by necessary implication, it is not to be construed as having such effect. Wright J.’s dictum in In re Athlumney, [1898] 2 Q.B. 547, at pp. 551-52, still adequately reflects the law on this issue:

Perhaps no rule of construction is more firmly established than this — that a retrospective operation is not to be given to a statute so as to impair an existing right or obligation, otherwise than as regards matter of procedure, unless that effect cannot be avoided without doing violence to the language of the enactment. If the enactment is expressed in language which is fairly capable of either interpretation, it ought to be construed as prospective only.
(See also Gustavson Drilling (1964) Ltd. v. Minister of National Revenue, [1977] 1 S.C.R. 271, at p. 279.)

162 Nothing in Bill 48 leads us to think that its s. 2 should be read as having retroactive effect. The transitional provisions do not state it and cannot be interpreted in such a way. Therefore, the general presumption against the retroactivity of the statute has not been rebutted and s. 2 of Bill 48 should not be interpreted as having the effect of rendering null the arbitration agreement at bar as this agreement was concluded before the coming into force of the provision.

(2) The Scope of the Analysis Under Art. 940.1 C.C.P.

163 The appellant relies on the competence-competence principle in arguing that the extent of the review that a court should conduct under art. 940.1 C.C.P. should be limited to a prima facieinvestigation. This principle has been described as having two components (see e.g., E. Gaillard and J. Savage, eds., Fouchard, Gaillard, Goldman on International Commercial Arbitration (1999), at p. 401). First, the competence-competence principle stands for the proposition that the arbitrators have the power to rule on their own jurisdiction. This principle is well established in our law and has received legislative recognition in art. 943 C.C.P. More importantly for present purposes, it is a rule of chronological priority under which the arbitrators must have the first opportunity to rule on their jurisdiction, subject to subsequent review by the courts. This aspect of the competence-competence principle is still subject to disagreement and gives rise to different applications.

164 In trying to determine the scope of this principle, one has to keep in mind the difference between the types of challenges that can be brought against an arbitrator’s jurisdiction. They fall into two main categories. The first category encompasses the challenges regarding the validity of the arbitration agreement involving the parties. The second category encompasses the challenges regarding the applicability of the arbitration agreement to the specific dispute.

165 It is relatively well accepted that the competence-competence principle applies to the jurisdictional challenges regarding the applicability of the arbitration agreement (see e.g., Kingsway Financial Services Inc. v. 118997 Canada inc., [1999] Q.J. No. 5922 (QL) (C.A.)). In any challenge to arbitral jurisdiction alleging that the dispute does not fall within the scope of the arbitration clause, it has been established that courts ought to send the matter to arbitration and allow the arbitrator to decide the question, unless it is obvious that the dispute is not within the arbitrator’s jurisdiction. (See L. Y. Fortier, “Delimiting the Spheres of Judicial and Arbitral Power: ‘Beware, My Lord, of Jealousy’” (2001), 80 Can. Bar Rev. 143, at p. 146; P. Bienvenu, “The Enforcement of International Arbitration Agreements and Referral Applications in the NAFTA Region” (1999), 59 R. du B. 705, at p. 721; J. B. Casey and J. Mills, Arbitration Law of Canada: Practice and Procedure (2005), at p. 64; L. Marquis, “La comp√©tence arbitrale: une place au soleil ou √† l’ombre du pouvoir judiciaire” (1990), 21 R.D.U.S. 303, at pp. 318-19.) However, whether courts ought to generally send the matter to arbitration when the validity of the arbitration agreement itself is challenged, is more controversial.

166 In some cases, the courts have recognized that the arbitrators should be the first to rule on the validity of the arbitration agreement and have referred the parties to arbitration (see e.g., World LLC v. Parenteau & Parenteau Int’l Inc., [1998] Q.J. No. 736 (QL) (Sup. Ct.); Automobiles Duclos inc. v. Ford du Canada lt√©e, [2001] R.J.Q. 173 (Sup. Ct.); Simbol Test Systems Inc. v. Gnubi Communications Inc., [2002] Q.J. No. 437 (QL) (Sup. Ct.); Sonox Sia v. Albury Grain Sales Inc., [2005] Q.J. No. 9998 (QL) (Sup. Ct.)). In other cases, the courts have undertaken a comprehensive review of the validity of the arbitration clause before referring, or refusing to refer, the case to arbitration (see e.g., Martineau v. Verreault, [2001] Q.J. No. 3103 (QL) (Sup. Ct.); Chass√© v. Union canadienne, compagnie d’assurance, [1999] R.R.A. 165 (Sup. Ct.); Lemieux v. 9110 9595 Qu√©bec inc., [2004] Q.J. No. 9489 (QL) (C.Q.); Joseph v. Assurances g√©n√©rales des Caisses Desjardins inc., SOQUIJ AZ 99036669 (C.Q.); Bureau v. Beauce Soci√©t√© mutuelle d’assurance g√©n√©rale, SOQUIJ AZ 96035006 (C.Q.); Richard Gagn√© v. Poir√©, [2006] Q.J. No. 9350 (QL), 2006 QCCS 4980).

167 The difficulties caused by the lack of clarity in the drafting of the C.C.P. now confirms the need for a full review of the matter in order to determine the appropriate approach to the exercise of the supervisory power of the Superior Court.

168 The appellant argues for what has been called the “prima facie approach” following which a court seized of a referral application should refer the matter to arbitration upon being satisfied on aprima facie basis that the action was not commenced in breach of a valid arbitration agreement. The appellant, and the doctrine to which it refers, never gives a precise definition of the expression “prima facie” in this context. We interpret its submissions as meaning that the court seized of a referral application would have to decide if the arbitration agreement appears to be valid and applicable to the dispute only on the basis of the documents produced to support the motion, presuming that they are true, without hearing any testimonial evidence. The ruling of the court on the issue would not have the authority of a final judgment and the arbitral tribunal could conduct its own comprehensive review of the validity of the arbitration, subject to subsequent review by the courts.

169 On the contrary, the respondents argue for what has been called the “comprehensive approach” following which the objections to the validity of the arbitration agreement should be dealt with comprehensively before the matter is referred (or not) to arbitration. The court seized of a referral application could thus, for example, hear testimonial evidence before ruling on the validity of the arbitration agreement. Furthermore, its ruling would have the authority of a final judgment (res judicata) on the matter. As the intervener London Court of International Arbitration notes in its factum, the advocates of both approaches share a common objective, that is to promote the efficiency of the dispute resolution mechanisms. Where they disagree is on how best to achieve this objective.

170 The advocates of a comprehensive judicial review of the validity of the arbitration agreement under art. 940.1 C.C.P. rely on an “economy-of-means” rationale. They argue that it is a waste of time and money to refer the question of the validity of an agreement to an arbitral tribunal, whose very jurisdiction is challenged by one of the parties, in order to allow it to first rule on the question, as the parties will almost invariably have to return to the court either for a decision on the validity of the arbitration agreement pursuant to art. 943.1 C.C.P. (if the arbitral tribunal has declared itself competent) or to continue the proceedings that were interrupted by the referral application (if the arbitral tribunal has declared itself incompetent). They also argue that, as the jurisdiction of the arbitral tribunal depends entirely on the validity of the arbitration, it is illogical to ask the arbitral tribunal to first rule on the validity of the arbitration agreement.

171 Those who are in favour of limiting the review of the courts to a prima facie review focus on the prevention of dilatory tactics. They argue that a comprehensive review of the validity of an agreement, based on testimonial as well as documentary evidence, can take many months to decide, and that allowing such a review at the referral stage would afford a recalcitrant party the opportunity to delay unduly the commencement or progress of the arbitration. They further argue that the validity of the arbitration agreement should be presumed and that limiting its comprehensive review by the court only to the motions brought pursuant to art. 943.1 C.C.P. does not entail the same problems as this provision explicitly provides that the arbitral tribunal may pursue the proceedings and make its award while such a motion is pending.

172 It is particularly significant to note that art. 940.1 C.C.P. clearly provides that a preliminary question be answered by the court concerning the agreement’s validity; the provision does not specify that only a “prima facie” review be undertaken. The Quebec Superior Court, as a court designated by s. 96 of the Constitution Act, 1867, possesses inherent jurisdiction and has original jurisdiction in any matter unless jurisdiction is taken away by statute, according to arts. 31 and 33 C.C.P. (see also T. A. Cromwell in “Aspects of Constitutional Judicial Review in Canada” (1995), 46 S.C. L. Rev. 1027, at pp. 1030-31, cited to MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. v. Simpson, [1995] 4 S.C.R. 725, at para. 32). In matters involving an exclusive arbitration clause, the Quebec legislator has seen fit to divest Quebec courts of their jurisdiction pursuant to art. 3148, para. 2 C.C.Q., subject to those exceptions discussed above, and subject to art. 940.1 C.C.P. which, on its face, clearly gives the Superior Court the power to consider the validity of the arbitration agreement.

173 According to contextual argument based on the French version of art. 940.1 C.C.P., the word “constate” effectively means that courts can only undertake a prima facie review of the nullity of the arbitration agreement. But then art. 2642 C.C.Q. uses the same language with regard to the arbitrator’s review of the arbitration clause: “la constatation de la nullit√© du contrat par les arbitres ne rend pas nulle pour autant la convention d’arbitrage”. Applying the reasoning that “constate” in art. 940.1 C.C.P. signifies a prima facie review pursuant to art. 2642 C.C.Q., an arbitrator would be limited to aprima facie analysis of the validity of the contract containing the arbitration clause and would be unable to conduct any in depth analysis or hear proof as to the alleged nullity of a contract. Such a result would confirm that the argument is flawed and illogical. Moreover, the verb “constate”, in a legal context, does not appear to imply a superficial review. It may just as well indicate a review on the merits of an issue of fact and law. See G. Cornu, Vocabulaire juridique (8th ed. 2000), at p. 208.

174 Furthermore, the Minister of Justice’s comments on art. 2642 C.C.Q. support the proposition that a full review of nullity can be undertaken by the courts when the validity of the arbitration agreement is challenged. This article provides that an arbitration agreement contained in a contract is a separate agreement from the other clauses of the contract in which it is contained. As a consequence, the arbitration agreement must be subject to all of the general grounds for invalidating a contract at civil law, including those applying specifically to consumer or adhesion contracts. The comment of the Minister of Justice specifically recognizes that an arbitration agreement is subject to the general rules of contract and can be challenged before the courts on the same basis as any other contract:

[TRANSLATION] This rule [art. 2642 C.C.Q.] does not preclude a party from asking the court to rule on the nullity of the arbitration agreement if, for example, he or she did not give free and informed consent or did not have the capacity to contract. The general rules of the law of obligations apply to an arbitration agreement as to any contract.
(Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, vol. II, at p. 1651)

175 An argument was also presented on the basis of the UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration of June 21, 1985 (“Model Law”), U.N. Doc. A/40/17, Annex I, and theConvention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, 330 U.N.T.S. 3 (“New York Convention”), international documents the Quebec rules on arbitration are based on and which can be used to interpret the C.C.P. rules (see GreCon Dimter, at paras. 39-43, and art. 940.6 C.C.P.). It was argued that these provisions mandate that only a prima facie review of nullity be undertaken by courts. A review of these provisions has convinced us that the drafters of the Model Law and the New York Convention intended that courts and arbitrators have concurrent jurisdiction over such questions. In our view, the Quebec legislator, basing the Quebec rules on these international documents, adopted the same approach. The Report of the Working Group preparing the Model Law specifically states that it opted not to take a “manifestly” null and void approach:

77. A suggestion was made that [article 8 of the Model Law] should not be understood as requiring the court to examine in detail the validity of an arbitration agreement and that this idea could be expressed by requiring only a prima facie finding or by rephrasing the closing words as follows: “unless it finds that the agreement is manifestly null and void”. In support of that idea it was pointed out that it would correspond with the principle to let the arbitral tribunal make the first ruling on its competence, subject to later control by a court. However, the prevailing view was that, in the cases envisaged under paragraph (1) where the parties differed on the existence of a valid arbitration agreement, that issue should be settled by the court, without first referring the issue to an arbitral tribunal, which allegedly lacked jurisdiction. The Working Group, after deliberation, decided to retain the text of paragraph (1).
(Report of the Working Group on International Contract Practices on the work of its fifth session (New York, 22 February - 4 March 1983), A/CN.9/233)

The finding is confirmed by P. Binder in International Commercial Arbitration and Conciliation in UNCITRAL Model Law Jurisdictions (2nd ed. 2005), at p. 91.

176 Endorsing a concurrent jurisdiction approach to questions concerning the validity of the agreement is defendable on an “economy-of-means” rationale and consistent with the general policy favouring the autonomy of the parties. Although art. 940.1 C.C.P. is not clear regarding the extent of the analysis the court should undergo, we think that a discretionary approach favouring resort to the arbitrator in most instances would best serve the legislator’s clear intention to promote the arbitral process and its efficiency, while preserving the core supervisory jurisdiction of the Superior Court. When seized with a declinatory exception, a court should rule on the validity of the arbitration only if it is possible to do it on the basis of documents and pleadings filed by the parties without having to hear evidence or make findings about its relevance and reliability.

177 This approach appears to be more consistent with the legislative framework which favours an a posteriori control of the arbitral process and sentences. As we have noted above, the affirmative ruling of an arbitrator on jurisdiction will always be subject to the comprehensive review of a court seized of the question pursuant to art. 943.1 C.C.P. Furthermore, art. 946.4, para. 1(2) C.C.P. expressly provides, inter alia, that a court can refuse the homologation of an arbitration award on proof that the arbitration agreement that led to it was invalid. Both these means of exercising a posteriori control do not impede the efficiency of the arbitration proceeding since the latter takes place after the arbitral proceeding has been completed and the former does not suspend it.

178 That said, we believe courts may still exercise some discretion when faced with a challenge to the validity of an arbitration agreement regarding the extent of the review they choose to undertake. In some circumstances, particularly in those that truly merit the label “international commercial arbitration”, it may be more efficient to submit all questions regarding jurisdiction for the arbitrator to hear at first instance. In other circumstances, such as in the present case where we are faced with the need to interpret provisions of the Civil Code, it would seem preferable for the court to fully entertain the challenge to the arbitration agreement’s validity. In our view, the courts below were correct to fully consider Dumoulin’s challenge to the validity of the arbitration agreement based on the application of art. 3149 C.C.Q.

D. Possible Grounds of Nullity of the Arbitration Agreement

(1) Does the Arbitration Clause Constitute a Waiver of the International Jurisdiction of the Quebec Authorities that Cannot Be Set Up Against Dumoulin?

179 Here, we are faced with the task of interpreting art. 3149 C.C.Q. which is located in Section II, “Personal Actions of a Patrimonial Nature” included in Chapter II, “Special Provisions” of Title Three, “International Jurisdiction of Qu√©bec Authorities” in Book Ten of the Civil Code, entitled “Private International Law”. There are four provisions in Section II. First, there is art. 3148, para. 1(1) to (5) of which set out the general rules on when a Quebec authority has jurisdiction to hear a dispute. As discussed above, the second paragraph sets out when a Quebec authority loses jurisdiction to hear a dispute it would otherwise be competent to hear. Then arts. 3149 to 3151, as mentioned earlier, appear as legislated limits on the autonomy of the parties.

180 For ease of reference, we set out arts. 3148, para. 2 and 3149 C.C.Q.:

3148. In personal actions of a patrimonial nature, a Québec authority has jurisdiction where
. . .
However, a Québec authority has no jurisdiction where the parties, by agreement, have chosen to submit all existing or future disputes between themselves relating to a specified legal relationship to a foreign authority or to an arbitrator, unless the defendant submits to the jurisdiction of the Québec authority.

3149. A Québec authority also has jurisdiction to hear an action involving a consumer contract or a contract of employment if the consumer or worker has his domicile or residence in Québec; the waiver of such jurisdiction by the consumer or worker may not be set up against him.

181 The first phrase of art. 3149 confers jurisdiction on a “Qu√©bec authority” to hear an action involving a consumer or employment contract so long as the consumer or worker has his or her residence or domicile in Quebec. This phrase must be seen as giving additional protection to consumers and workers by conferring jurisdiction to Quebec authorities when these persons act as plaintiffs, since Quebec authorities already have jurisdiction where the consumer or worker is named as the defendant (per art. 3148, para. 1(1)).

182 The second phrase of art. 3149 provides that the waiver of the jurisdiction of Quebec authorities by the consumer or worker cannot be set up against him or her. A consumer or worker waives the jurisdiction of Quebec authorities precisely through entering the type of agreement contemplated in art. 3148, para. 2, whereby parties “. . . have chosen to submit all existing or future disputes between themselves . . . to a foreign authority or to an arbitrator”. The effect of the second phrase is that a defending party cannot, in response to an action brought before a Quebec authority, the Superior Court for example, argue that the court has no jurisdiction to hear the matter by operation of a forum selection or arbitration clause.

183 Here, Dumoulin has his domicile in Quebec and the Superior Court is clearly a Quebec authority. It would seem that, for Dell to maintain that the Superior Court has no jurisdiction in this matter, it would have to argue that the arbitrator presiding over the NAF arbitration proceeding is a Quebec authority. It is only if this is the case that Dumoulin cannot be said to have waived the jurisdiction of a Quebec authority through the arbitration clause.

184 Thus, in determining whether art. 3149 C.C.Q. applies, the language invites us to ask whether the jurisdiction chosen in the contract through a forum selection or arbitration clause is a “Qu√©bec authority”. If that jurisdiction is not a “Qu√©bec authority”, art. 3149 comes into play to permit the consumer or worker to bring his or her dispute before a “Qu√©bec authority”. The issue, then, is who is a “Qu√©bec authority”?

185 The respondents argue that art. 3149 must be read in light of the distinction made in the second paragraph of art. 3148 between a “Qu√©bec authority”, a “foreign authority” and “an arbitrator”, such that a “Qu√©bec authority” in art. 3149 cannot be a “foreign authority” or “an arbitrator”. This is challenged by the appellant who argues that if the arbitration is to take place in Quebec, then art. 3149 does not apply at all. The argument being made is that the arbitration is not “international” since it was found that it would take place in Quebec. In such a case, the rules of private international law in Book Ten of the C.C.Q. do not come into play. This submission raises a new question that has become a central issue in this case: faced with an exclusive arbitration clause agreed on by the parties, to what extent — if any — must the facts disclose “foreign” elements, or be “international” for the rules of private international law to be engaged? The question calls for a detailed examination.

(a) Must the Arbitration Agreement Contain a “Foreign Element” in Order for Articles 3148, Para. 2 and 3149 — Rules of Private International Law — to Be Engaged?

186 The introduction to any private international law (or “conflict of laws” as it is more commonly referred to in common law jurisdictions) textbook will state that this area of law comes into play in legal disputes involving foreign elements. But what does this general assertion mean? Is any foreign element sufficient to invoke private international law? In order to answer these questions, it is helpful to first explain the nature, purpose and structure of private international law.

187 Despite what its name might connote, and the existence of international agreements on various aspects of private international law, the latter is not international in the “public international law” sense. It is not “international” or universal norms that determine when such rules apply; rather, these are domestic laws created by the judiciary or the legislature within a given territory. J.-G. Castel, inCanadian Conflict of Laws (4th ed. 1997), at pp. 4-5, describes the character of the conflict of laws:

Principles and rules of the conflict of laws are not international, they are essentially national in character. Since they are part of the local law, they are formulated by the legislative bodies of the different legal units or are to be found in the decisions of their courts.

188 At their core, the rules of private international law/conflict of laws are local laws designed to provide answers in legal situations where two or more systems of law are capable of applying. Unfortunately, as discussed by Collier, at pp. 5-6, the names given to this area of law can be misleading with respect to its purpose:

Two names for the subject [“private international law” and “conflict of laws”] are in common use; however, they are interchangeable. Neither is wholly accurate or properly descriptive. The name “conflict of laws” is somewhat misleading, since the object of this branch of the law is to eliminate any conflict between two or more systems of law (including [domestic] law) which have competing claims to govern the issue which is before the court, rather than to provoke such a conflict, as the words may appear to suggest. However, it was the name given to the subject by A. V. Dicey, when he published his treatise, the first coherent account by an English lawyer of its rules and principles, in 1896 and it has been hallowed by use ever since.

Another name is “private international law”, which is in common use in Europe. This is even more misleading than “conflict of laws”, and each of its three words requires comment. “Private” distinguishes the subject from “public” international law, or international law simpliciter. The latter is the name for the body of rules and principles which governs states and international organisations in their mutual relations. It is administered through the International Court of Justice, other international courts and arbitral tribunals, international organisations and foreign offices, although, as part of a state’s municipal or domestic law, it is also applied by that state’s courts. Its sources are primarily to be found in international treaties, the practice of states in their relations (or custom) and the general principles of municipal legal systems. Private international law is concerned with the legal relations between private individuals and corporations, though also with the relations between states and governments so far as their relationships with other entities are governed by municipal law, an example being a government which contracts with individuals and corporations by raising a loan from them. Its sources are the same as those of any other branch of municipal law, which is to say that [domestic] private international law is derived from legislation and decisions of [domestic] courts.

“International” is used to indicate that the subject is concerned not only with the application by [domestic] courts of [domestic] law but of rules of foreign law also. The word is inapt, however, in so far as it might suggest that it is in some way concerned with the relations between states (it is even more inapt if it suggests “nations” rather than states). . . .

The word “law” must be understood in a special sense. The application of the rules of [a country’s or province’s] private international law does not by itself decide a case, as does that of the rules of the law of contract or tort. Private international law is not substantive law in this sense, for, as we have seen, it merely provides a body of rules which determine whether the [domestic] court has jurisdiction to hear and decide a case, and if it has, what system of law, [domestic] or foreign, will be employed to decide it, or whether a judgment of a foreign court will be recognised and enforced by [a domestic] court.

189 As this last paragraph suggests, the rules of private international law specifically involve the three following areas: (1) choice of law; (2) choice of jurisdiction; and (3) recognition of foreign judgments (see also Tetley, at p. 791).

190 “Choice of law” rules attempt to resolve the issue of which law governs a legal dispute when it becomes possible for the laws from more than one legal system to apply. A classic example would be a car accident occurring in Quebec, involving a resident of Ontario and a resident of Quebec. Rules developed to determine whether Ontario or Quebec substantive law should govern the dispute (i.e., the lex loci delicti rule adopted in Tolofson v. Jensen, [1994] 3 S.C.R. 1022, if Ontario authorities are seized of the question, and art. 3126 of Book Ten of the C.C.Q. if Quebec authorities are seized of the question) fall under the “choice of law” category of private international law.

191 “Choice of jurisdiction” rules attempt to resolve the issue of which jurisdiction can hear a dispute when it becomes possible for more than one jurisdiction to be seized of the matter. The issues raised by this area are logically considered prior to those raised under “choice of law”. Consider the example given above. Which choice of law rule will be applied is not the first question to be addressed. A court hearing the dispute must first decide whether it can properly exercise jurisdiction over the dispute. Could the Alberta courts hear the dispute between the Quebec and Ontario motorists? Would the Ontario courts be better situated to hear the dispute? These are the types of questions “choice of jurisdiction” rules help to determine.

192 “Recognition of foreign judgments” rules operate to do just what the name suggests: they provide guidance on when the domestic jurisdiction can recognize and give force of law to foreign judgments.

193 A word should be said about the general structure of traditional private international law rules. Within each of the three areas discussed, different factors are identified to help resolve the issue at hand. The relevant factors to be considered are called “connecting factors”. Connecting factors are defined by Tetley as facts which tend to connect a transaction or occurrence with a particular law or jurisdiction. These can be domicile, residence, nationality or place of incorporation of the parties; the place(s) of conclusion or performance of the contract; the place(s) where the tort or delict was committed or where its harm was felt; the flag or country of registry of the ship; the shipowner’s base of operation, etc. (see Tetley, at pp. 41 and 195-96). Since private international law rules are domestic rules, as discussed above, it is the domestic courts or the legislature that determine what the relevant connecting factors will be. As well, the relevant connecting factors can vary depending on the area of private law under scrutiny. For example, in “choice of law” the factors one looks to in order to determine which law should apply in a family dispute may be different from the factors one looks at to determine which laws apply in torts or contracts.

194 The general claim is that the rules of private international law are engaged once a legal dispute presents foreign elements. The above discussion should bring to light the obvious link between this assertion and the connecting factors that will be considered in applying private international law rules. The connecting factors are indicators of the legally relevant foreign elements that can bring private international law rules into operation; they include such factors as different domiciles, residency or nationality of the parties, jurisdiction where legal proceedings were brought as compared to where the tort occurred, or where the contract was concluded, etc. For example, the choice of law rule set out at art. 3094 C.C.Q. reads:

3094. The obligation of support is governed by the law of the domicile of the creditor. However, where the creditor cannot obtain support from the debtor under that law, the applicable law is that of the domicile of the debtor.

This rule implies that the relevant foreign element would be a difference in domicile between creditor and debtor of support obligations; a wife domiciled in Quebec and a husband domiciled in New Brunswick, for example. That the parties might have been married in a jurisdiction other than Quebec would be an irrelevant foreign element in applying this rule. Thus, not all foreign elements will be relevant. The relevant foreign elements will be those raised by the applicable private international law rule.

195 Must there always be a foreign element to engage the rules of private international law? Since these are domestic laws, it is certainly possible for legislators to craft private international rules that can be engaged absent foreign elements. It is not as if there were any constitutional or international laws prohibiting the legislator from adopting such rules. One example is found in art. 3111 C.C.Q., which acknowledges the capacity of parties to choose the rules that will govern their contractual relationship, whether they be domestic or foreign. The first paragraph of art. 3111 states:

3111. A juridical act, whether or not it contains any foreign element, is governed by the law expressly designated in the act or the designation of which may be inferred with certainty from the terms of the act.

The stated purpose of this particular rule of private international law, one that comes into operation absent any foreign element, is to respect the principle primacy of the autonomy of the parties:

[TRANSLATION] The principle of autonomy of the will of the parties is firmly rooted in Quebec’s legal traditions, and the proposed article confirms it.

. . . [T]he parties may choose the law applicable to their contract not only if the contract contains a foreign element, but also if it does not.

(Projet de loi 125: Code civil du Québec, Commentaires détaillés sur les dispositions du projet, Livre X: Du droit international privé et disposition finale (Art. 3053 à 3144) (1991). Titre deuxième: Des conflits de lois (Art. 3059 à 3110), Chapitre troisième: Du statut des obligations (Art. 3085 à 3108), at p. 53)

As discussed earlier, this principle had significant influence in the crafting of the new private international rules in Book Ten of the C.C.Q. See Talpis, at p. 189:

[T]he New Code adopts a very subjective approach to party autonomy. Going well beyond the Rome Convention on the Law Applicable to Contractual Relations of June 19, 1980 and the Swiss Code of Private International Law of December 18, 1987, from which many of the rules on contractual obligations were drawn, party autonomy under the new Code allows for an unrestricted choice of law, even in the absence of a foreign element (Paragraph 2 of Art. 3111), for the severance of the contract (Paragraph 3 of Art. 3111), extension to succession (Paragraph 2 of Art. 3098), to certain aspects of civil responsibility (Art. 3127), and even to the external relationships of conventional representation (Art. 3116). [Emphasis added.]

196 This brings us to art. 3148, para. 2 C.C.Q. which Talpis also argues allows for unrestricted choice (p. 218). It has been the subject of some debate whether, in order to claim the application of art. 3148, para. 2, a foreign element need be shown to exist. Aside from the presence of an exclusive forum selection clause, or an arbitration clause, no other factor is mentioned in the provision as being necessary for its operation.

197 Two theories have been offered on whether the application of art. 3148, para. 2 requires the presence of a foreign element. The first is that, like in the case of art. 3111 C.C.Q., the legislator intended that no foreign element be present for its operation; this would be consistent with the desire to give primacy to the autonomy of the parties. See S. Rochette, “Commentaire sur la d√©cision United European Bank and Trust Nassau Ltd. c. Duchesneau — Le tribunal qu√©b√©cois doit-il examiner le caract√®re abusif d’une clause d’√©lection de for incluse dans un contrat d’adh√©sion?”, in Rep√®res, EYB 2006REP504, September 2006, who, writing on the subject of forum selection clauses, states: [TRANSLATION] “[A]rticles 3111 and 3148, para. 2 C.C.Q. in no way require that a contract contain a foreign element for effect to be given to a forum selection clause in favour of a foreign authority.”

198 This would also be consistent with a global trend occurring within the area of private international law with which we are dealing — choice of jurisdiction. In modern times, when it is recognized that respecting parties’ jurisdiction clauses promotes commercial certainty, it is generally accepted that the rules and principles which confer jurisdiction in private international law fall within at least two categories: (i) consensual jurisdiction; and (ii) “connected” jurisdiction (some authors also point to a potential third area of jurisdiction, “exclusive jurisdiction”, on which it is not necessary to elaborate here): see J. Hill “The Exercise of Jurisdiction in Private International Law”, in Asserting Jurisdiction: International and European Legal Perspectives (2003), at p. 39; S. Guillemard and A. Prujiner in “La codification internationale du droit international priv√©: un √©chec?” (2005), 46 C. de D. 175; and G. Saumier. Consensual jurisdiction rules are those permitting the parties to determine by agreement the jurisdiction to govern their dispute. Hill, at p. 49, describes it as follows:

According to the submission principle, a court is competent — notwithstanding the fact that neither the events giving rise to the dispute nor the parties have any connection with the forum — if parties voluntarily submit to the court’s jurisdiction. Such a submission may take the form of a voluntary appearance to defend the claim without challenging the court’s jurisdiction or a contractual agreement, typically a jurisdiction clause forming part of a wider agreement. [Emphasis added.]

Under the second category, the “connected” jurisdiction rules employ connecting factors to assist in determining whether the jurisdiction seized can hear the matter. Thus, only the second category of jurisdiction is concerned with an examination of factual links to geographical territories.

199 On the other hand, it has been pointed out that unlike art. 3111, which specifically stipulates that the provision applies even in the absence of a “foreign element”, art. 3148, para. 2 makes no such concession and that this silence should not be construed as a mere oversight. See S. Guillemard, “Libert√© contractuelle et rattachement juridictionnel: le droit qu√©b√©cois face aux droits fran√ßais et europ√©en”, E.J.C.L., vol. 8.2, June 2004, at pp. 25-26, online:

[TRANSLATION] Must a case be intrinsically international for the designation of a foreign court or tribunal to be permissible, or can the designation of a foreign authority constitute in itself the foreign element required to make a dispute an international one? . . .

The Civil Code of Qu√©bec does not expressly indicate how this question should be answered, but merely allows the parties to agree to a forum “[with respect] to a specified legal relationship”. This statement merits special attention, since Quebec’s codifiers were more specific where the normative connection is concerned. Under article 3111 C.C.Q., the parties may designate the law applicable to “[a] juridical act, whether or not it contains any foreign element”. How should the silence of the provisions on the jurisdiction of courts be interpreted? Pierre-Andr√© C√īt√©, a Quebec expert on statutory interpretation, gives the following warning: “Assuming a statute to be well drafted, an interpretation which adds to the terms . . . is suspect”. He cites the recommendation of Lord Mersey: “It is a strong thing to read into an Act of Parliament words which are not there, and in the absence of clear necessity it is a wrong thing to do”. In other words, if, as the saying goes, the legislature “does not speak gratuitously”, it certainly does not remain silent for no reason either. Since a comparison of the two provisions — on choice of law and on choice of forum — is perplexing because of the precision of one and the silence of the other, it must be concluded that selecting a forum is permitted in Quebec law only in a case with a foreign element. [Footnotes omitted.]

The author goes on to theorize, however, that the forum selection clause in itself may be the requisite foreign element since any other conclusion would fail to respect the principle of the primacy of the autonomy of the parties:

[TRANSLATION] Is it possible that the designation by the parties of a court of a state with no other connection whatsoever to the contract would not in itself constitute a sufficiently significant connection?
(. . .)
In our opinion, to require that one of the elements of the case be “objectively” foreign would be inconsistent with the principle of freedom of contract. This would amount to viewing the jurisdictional connection solely within the framework — if not the straitjacket — of the elements of the contract itself, as is the case with other connecting factors in this area. Moreover, this reasoning is illogical. As we have seen, there is generally no requirement of a connection between the court and a contract otherwise characterized as an international one. [pp. 26 and 28]

Guillemard similarly recognizes that the same conclusion can be reached in the case of arbitration clauses:

[TRANSLATION] [W]e have observed that where the choice of forum is concerned, in Quebec law at least, the “artificial” internationality that results uniquely from the fact that the authority belongs to another legal system does not appear necessarily to be precluded. It would seem to us to be illogical if the same were not true in the arbitration sphere. [p. 50]

200 In our view, the proposition that forum selection and arbitration clauses constitute on their own the requisite foreign element such that their presence alone brings art. 3148, para. 2 into operation seems quite logical. In the case of forum selection clauses, the effect of such clauses will be to divest Quebec authorities of their jurisdiction to hear the matter in order for the dispute to be sent to another country or province to be heard under the laws of that jurisdiction. Similarly, the effect of exclusive arbitration clauses is to create a “private jurisdiction” that implicates the loss of jurisdiction of state-appointed authorities for dispute resolution, such as domestic courts and administrative tribunals.

201 We see no principled basis to distinguish between forum selection and arbitration clauses with regard to the question of whether they represent in and of themselves a foreign element. The fact that contractual arbitration may take place within the geographic territory of Quebec is not determinative of anything in that respect. First and foremost, the effect of both is to derogate from the jurisdiction of Quebec authorities and vest jurisdiction in some other entity. It seems to us that the rules in Title Three of Book Ten of the C.C.Q. are concerned with “jurisdiction” with respect to judicial and quasi-judicial powers, not so much “jurisdiction” in the geographical sense (though the notions can obviously overlap). Jurisdiction can mean a number of things, depending on the context. In Lipohar v. The Queen (1999), 200 C.L.R. 485, [1999] HCA 65, at p. 516, it was said of “jurisdiction”: “It is used in a variety of senses, some relating to geography, some to persons and procedures, others to constitutional and judicial structures and powers.”

202 The fact that Title Three is entitled “International Jurisdiction of Quebec Authorities” does not, in our view, mandate another conclusion. We do not take the reference to “international jurisdiction” to necessarily connote that questions of jurisdiction arise only when faced with geographical extra-territoriality. Private arbitration proceedings, even those located in Quebec, are just as removed from Quebec’s judicial and quasi-judicial systems — and hence “international” — as legal proceedings taking place in another province or country. One should avoid placing undue emphasis on the reference to “international” in Title Three for the same reasons discussed earlier concerning how one should not be mislead by the reference to “international” in the expression “private international law”. Indeed, earlier draft versions of Title Three used the title “Conflicts of Jurisdiction” (see J. A. Talpis and G. Goldstein, “Analyse critique de l’avant-projet de loi du Qu√©bec en droit international priv√©” (1988), 91 R. du N. 606, at p. 608). As well, “International Jurisdiction of Quebec Authorities” may be somewhat of a misnomer since Quebec authorities must exercise their adjudicative jurisdiction within the territorial limits of the province — hence the holding in Morguard Properties Ltd. v. City of Winnipeg, [1983] 2 S.C.R. 493, that to be constitutional, assertions of jurisdiction over a legal dispute must have a real and substantial connection to the province.

203 As a final point, it should be noted that unlike many of the other provinces, Quebec has adopted arbitration rules that make no distinction between domestic and international arbitration. The Book on Arbitration in the C.C.P. covers both “domestic” and “international” arbitration; the rules are essentially identical. The purpose of this approach was to show deference to the parties’ choice to arbitrate. In the common law provinces, some distinctions are made between “domestic” and “international” arbitrations for the purposes of court intervention and recognition of arbitral awards. The trend appears to be that court intervention is more tightly constrained in “international” arbitration than “domestic” arbitration. Courts are given more freedom to intervene and hear domestic arbitrations. (It would be an odd thing indeed if, in the face of this trend, this Court were to interpret Quebec law to permit greater court intervention in “international” arbitration only.) If Quebec does not make the distinction in the C.C.P. rules, it stands to reason that one should not distinguish for the purpose of Book Ten of the C.C.Q. This is especially so when it seems that the only reason the word “arbitrator” was included in art. 3148, para. 2 (which substantially duplicates the effects of art. 940.1 C.C.P.) was to make available the exceptions to art. 3148, para. 2 at arts. 3149 to 3151.

204 For these reasons, we would conclude that an arbitration clause is itself sufficient to trigger the application of art. 3148, para. 2, and hence the exceptions that apply to it, including art. 3149.

(b) The Quebec Court of Appeal’s Decision in Dominion Bridge

205 The appellant has relied on the decision in Dominion Bridge, in support of its position. There, the Court of Appeal, in obiter, interpreted art. 3149 such that it would permit workers or consumers to be bound to arbitration through an exclusive arbitration clause, so long as the arbitration occurs inside Quebec. Quebec courts have since followed this precedent, including Lemelin J. for the Court of Appeal below, although its wisdom has been questioned: see G. Goldstein and E. Groffier, Droit international privé (2003), t. II, Règles spécifiques, at p. 640.

206 It is clear that the decision in Dominion Bridge, was based on a mistaken belief that the intent of the legislator in enacting art. 3149 was to protect consumers and workers from moving their disputes outside Quebec. Explaining the basis of his conclusion, Beauregard J.A. speculates: [TRANSLATION] “The legislature’s main intention was probably to protect a worker’s right to sue his or her employer in Quebec” (p. 324). In fact, an examination of the comments made by the Minister of Justice when enacting this legislation reveals that the intent was to preserve consumer and worker access to Quebec courts and other state-appointed dispute resolution forums, not merely to keep them within the geographic territory of Quebec. The comments of the Minister of Justice on art. 3149 are as follows:

[TRANSLATION] This article is new law and is based on Switzerland’s 1987 Loi f√©d√©rale sur le droit international priv√© and on the third paragraph of article 85 C.C.L.C. It confers jurisdiction over a consumer contract or a contract of employment on a Quebec authority where the consumer or worker is resident or domiciled in Quebec; this jurisdiction is in addition to the jurisdiction based on the criteria set out in article 3148.

The article provides consumers and workers with enhanced protection.
(Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, vol. II, at pp. 2010-11)

207 It is instructive to examine the provisions that art. 3149 is purportedly modelled upon. First, there is art. 85 C.C.L.C. which provides:

85. When the parties to a deed have for the purpose of such deed, made election of domicile in any other place than their real domicile, all notifications, demands and suits relating thereto may be made at the elected domicile, and before the judge of such domicile.
(. . .)
Save in the case of a notarial deed, an election of domicile shall be without effect as regards the jurisdiction of any court, when it is signed by a non-trader within the boundaries of the district in which he resides.

208 Then, there is s. 114 of the Swiss legislation on private international law (Loi fédérale sur le droit international privé (December 18, 1987), RO 1988 1776), which provides:

[TRANSLATION]

Art. 114 Contracts with consumers

1. Where a consumer brings an action relating to a contract that satisfies the conditions set out in art. 120, para. 1, he may elect to do so in the Swiss court:

a. of his domicile or of his habitual place of residence, or

b. of the supplier’s domicile or, in the absence of such domicile, of the supplier’s habitual place of residence.

2. A consumer may not waive in advance the forum of his domicile or habitual place of residence.

209 Both provisions specifically maintain the jurisdiction of the courts to hear consumer disputes. As well, it should be noted the Minister of Justice’s comments on arts. 3117 and 3118, which are rules that also seek to protect the consumer and worker when it comes to choice of law, end with the following statements, respectively:

[TRANSLATION] It should be noted that the consumer contract is defined in article 1384 and that article 3149 confers jurisdiction on the Quebec courts in certain circumstances where consumer contracts are in issue.
(. . .)
It should also be noted here that article 3149 confers jurisdiction on the Quebec courts in certain circumstances where contracts of employment are in issue. [Emphasis added.]
(Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, vol. II, at pp. 1987-88)

210 There appears from the above to be an intention on the part of the Quebec legislator to safeguard consumer and worker access to the courts. It is interesting to note that in a more recent decision, Rees v. Convergia, [2005] Q.J. No. 3248 (QL), 2005 QCCA 353, the Court of Appeal seems to recognize that this was the purpose of art. 3149 C.C.Q.: [TRANSLATION] “Evidently, the legislature intended, in adopting article 3149 C.C.Q., to confer a separate and full jurisdiction on the Quebec courts in two areas of economic activity where one of the contracting parties is particularly vulnerable” (para. 37 (emphasis added)).

211 A further problem with the interpretation of art. 3149 in Dominion Bridge is that it essentially equates a contractual arbitrator seated in Quebec with a “Qu√©bec authority”. Applying this notion in most situations demonstrates the flaws in this approach. Assuming that being a decision-maker situated in Quebec is sufficient to make one a “Qu√©bec authority”, it ignores the issue of whether the arbitrator must be from Qu√©bec. In this case, as we read the provisions on appointment of arbitrators in NAF’s Code, Rules 20 24, there is no guarantee that an arbitrator will be from the complainant’s jurisdiction. If the parties do not select an arbitrator on mutually agreeable terms, NAF chooses, permitting the parties to strike out one candidate each from the short list. The only provision that touches on what jurisdiction the arbitrator may be from is Rule 21E. It reads as follows:

E. Unless the Parties agree otherwise, in cases involving citizens of different countries, the Forum may designate an Arbitrator or Arbitrator candidate based, in part, on the nationality and residence of the Arbitrator or Arbitrator candidate, but may not exclude an Arbitrator solely because the person is a citizen of the same country of a Party.

It is nothing short of puzzling how an arbitrator not from Quebec, even though located in Quebec, could be a “Qu√©bec authority”.

212 This approach also ignores another important issue: where does the arbitrator hold his authority from? Here, the arbitrator and arbitration proceedings under NAF are ultimately subject to U.S. law. We note that in this respect Rule 5O of NAF’s Code stipulates that “Arbitrations under the Code are governed by the Federal Arbitration Act in accord with Rule 48B.” Rule 48B stipulates that: “Unless the Parties agree otherwise, any Arbitration Agreement as described in Rules 1 and 2E and all arbitration proceedings, Hearings, Awards, and Orders are to be governed by the Federal Arbitration Act, 9 U.S.C. §§ 1 16.” No arbitrator who is bound by U.S. law could be a “Qu√©bec authority”. The respondents also rightly raise the fact that Rule 11D provides that all arbitrations will be in English. One would think a “Qu√©bec authority” would be required to provide arbitration services in French. Finally, it seems completely incongruous how, in this case, in order to begin the process attributing to the purported “Qu√©bec authority” power to hear the dispute, the consumer must first contact an American institution, located in Minneapolis, who is in charge of organizing the arbitration.

213 It should be noted, as well, that assigning the status of “Qu√©bec authority” to a contractual arbitrator seated in Quebec would have unwanted consequences when applied to the other exceptions to art. 3148, para. 2, especially art. 3151. It surely could not have been intended that in reserving jurisdiction to “Qu√©bec authorities” to hear all “matters of civil liability for damage suffered in or outside Qu√©bec as a result of exposure to or the use of raw materials”, that private arbitrators could be selected by the parties to hear such disputes before they arise. This is evident from the earlier version of this provision, art. 21.1 C.C.P., assented to June 21, 1989, which reserves the exclusive jurisdiction to hear disputes over raw materials to Quebec courts:

Civil Code of Lower Canada

8.1 The application of the rules of this Code is imperative in matters of liability for damage suffered in or outside Québec as a result of exposure to or use of raw materials, whether processed or not, originating in Québec.

Code of Civil Procedure

21.1 The courts of Québec have exclusive jurisdiction to hear in first instance all demands or actions founded on liability under article 8.1 of the Civil Code of Lower Canada.

In presenting these provisions, the Minister of Justice made the following declarations:

[TRANSLATION] Mr. Speaker, the purpose of the bill is to ensure that Quebec legal rules applicable to certain matters are also mandatory for foreigners.
(. . . )
Since the damage in question is suffered as a result of the use of or exposure to raw materials originating in Quebec, it seemed important that all litigants, be they Quebecers, other Canadians or foreigners, be treated equally and that a single legal scheme governing liability, namely that of Quebec . . . should apply to all of them.
(Quebec, National Assembly, Journal des débats, vol. 30, No. 134, 2nd Sess., 33rd Leg., June 21, 1989, at pp. 6941 and 6970)

It is clear that in introducing these provisions, the National Assembly wanted all litigants in this area to be subject to one single legal system — Quebec’s — which of course includes Quebec courts.

(c) Conclusion on the Interpretation of Art. 3149

214 As identified at the outset of this section, the application of art. 3149 hinges on the question “Who is a Quebec authority?” and, in our view, on this question only. It is obvious from the above discussion that a “Qu√©bec authority” must mean a decision-maker situated in Quebec holding its authority from Quebec law. This is consistent with the meaning of “Qu√©bec authority” discussed in Quebec doctrine. C. Emanuelli, in Droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois (2nd ed. 2006), defines the terms as encompassing: [TRANSLATION] “Quebec courts and notaries and other Quebec authorities, such as the Director of Youth Protection and the Registrar of Civil Status” (p. 70). H. P. Glenn notes that [TRANSLATION] “[b]y simply referring to ‘Qu√©bec authorities’ without further clarification, Title Three establishes the rules respecting the international jurisdiction of Quebec judicial and administrative authorities” (“Droit international priv√©”, in La R√©forme du Code civil (1993), vol. 3, 669, at p. 743 (emphasis added)). See also G. Goldstein and E. Groffier, who state: [TRANSLATION] “The new Code refers to Quebec or foreign ‘authorities’ rather than to courts. The intention is to include administrative authorities whose decisions may concern private law matters . . . . However, (non-state) arbitral tribunals do not appear to be regarded as ‘authorities’ for purposes of this Code” (Droit international priv√©, t. I, Th√©orie g√©n√©rale, at p. 287). This is completely consistent with the distinction made between “Qu√©bec authorities”, “foreign authorities” and “arbitrators” in art. 3148, para. 2.

215 While little has been written on the interpretation of art. 3149 itself, there is academic support for our position. In “Commentaire sur la d√©cision Dell Computer Corporation c. Union des consommateurs — Quand ‘browsewrap’ rime avec ‘arbitrabilit√©’” in Rep√®res, EYB 2005REP375, August 2005, N. W. Vermeys argues:

[TRANSLATION] Article 3148 C.C.Q. seems to preclude compulsory arbitration where consumer contracts are concerned. . . . The effect of this article is that the “arbitrator” concept is expressly excluded from that of the “Quebec authority”. Since the Code prevents a consumer from waiving the jurisdiction of Quebec authorities, it would necessarily be impossible to set up an arbitration clause against the consumer.

Vermeys further rejects the argument that an arbitrator could fit within the word “court” in the C.P.A., s. 271, para. 3, in order to qualify as a “Qu√©bec authority” for the purposes of arts. 3148 and 3149:

[TRANSLATION] For this purpose, some may be tempted to argue that the definition of “court” in the CPA includes an arbitrator. However, to interpret the word “courts” this broadly would appear to me to be inconsistent with the current state of the law. As the Court [of Appeal] quite correctly stated, “the [Consumer Protection] Act does not define this term, so it is necessary to turn to article 4 C.C.P.: ‘court’ means one of the courts of justice enumerated in article 22 or a judge presiding in a courtroom.” (Para. 51 of the decision in question). . . . [B]efore even consulting the Code of Civil Procedure, it should be determined whether the legislation is internally consistent. Several provisions of the Act, including sections 142, 143, 267 and 271, seem to imply that only courts within the meaning of the Code of Civil Procedure were contemplated by the legislature in drafting the CPA. [Footnote No. 20]

216 All of this leads to the conclusion that a contractual arbitrator cannot be a “Qu√©bec authority” for the purposes of art. 3149. Therefore, Dell cannot succeed here in trying to set up the exclusive arbitration against Dumoulin. This interpretation does not affect labour arbitrators, nor other forms of arbitration made available under Quebec statutes, because such arbitrators would qualify as “Qu√©bec authorities”: see Tremblay, at p. 252: [TRANSLATION] “A distinction must also be made between civil or commercial arbitration and other types of arbitration, such as grievance arbitration in labour law. In grievance arbitration, even though the parties can choose the third party, arbitration is compulsory by law” (emphasis added). This explains why this Court’s decisions in Bisaillon, and Desputeaux do not dictate our conclusion here. The former involved an arbitrator whose authority stemmed from Quebec’s Labour Code, and the latter involved an arbitrator designated by s. 37 of the Act respecting the professional status of artists in the visual arts, arts and crafts and literature, and their contracts with promoters. Nor does our interpretation signify that arbitration clauses in consumer and worker contracts are always invalid. It simply means that the agreement to arbitrate in advance of the dispute, which is the effect of an arbitration clause included in a contract of adhesion, could not be set up against the consumer or worker. The consumer or worker could well decide they want to arbitrate; in that case recourse to art. 3149 is unnecessary. This is explained very well by Goldstein and Groffier:

[TRANSLATION] All that article 3149 C.C.Q. says is that the party contracting with the weaker party cannot impose such a clause on him or her regardless of what the weaker party intended and perhaps even though . . . the weaker party originally opted for arbitration but subsequently changed his or her mind. While it is true that workers or consumers cannot waive the forum of their residence or domicile in advance, they can nevertheless waive it if they believe that would be in their interest in the circumstances. To say the contrary would be tantamount to saying that in international situations, nothing relating to a contract of employment or a consumer contract is arbitrable. [Emphasis in original.]

(Droit international privé, t. II, at p. 640)

217 Our conclusion on art. 3149 C.C.Q. is alone sufficient to dismiss the appellant’s motion to refer the dispute to arbitration and it is therefore not strictly necessary to study the other possible grounds of nullity of the arbitration agreement. That said, we are of the view that the other questions raised by this appeal are sufficiently important to make it necessary for our Court to state its views on their respective merits.

(2) Is the Arbitration Agreement Null Because a Consumer Dispute Is a Matter of Public Order?

218 Although the respondents did not specifically argue that a consumer dispute could never be arbitrated because it would constitute an arbitration over a matter of public order, we need to briefly state our position on the subject, as the question was discussed by the Court of Appeal. In our view, the Court of Appeal was correct in concluding that a consumer dispute can be arbitrated. Such a conclusion inevitably flows from the application of the reasoning we have adopted in Desputeaux, and is in accordance with the requirements of public policy, subject to the effect of art. 3149 C.C.Q.

219 Article 2639 C.C.Q. deals with the kind of disputes that cannot be submitted to arbitration. These are the “[d]isputes over the status and capacity of persons, family matters or other matters of public order”. The question is therefore whether a consumer dispute constitutes such another matter of public order. We believe that it does not. As we held in Desputeaux, the concept of public order in art. 2639, para. 1 C.C.Q. must be interpreted restrictively so as to respect the parties’ autonomy to choose arbitration, as well as the clear legislative intention to respect such a choice. As there was no compelling reason to consider copyright disputes as analogous to disputes regarding the status and capacity of persons or family matters in Desputeaux, there is no such compelling reason regarding consumer disputes in the case at bar.

220 Furthermore, the fact that certain C.P.A. rules to be applied by the arbitrator are in the nature of public order does not constitute a bar for the hearing of the case by an arbitral tribunal. The second paragraph of art. 2639 C.C.Q. makes this clear. This was also recognized by our Court in Desputeaux:

A broad interpretation of the concept of public order in art. 2639, para. 1 C.C.Q. has been expressly rejected by the legislature, which has specified that the fact that the rules applied by an arbitrator are in the nature of rules of public order is not a ground for opposing an arbitration agreement (art. 2639, para. 2 C.C.Q.). The purpose of enacting art. 2639, para. 2 C.C.Q. was clearly to put an end to an earlier tendency by the courts to exclude any matter relating to public order from arbitral jurisdiction. (See Condominiums Mont St Sauveur inc. v. Constructions Serge Sauvé ltée, [1990] R.J.Q. 2783, at p. 2789, in which the Quebec Court of Appeal in fact stated its disagreement with the earlier decision in Procon (Great Britain) Ltd. v. Golden Eagle Co., [1976] C.A. 565; see also Mousseau [v. Société de gestion Paquin ltée, [1994] R.J.Q. 2004 (Sup. Ct.)], at p. 2009.) Except in certain fundamental matters, relating, for example, strictly to the status of persons, as was found by the Quebec Superior Court to be the case in Mousseau,supra, an arbitrator may dispose of questions relating to rules of public order, since they may be the subject matter of the arbitration agreement. The arbitrator is not compelled to stay his or her proceedings the moment a matter that might be characterized as a rule or principle of public order arises in the course of the arbitration. [para. 53]

221 Finally, the fact that the C.P.A. and the C.C.Q. are silent as to the arbitrability of a consumer dispute suggests its permissibility. An act should only be interpreted as excluding the possibility of arbitration if it is clear from it that the legislator purported to exclude the possibility of arbitration. No provisions of the C.P.A. or the C.C.Q. lead us to think that it is the case for consumer disputes. More specifically, we think the Court of Appeal was correct in finding that art. 271, para. 3 C.P.A. merely defines the jurisdiction ratione materiae of the courts and in concluding that, as we held in Desputeaux, such an article should not be interpreted as excluding the possibility of arbitration.

222 The Quebec legislature has never given any clear indications that consumer disputes are not arbitrable. No general rule to that effect can be found anywhere. The legislature adopted another approach. The C.C.Q. and the C.P.A. contain certain rules which govern the validity, applicability and enforceability of arbitration agreements in respect of consumers.

223 The respondents seem to argue that a consumer dispute can never be arbitrated because arbitration proceedings should be considered inherently unfair for the consumer. We are not convinced that this is the case. On the contrary, we think that under certain circumstances, arbitration may actually be an appropriate or preferable forum for the adjudication of consumer disputes.

(3) Is the Arbitration Agreement Void Because It Constitutes a Waiver of the Jurisdiction of the Superior Court Over Class Actions Contrary to Public Order?

224 The respondents also argue that access to class actions is a matter of public order and therefore cannot be subject to arbitration under art. 2639. This argument must fail, because, as discussed above, art. 2639, para. 1 seeks to insulate only certain types of “matters” or disputes of public order from arbitration. Access to class actions is a procedural right and not a type of “matter” or dispute analogous to status and capacity of persons, or family law disputes.

225 The respondents alternatively argue that this Court should apply its decision in Garcia Transport Ltée v. Royal Trust Co., [1992] 2 S.C.R. 499, to find that the rules on class actions are rules of public order, with the consequence that contractual provisions preventing the consumer from accessing class actions are of no effect. In Garcia Transport, the Court concluded that a provision in the C.C.L.C. was a rule of public order absent an explicit statement within the provision indicating this status. Finding that such status could be implied, the Court identified a number of factors that indicated legislative intent to accord the provision this status. The decision leaves no doubt, however, that it is the Quebec legislature that decides which laws apply as a matter of public order, not the courts. The role of courts in this regard is to determine whether sufficient legislative intent is present to clearly indicate that a law is intended to be one of public order, and this will occur only in those rare cases where the legislator has been less than explicit about its status. The following excerpt from J.-L. Baudouin, Les obligations (3rd ed. 1989), at p. 81 (cited in Garcia Transport, at p. 525), accurately sets out the law:

[TRANSLATION] Most of the time, the legislature intervenes directly to establish what is a matter of public order. Sometimes there is even an explicit statement in the statutory or regulatory provision that it is of public order; sometimes it indicates that there can be no contractual derogation from the rule, and that any such derogation will be null. Sometimes, on the contrary, the legislature clearly indicates that it is left to the parties themselves to settle the question and that the rule that is set out will apply only to supplement their agreement. . . . In other cases, finally, the formula used does not directly suggest that the statute is truly imperative. It is then for the courts to determine the legislative intention and to decide whether the provisions should be treated as being of public order, that is, to determine whether they are imperative provisions or merely supplement the will of the parties. [Emphasis in original.]

226 In this case, there is no indication of a legislative intent to give the rules in Book IX on “Class Action” of the C.C.P. public order status. While art. 1051 C.C.P. states that the provisions of the other books of the C.C.P. that are inconsistent with the rules of Book IX do not apply, this rule merely intends to remedy practical difficulties in applying procedures that would be unfeasible in the class action context, such as strictly applying the rules on cross-claims and joinder. It does not elevate the right to institute class actions to the status of a rule of public order that cannot be waived. Furthermore, this Court’s recent decision in Bisaillon, is clear authority that the class action, while having an important social dimension, is only a “procedural vehicle whose use neither modifies nor creates substantive rights” and can generally be waived (para. 17). It is the legislature, and not the courts, that can create exceptions to this.

(4) Is the Arbitration Agreement Null Because Dumoulin Did Not Consent to It as It Was Imposed on Him Through a Contract of Adhesion?

227 The respondents also argue that the principle of the autonomy of the parties has no bearing on this case as the arbitration clause is found in a contract of adhesion. In other words, the respondents seem to argue that Dumoulin should not be bound by the arbitration agreement because he did not give a true consent to the contract in which it is contained, this contract being of adhesion. This argument must also fail. It is based on the false assumption that an adhering party does not truly consent to be bound by the obligations contained in a contract of adhesion. The notion of a contract of adhesion is only meant to describe the contract in which the essential stipulations were imposed or drawn up by one of the parties and were not negotiable (see art. 1379 C.C.Q.). This does not mean that the adhering party cannot give a true consent to it and be bound by each one of its clauses, subject to the possibility that some might be void or without effect pursuant to some other provisions of the law. As stated by J.-L. Baudouin and P.-G. Jobin:

[TRANSLATION] Since the adhering party’s only choice is between entering into the contract on the terms imposed by the other party and not entering into it, the question that arises is whether this is a true contract, that is, an agreement of the wills of the parties. Some authors argue that a contract of adhesion is more akin to a unilateral juridical act, whereas a contract is a bilateral juridical act. However, most authors consider a contract of adhesion to be a true contract even though the role of the will of the adhering party is reduced to a minimum. Support for this position can be found in the variety of mechanisms that have been developed at law to correct the inequities and problems of consent that result from the adhering party’s inability to negotiate . . . . [Emphasis in original.]

(Baudouin et Jobin: Les obligations (6th ed. 2005), at p. 79)

228 We agree with the position defended by the majority of the doctrine and think it is therefore not sufficient for the respondents to raise the fact that the arbitration clause is found in a contract of adhesion in order to demonstrate that Dumoulin should not be bound by it. Reliance on some other provisions of the law is necessary.

(5) Is the Arbitration Clause Void Because It Is Abusive?

229 Article 1437 C.C.Q. and s. 8 C.P.A. provide the basis for a judicial declaration of the nullity of an abusive clause. However, as was noted above, we are of the view that an arbitration clause cannot be said to be abusive only because it is found in a consumer contract or in a contract of adhesion. The agreement to arbitrate a consumer dispute is not inherently unfair and abusive for the consumer. On the contrary, it may well facilitate the consumer’s access to justice. Therefore, the consumer that raises this ground of nullity must prove that, given the particular facts of his case, the arbitration agreement should be considered abusive. Most of the time, such proof will require testimonial evidence. If that is the case, the question will have to be dealt with by the arbitral tribunal, subject to the possibility for the consumer to ask for a revision of the arbitral tribunal’s decision under art. 943.1 C.C.P. Such would have been the situation in the case at bar if it had not been for our conclusion regarding the applicability of art. 3149 C.C.Q.

(6) Is the Arbitration Agreement Null Because It Is an External Clause that Was Not Expressly Brought to the Attention of Dumoulin?

230 Generally, the question of whether the arbitration agreement is null pursuant to art. 1435, para. 2 C.C.Q. will be more appropriately left to the arbitral tribunal to decide. Although it will often be possible for a court to decide on examination of the material supporting the referral application if the arbitration agreement was contained in an external clause, it will generally not be possible to determine, on such a review, if this external clause was expressly brought to the attention of the consumer or adhering party, or if the consumer or adhering party otherwise knew of it. For that reason, a review involving testimonial evidence will often be necessary and this review is better left to the arbitral tribunal. Such would have been the situation in the case at bar if it had not been for our conclusion regarding the applicability of art. 3149 C.C.Q. in fine.

231 That said, the finding of the Court of Appeal that the arbitration clause was external because the Terms and Conditions were external is significant, given the growing frequency with which on-line contracts are made and the impact such a finding could have on e-commerce. As the position adopted by the Court of Appeal is not free from doubts, we feel compelled to state our view on the matter.

232 The context of e-commerce requires courts to be sensitive to a number of considerations. First, we are dealing with a different means of doing business than has heretofore been generally considered by the courts, with terminology and concepts that may not easily, though nevertheless must be fit within the existing body of contract law. Second, as e-commerce increasingly gains a greater foothold within our society, courts must be mindful of advancing the goal of commercial certainty (see Rudder v. Microsoft Corp. (1999), 2 C.P.R. (4th) 474 (Ont. S.C.J.)). Finally, the context demands that a certain level of computer competence be attributed to those who choose to engage in e-commerce. As noted by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Kanitz v. Rogers Cable Inc. (2002), 58 O.R. (3d) 299:

We are here dealing with people who wish to avail themselves of an electronic environment and the electronic services that are available through it. It does not seem unreasonable for persons who are seeking electronic access to all manner of goods, services and products, along with information, communication, entertainment and other resources, to have the legal attributes of their relationship with the very entity that is providing such electronic access, defined and communicated to them through that electronic format. [para. 32]

233 As a preliminary matter, the appellant raised the objection that the Court of Appeal made its own factual findings by reviewing the transcripts and appeal record in order to find that art. 1435 C.C.Q. applied. The appellant submits that the Court of Appeal erred by not remitting the case to the court below for the necessary evidentiary findings to be made since the Superior Court made no finding of fact on this issue. This submission must be rejected. The power of the Court of Appeal to make a fresh assessment of facts on the record and offer a substituted verdict can be implied from s. 10 of theCourts of Justice Act, R.S.Q., c. T 16, which provides that the Court’s power to hear appeals “shall carry with it all powers necessary to its exercise” (see also R. P. Kerans, Standards of Review Employed by Appellate Courts (1994), at p. 201).

234 We turn now to whether art. 1435 C.C.Q. applied in this case. Article 1435 C.C.Q. provides that external clauses are generally permitted, except in cases involving contracts of adhesion or consumer contracts, where, in order to be found valid, it must be proved that they have been brought to the party’s attention or that the consumer or adhering party otherwise knew of it. The first question, then, is whether Dell’s Terms and Conditions of Sale, hyperlinked to the bottom of the Configurator Page and containing the arbitration clause, constitute an external document.

235 The meaning of “external” is not defined in the C.C.Q.; however, both the doctrine and Quebec jurisprudence provide some insight into its meaning. Baudouin and Jobin provide a definition but they express ambivalence over whether, in general, hyperlinked documents are external within the meaning of art. 1435 C.C.Q.:

[TRANSLATION] [An external clause is] a stipulation set out in a document that is separate from the agreement or instrument but that, according to a clause of this agreement, is deemed to be an integral part of it and thus binding on the parties. . . . In a contract entered into via the Internet, the contracting party must use one or more hyperlinks to find the external clauses that govern the contract appearing on the screen; it might be asked whether these are in fact external clauses. The external clause concept needs to be clarified somewhat. For instance, a document that is appended to the contract and is immediately submitted to each party, or a stipulation found on the back of the instrument, is not an external clause. [Footnotes omitted.]
(Baudouin et Jobin: Les obligations, at p. 267)

236 The appellant’s submissions were along similar lines, analogizing clicking a hyperlink on a Web page to the turning of the page of a contract in paper form. There may be some merit to this argument, but it ignores the fact that a Web page can contain several hyperlinks, which can obscure the relevant link containing important information about the consumer’s legal rights.

237 S. Parisien provides better insight into when a hyperlinked document may be considered to have been expressly brought to the attention of the consumer at the moment of formation of the contract: [TRANSLATION] “A hyperlink to a document that is incorporated by reference should satisfy this condition if it is functional and clearly visible” (“La protection accord√©e aux consommateurs et le commerce √©lectronique”, in D. Poulin et al., eds., Guide juridique du commer√ßant √©lectronique (2003), at p. 178). This is a reasonable approach to the issue; it is more realistic than a general finding that hyperlink documents are either always or never external. Applied to the facts of this case, the issue would be whether the relevant hyperlink’s location and visibility on a Web page obscures it to such an extent that it can properly be said to be external.

238 It is true, as noted by the Court of Appeal, that the hyperlink to the Terms and Conditions of Sale was in smaller print, located at the bottom of the Configurator Page. The evidence was that Dell places a hyperlink to its Terms and Conditions of Sale at the bottom of every shopping page on its site. This is consistent with industry standards. In fact, this is the placement that was at the time recommended by Industry Canada’s Office of Consumer Affairs (Your Internet Business: Earning Consumer Trust — A guide to consumer protection for on-line merchants (1999), at p. 10). It is proper to assume, then, that consumers that were engaging in e-commerce at the time would have expected to find a company’s terms and conditions at the bottom of the Web page. In light of this, we conclude that the hyperlink to the Terms and Conditions was evident to Dumoulin. Furthermore, the Configurator Page contained a notice that the sale was subject to the Terms and Conditions of Sale, available by hyperlink, thus bringing the Terms and Conditions expressly to Dumoulin’s attention.

239 Upon clicking on the hyperlink, the first paragraph states, in block capital letters:

PLEASE READ THIS DOCUMENT CAREFULLY! IT CONTAINS VERY IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS, AS WELL AS LIMITATIONS AND EXCLUSIONS THAT MAY APPLY TO YOU. THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS A DISPUTE RESOLUTION CLAUSE.

This Agreement contains the terms and conditions that apply to your purchase from Dell Computer Corporation, a Canadian Corporation (“Dell”, “our” or “we”) that will be provided to you (“Customer”) on orders for computer systems and/or other products and/or services and support sold in Canada. By accepting delivery of the computer systems, other products and/or services and support described on the invoice, Customer agrees to be bound by and accepts these terms and conditions.
(Appellant’s Record, vol. III, at p. 381)

240 This warning brings the existence of the dispute resolution clause directly to the attention of the reader at the outset, and one has only to scroll down to find clause 13C, where the arbitration clause is set out to easily access all information needed about the conduct of the arbitration process. For this reason, we would reject the suggestion that the arbitration clause was buried or obscured within the Terms and Conditions of Sale. We adopt the reasoning in Kanitz v. Rogers Cable, at para. 31, regarding a very similar arbitration agreement located in a standard-form contract:

[The arbitration clause] is displayed just as all of the other clauses of the agreement are displayed. It is not contained within a larger clause dealing with other matters, nor is it in fine print or otherwise tucked away in some obscure place designed to make it discoverable only through dogged determination. The clause is upfront and easily located by anyone who wishes to take the time to scroll through the document for even a cursory review of its contents. The arbitration clause is, therefore, not at all equivalent to the fine print on the back of the rent-a-car contract in the Tilden case or on the back of the baseball ticket in the Blue Jayscase.

241 Lemelin J. concluded that it was significant that the C.C.P. governing the arbitration process could be accessed only through an outside Web site. However, what is relevant is whether the arbitration agreement itself, and not the C.C.P., was evident and accessible through the Terms and Conditions of Sale.

V. Disposition

242 For these reasons, we would dismiss the appeal with costs.

Appeal allowed with costs, BASTARACHE, LEBEL and FISH JJ. dissenting.
Full Text 

Pourvoi accueilli, les juges Bastarache, LeBel et Fish sont dissidents.

Le jugement de la juge en chef McLachlin et des juges Binnie, Deschamps, Abella, Charron et Rothstein a été rendu par

1 LA JUGE DESCHAMPS — La multiplication des √©changes commerciaux alimente sans contredit le d√©veloppement des normes r√©gissant les relations internationales. Les modes amiables de r√®glement des litiges, dont l’arbitrage, font partie des moyens que la communaut√© internationale a retenus afin d’am√©liorer l’efficacit√© des rapports √©conomiques. De fa√ßon concomitante, au Qu√©bec, l’arbitrage a pris un essor consid√©rable en raison de la flexibilit√© que ce r√©gime offre par rapport au syst√®me de justice traditionnel.

2 Le pr√©sent pourvoi s’inscrit dans le cadre du d√©bat sur la place de l’arbitrage dans le syst√®me qu√©b√©cois de justice civile. Plus pr√©cis√©ment, la Cour est appel√©e √† se pencher, dans le contexte d’un litige interne, sur la validit√© et l’applicabilit√© d’une convention d’arbitrage au regard des r√®gles du droit qu√©b√©cois et du droit international et √† d√©terminer qui de l’arbitre ou du tribunal judiciaire devrait se prononcer en premier sur ces questions.

3 Le respect de la coh√©rence interne du Code civil du Qu√©bec, L.Q. 1991, ch. 64 (« C.c.Q. »), commande une interpr√©tation contextuelle, qui a pour effet de limiter aux situations comportant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© pertinent la port√©e des dispositions du titre traitant de la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec. Parce que la prohibition visant la renonciation √† la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises pr√©vue par l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. fait partie du titre traitant de la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec, elle ne s’applique qu’aux situations comportant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© pertinent. √Čtant √† la base une institution neutre, l’arbitrage ne comporte en lui-m√™me aucun √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. Un tribunal d’arbitrage n’a de liens de rattachement que ceux qui sont voulus par les parties √† la convention d’arbitrage. L’ind√©pendance et la neutralit√© territoriale de l’arbitrage sont des caract√©ristiques qu’il faut promouvoir et pr√©server pour favoriser le d√©veloppement de cette institution. En l’esp√®ce, √† l’√©poque o√Ļ elle a √©t√© invoqu√©e, la clause d’arbitrage n’√©tait prohib√©e par aucune disposition l√©gislative qu√©b√©coise. En cons√©quence, pour les motifs exprim√©s ci-apr√®s, je suis d’avis d’accueillir le pourvoi, de renvoyer la demande de M. Dumoulin √† l’arbitrage et de rejeter la requ√™te pour autorisation d’exercer un recours collectif.

 1. Faits

4 Dell Computer Corporation (« Dell ») est une soci√©t√© qui vend au d√©tail, par Internet, du mat√©riel informatique. Elle a son si√®ge canadien √† Toronto ainsi qu’un √©tablissement √† Montr√©al. En fin d’apr√®s-midi, le vendredi 4 avril 2003, sur le site Internet anglais de Dell, les pages de commande indiquent le prix de 89 $ au lieu de 379 $ pour l’ordinateur de poche Axim X5 300 MHz et le prix de 118 $ au lieu de 549 $ pour l’ordinateur de poche Axim X5 400 MHz. Les pages du site qui annoncent les produits donnent cependant les bons prix. Le 5 avril, Dell est inform√©e des erreurs et bloque l’acc√®s aux pages de commande erron√©es par l’adresse usuelle; ces pages ne sont toutefois pas retir√©es du site. Le matin du 7 avril, M. Olivier Dumoulin, un consommateur qu√©b√©cois, est inform√© de ces prix par une de ses connaissances qui lui transmet le d√©tail de liens, qualifi√©s par les parties de « liens profonds ». Ces liens permettent d’acc√©der aux pages de commande sans passer par la voie usuelle, soit la page d’accueil et les pages d’annonce. En somme, les liens profonds permettent de contourner les mesures prises par Dell. Empruntant un lien profond, M. Dumoulin commande un ordinateur au prix de 89 $. Peu de temps apr√®s la commande de M. Dumoulin, Dell corrige les deux erreurs de prix. Le m√™me jour, Dell publie un avis de correction de prix et annonce simultan√©ment son refus de donner suite aux commandes d’ordinateurs aux prix de 89 $ et 118 $. Un employ√© de Dell t√©moigne au proc√®s que, durant cette fin de semaine, 354 consommateurs qu√©b√©cois ont command√© au total 509 de ces ordinateurs Axim, alors qu’en moyenne, au Qu√©bec, il ne s’en vend que 1 √† 3 par fin de semaine.

5 Le 17 avril, M. Dumoulin met Dell en demeure d’honorer sa commande au prix de 89 $. Devant le refus de Dell, l’Union des consommateurs et M. Dumoulin (« Union ») d√©posent une requ√™te en autorisation d’exercer un recours collectif contre Dell. Dell demande le renvoi de la demande de M. Dumoulin √† l’arbitrage en vertu de la clause d’arbitrage faisant partie des conditions de vente et le rejet de la requ√™te en recours collectif. L’Union plaide que la clause d’arbitrage est nulle et, de toute fa√ßon, inopposable √† M. Dumoulin.

2. Historique judiciaire

6 La juge de premi√®re instance souligne que la clause d’arbitrage pr√©cise que l’arbitrage est r√©gi par les r√®gles du National Arbitration Forum (« NAF »), qui est « situ√© aux √Čtats-Unis », ce qui l’am√®ne √† conclure √† l’existence d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© suivant les r√®gles du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois et √† l’application de la prohibition de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. tel qu’il a √©t√© interpr√©t√© dans l’arr√™t Dominion Bridge Corp. c. Knai, [1998] R.J.Q. 321 (C.A.). Selon la juge, la clause d’arbitrage est inopposable √† M. Dumoulin. Elle examine ensuite les crit√®res donnant ouverture √† l’exercice d’un recours collectif et autorise le recours contre Dell ([2004] J.Q. no 155 (QL)).

7 La Cour d’appel rejette le pourvoi form√© par Dell √† l’encontre de cette d√©cision ([2005] R.J.Q. 1448, 2005 QCCA 570). D’abord, elle exprime son d√©saccord avec l’application par la Cour sup√©rieure des r√®gles du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois. La Cour d’appel est d’avis qu’il ne s’agit pas d’une situation o√Ļ le consommateur a renonc√© √† la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises. Elle signale que les parties admettent que le litige est r√©gi par les lois applicables au Qu√©bec et que l’arbitrage peut √™tre tenu au Qu√©bec. Selon la Cour d’appel, il ne s’agit pas d’un cas d’application de l’arr√™t Dominion Bridge, o√Ļ un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© entra√ģnait l’application de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. La Cour d’appel conclut cependant que la clause d’arbitrage est externe au contrat. Comme Dell n’a pas prouv√© que la clause avait √©t√© port√©e √† la connaissance du consommateur, elle lui est inopposable suivant l’art. 1435 C.c.Q. La Cour d’appel traite ensuite bri√®vement de l’arbitrabilit√© d’une question relevant de la Loi sur la protection du consommateur, L.R.Q., ch. P-40.1, et juge que le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois n’a pas eu l’intention, en cette mati√®re, d’√©carter tout arbitrage. Enfin, elle expose l’argument suivant lequel la proc√©dure de recours collectif aurait pr√©s√©ance sur l’arbitrage, mais ne le retient pas, mentionnant plut√īt que les diff√©rends qui ne peuvent √™tre soumis √† l’arbitrage sont pr√©vus par le Code civil du Qu√©bec et par des lois sp√©cifiques.

8 Le 9 novembre 2006, le ministre de la Justice du Qu√©bec a d√©pos√© devant l’Assembl√©e nationale le projet de loi 48, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la protection du consommateur et la Loi sur le recouvrement de certaines cr√©ances (2e sess., 37e l√©g.) (« Loi 48 »). L’une de ses dispositions pr√©voit qu’il est interdit d’imposer √† un consommateur le recours √† l’arbitrage en cas de litige. La Loi 48, qui est entr√©e en vigueur le lendemain de l’audition du pr√©sent pourvoi devant la Cour, ne comporte pas de disposition transitoire applicable √† la pr√©sente affaire.

3. Position des parties

9 Devant notre Cour, les parties reprennent les arguments soulev√©s devant la Cour sup√©rieure et la Cour d’appel. En particulier, Dell soutient que la clause d’arbitrage n’est prohib√©e par aucune disposition l√©gislative qu√©b√©coise. Elle ne serait donc ni contraire √† l’ordre public, ni prohib√©e par l’art. 3149 C.c.Q., ni externe ni abusive. De plus, Dell soutient que les tribunaux se limitent √† une analyse sommaire (appel√©e aussi — prima facie —) de la validit√© des clauses d’arbitrage, laissant √† l’arbitre la responsabilit√© de les √©valuer au fond. Cette approche, qui d√©coule du principe dit de « comp√©tence-comp√©tence », a, selon Dell, √©t√© implicitement adopt√©e par la Cour dans Desputeaux c. √Čditions Chouette (1987) inc., [2003] 1 R.C.S. 178, 2003 CSC 17, et elle aurait d√Ľ √™tre appliqu√©e en l’esp√®ce par la Cour sup√©rieure pour renvoyer le dossier √† l’arbitre, afin qu’il √©value la validit√© de la clause au regard des arguments plaid√©s par l’Union. Cette derni√®re ne se prononce pas sur l’intensit√© de l’examen de la validit√© de la clause d’arbitrage, mais prend une position inverse √† celle de Dell sur tous les autres points.

10 √Ä la suite de l’entr√©e en vigueur de la Loi 48, la Cour a demand√© aux parties de pr√©senter des observations √©crites concernant l’applicabilit√© de cette loi √† la pr√©sente affaire. Dell avance trois arguments au soutien de sa pr√©tention suivant laquelle la Loi 48 n’a aucun effet sur la pr√©sente affaire : d’abord, cette loi n’a pas d’effet r√©troactif; ensuite, la loi nouvelle ne peut s’appliquer aux litiges en cours d’instance; enfin, Dell invoque un droit acquis √† la proc√©dure d’arbitrage pr√©vue par le contrat intervenu avec M. Dumoulin. L’Union ne fait valoir qu’un seul argument : la disposition qui traite des clauses d’arbitrage ne fait que confirmer une prohibition d√©j√† en vigueur.

11 Les questions soulev√©es par les parties sont nombreuses. Dans le contexte du pr√©sent litige, celle qui me para√ģt la plus importante touche √† l’application de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. Cette question est non seulement potentiellement d√©terminante pour les parties, mais elle concerne aussi l’ordonnancement des r√®gles dans le Code civil du Qu√©bec; la r√©ponse qui y sera donn√©e aura des r√©percussions sur l’interpr√©tation des autres dispositions du titre dans lequel figure cet article et sur l’interpr√©tation du Code en g√©n√©ral. L’analyse de ce point m’am√®nera √† me pencher sur l’influence des normes internationales sur le droit qu√©b√©cois. Ces normes sont aussi pertinentes pour r√©pondre √† une autre question, celle de l’application du principe de comp√©tence-comp√©tence √† l’examen de la demande de renvoi √† l’arbitrage. Je conclurai que l’arbitre a comp√©tence pour √©valuer la validit√© et l’applicabilit√© de la clause d’arbitrage et que, sauf exceptions, la d√©cision sur la comp√©tence devrait lui appartenir en premier lieu. Cependant, compte tenu de l’√©tat du dossier, je traiterai de toutes les questions soulev√©es.

4. Application de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q.

12 Il est utile de rappeler le texte et le contexte de la disposition dont l’application est en litige. Cette disposition est r√©dig√©e ainsi :


3149. Les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises sont, en outre, comp√©tentes pour conna√ģtre d’une action fond√©e sur un contrat de consommation ou sur un contrat de travail si le consommateur ou le travailleur a son domicile ou sa r√©sidence au Qu√©bec; la renonciation du consommateur ou du travailleur √† cette comp√©tence ne peut lui √™tre oppos√©e.

Elle fait partie du titre troisi√®me « De la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec », lequel se trouve dans le livre dixi√®me du Code civil du Qu√©bec « Du droit international priv√© ». La Cour doit d√©cider si cette disposition s’applique en l’esp√®ce. √Ä mon avis, elle ne s’applique que dans les situations comportant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© pertinent qui justifie le recours aux r√®gles du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois. J’explique pourquoi.

4.1 Contexte d’application des r√®gles de comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises

4.1.1 Objet et conséquences de la codification du droit international privé dans le Code civil du Québec

13 Lorsque le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois amorce la r√©forme du droit civil au milieu du 20e si√®cle, sa d√©marche s’inscrit dans la plus pure tradition civiliste. Le professeur Cr√©peau dit ceci √† cet √©gard :

Le Code civil constitue un ensemble organique, ordonné, structuré, agencé et cohérent des matières substantielles de droit privé, régissant, dans la tradition civiliste, la condition juridique des personnes et des biens, de même que les relations entre les personnes elles-mêmes, et les rapports entre les personnes et les biens.
(P.-A. Cr√©peau, « Une certaine conception de la recodification », dans Du Code civil du Qu√©bec : Contribution √† l’histoire imm√©diate d’une recodification r√©ussie (2005), 23, p. 40)

14 La codification implique donc une r√©flexion sur l’ensemble des normes et sur leur organisation √† l’int√©rieur d’un document central dans le but de simplifier les r√®gles, de les clarifier et, ainsi, de les rendre plus accessibles. L’organisation des normes constitue une caract√©ristique essentielle de la codification. Les professeurs Brierley et Macdonald d√©crivent l’impact de cette caract√©ristique sur la pr√©sentation et l’interpr√©tation du Code civil :

[traduction] Plusieurs postulats quant √† la forme sous‚ÄĎtendent l’√©dification d’un code civil. Ils ont en commun d’√™tre li√©s aux notions de rationalit√© et de syst√©matisation, si bien d√©crites par l’expression « rationalit√© formelle » utilis√©e par Weber. Affirmer qu’un code civil est et doit √™tre consid√©r√© comme syst√©matique et organis√© rationnellement suppose qu’il correspond √† un mod√®le int√©gr√© de pr√©sentation du droit qui a √©t√© choisi consciemment et suivi avec constance. . .
(. . .)
Le caract√®re rationnel et syst√©matique du Code touche √©galement son mode de pr√©sentation. Une des caract√©ristiques principales du Code est sa structure taxinomique, qui influe tant sur son organisation que sur son style de r√©daction. Tout comme la simple existence d’un Code d√©sign√© sous le nom de « Code civil » pr√©suppose un univers juridique plus vaste qui peut √™tre divis√© et subdivis√© — en droit public et droit priv√©; puis, √† l’int√©rieur du droit priv√©, en droit proc√©dural et droit substantiel; et, √† l’int√©rieur du droit priv√© substantiel, en droit commercial et droit civil — le m√™me mod√®le taxinomique est transpos√© dans le Code lui‚ÄĎm√™me. Ce dernier est d’abord divis√© en grands livres — par exemple, des personnes, des biens, des modes d’acquisition des biens, du droit commercial — chacun d’eux √©tant subdivis√©s en titres. Les titres du Code sont subdivis√©s en chapitres qui, √† leur tour, sont divis√©s en sections et parfois en sous‚ÄĎsections. Ainsi, toutes les notions relevant d’un domaine particulier du droit sont d√©riv√©es logiquement des principes fondamentaux, d√©velopp√©es m√©ticuleusement et ordonn√©es syst√©matiquement. . .

Dans ce mode de pr√©sentation architectonique, la liste des objets s√©lectionn√©s et leur ordonnancement servent √† pr√©ciser la signification que chacun d’eux peut avoir. Les choix organisationnels initiaux influent directement sur la fa√ßon dont le Code s’adapte aux changements de circonstances. . .
 (J. E. C. Brierley et R. A. Macdonald, Quebec Civil Law : An Introduction to Quebec Private Law (1993), p. 102‚ÄĎ104)

15 Dans ses commentaires sur le Code civil du Qu√©bec, le ministre de la Justice du Qu√©bec confirme que le Code « constitue un ensemble l√©gislatif structur√© et hi√©rarchis√© » : Commentaires du ministre de la Justice (1993), t. I, p. VII. Il ne saurait donc √™tre question de tenir pour acquis que les dispositions du Code civil du Qu√©bec ont √©t√© plac√©es dans un titre ou dans un autre de fa√ßon √©parse et sans souci de coh√©rence de la part des juristes qui ont particip√© √† la r√©forme. Le processus de codification suppose l’ordonnancement des normes et les dispositions du titre sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec refl√®tent cette philosophie g√©n√©rale de la codification.

4.1.2 Le domaine du droit international privé

16 Le droit international priv√© est la branche du droit interne de chaque √Čtat qui r√©git les rapports de nature priv√©e dont la port√©e « exc√®de le cadre d’un seul ordre juridique national » : √Č. Wyler et A. Papaux, « Extran√©it√© de valeurs et de syst√®mes en droit international priv√© et en droit international public », dans √Č. Wyler et A. Papaux, dir., L’extran√©it√© ou le d√©passement de l’ordre juridique √©tatique (1999), 239, p. 241. Comme chaque √Čtat poss√®de le pouvoir d’adopter son propre syst√®me de r√®gles, il en r√©sulte une vari√©t√© de conceptions du droit international priv√©. Ainsi, pour certains pays, ce domaine se limite aux questions relatives aux conflits de lois, alors qu’en France, le droit international priv√© couvre un plus large domaine et s’√©tend √©galement aux questions concernant la condition des √©trangers et la nationalit√© des personnes. Le droit international priv√© anglais a adopt√© une conception interm√©diaire et r√©git g√©n√©ralement trois types de questions : (i) les conflits de lois, (ii) les conflits de juridictions et (iii) la reconnaissance et l’ex√©cution des d√©cisions √©trang√®res : Dicey, Morris and Collins on the Conflict of Laws (14e √©d. 2006), vol. 1, p. 4; P. North et J. J. Fawcett, Cheshire and North’s Private International Law (13e √©d. 1999), p. 7. Mais qu’en est-il du droit qu√©b√©cois?

4.1.3 Historique législatif du droit international privé québécois

17 Les premi√®res r√®gles du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois √©taient naturellement inspir√©es du droit fran√ßais. √Ä l’image du Code Napol√©on, le Code civil du Bas Canada ne contenait qu’un nombre limit√© d’articles qui, avec quelques dispositions du Code de proc√©dure civile, L.R.Q., ch. C‚ÄĎ25 (« C.p.c. »), et de lois particuli√®res, ont compos√©, jusqu’√† l’adoption du Code civil du Qu√©bec en 1991, le droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois.

18 Alors que le droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois traversait, au 19e et au d√©but du 20e si√®cle, une p√©riode de stagnation relative, un nombre grandissant d’√Čtats ont emprunt√© la voie de la codification, adoptant des r√®gles de plus en plus compl√®tes et syst√©matiques : B. Audit, Droit international priv√© (4e √©d. 2006), par. 37; A. N. Makarov, « Sources », dans International Association of Legal Science, International Encyclopedia of Comparative Law, vol. III, Private International Law (1972), ch. 2, p. 4-5. Le projet de codification du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois s’est inscrit dans ce dernier mouvement et a fait partie du projet g√©n√©ral de r√©forme du Code civil officiellement confi√© en 1965 √† l’Office de r√©vision du Code civil (« Office »).

19 En 1975, un premier projet de codification des r√®gles de droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois a √©t√© soumis √† l’Office par son comit√© du droit international priv√©, que pr√©sidait le professeur J.-G. Castel. Le contenu de ce rapport a √©t√© l√©g√®rement modifi√© et int√©gr√© deux ans plus tard dans le livre neuvi√®me du Projet de Code civil (Office de r√©vision du Code civil, Rapport sur le Code civil du Qu√©bec (1978), vol. I, Projet de Code civil, p. 597 et suiv.). Le chapitre pr√©liminaire et le chapitre I √©noncent des dispositions d’ordre g√©n√©ral. Le chapitre II porte sur les conflits de lois alors que le chapitre III traite des conflits de juridictions. Les chapitres IV et V traitent de la reconnaissance et de l’ex√©cution des d√©cisions √©trang√®res et des sentences arbitrales √©trang√®res. Enfin, le chapitre VI codifie les immunit√©s de juridiction civile et d’ex√©cution dont jouissent les √Čtats √©trangers et certains autres acteurs internationaux.

20 La structure de ce livre t√©moigne de l’adoption par le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois de la conception interm√©diaire du droit international priv√© anglais, telle que l’ont d√©crite les auteurs Dicey, Morris et Collins et North et Fawcett mentionn√©s pr√©c√©demment. Cette d√©cision de l’Office est le r√©sultat d’un processus qui s’est √©chelonn√© sur plusieurs ann√©es.

21 L’Office pr√©cise que l’adoption du chapitre III traitant des conflits de juridictions vise √† suppl√©er √† l’absence de r√®gles propres au droit international priv√©, situation qui obligeait les tribunaux √† recourir aux dispositions du Code de proc√©dure civile traitant des districts judiciaires au Qu√©bec o√Ļ les actions pouvaient √™tre intent√©es :

Pour rem√©dier √† cet √©tat de choses et distinguer entre la comp√©tence internationale et la comp√©tence locale, il a paru n√©cessaire de pr√©senter des r√®gles s’appliquant uniquement √† des situations contenant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. [Je souligne.]
(Office de révision du Code civil, Rapport sur le Code civil du Québec (1978), vol. II, t. 2, Commentaires, p. 981)

22 Les Commentaires du ministre de la Justice accompagnant le texte final du Code civil du Qu√©bec soulignent, √† de multiples reprises, que le champ d’application des diverses sections du livre dixi√®me du Code civil vise les situations juridiques « pr√©sentant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© ». Cette pr√©cision est express√©ment reprise dans l’introduction du titre troisi√®me sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises (t. II, p. 1998). Le ministre r√©it√®re aussi les commentaires de l’Office sur la n√©cessit√© de cr√©er, pour le droit international priv√©, un r√©gime de r√®gles de comp√©tence juridictionnelle distinct de celui pr√©vu au Code de proc√©dure civile auquel se reportaient les tribunaux jusque-l√† :

Comme il n’existait pas de r√®gles pour d√©terminer la comp√©tence des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec dans les litiges pr√©sentant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, la jurisprudence avait √©tendu √† ces situations les r√®gles de comp√©tence du droit interne, pr√©vues au Code de proc√©dure civile.

L’objectif g√©n√©ral du Titre troisi√®me est de rem√©dier √† cette lacune, en pr√©voyant des r√®gles sp√©cifiques pour d√©terminer la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec . . .
(Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, t. II, p. 1998)

23 Ces commentaires mettent en lumi√®re la distinction entre les r√®gles de comp√©tence r√©gissant les litiges purement internes et celles qui, en raison d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, font partie du droit international priv√©. Pour les litiges internes, le Code de proc√©dure civile r√®gle la question de la comp√©tence juridictionnelle. En l’esp√®ce, ce sont les art. 31 et 1000 C.p.c. qui attribuent comp√©tence √† la Cour sup√©rieure du Qu√©bec en mati√®re de recours collectif.

24 Compte tenu du fait que les litiges internes sont r√©gis par les dispositions g√©n√©rales du droit interne qu√©b√©cois, il n’y a pas de raison de recourir aux r√®gles traitant de la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises lorsqu’un litige ne pr√©sente aucun √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©.

4.2 Notion d’extran√©it√©

25 Quel est cet √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© omnipr√©sent dans la litt√©rature sur le droit international priv√©? Peu d’analyses y sont consacr√©es. Il faut dire que l’aspect international ressort habituellement dans les litiges o√Ļ les r√®gles du droit international priv√© sont invoqu√©es, d’o√Ļ l’absence de n√©cessit√© pour les tribunaux de s’√©tendre sur les param√®tres de cette notion d’extran√©it√©. On trouve une mention de cette notion dans l’arr√™t Quebecor Printing Memphis Inc. c. Regenair Inc., [2001] R.J.Q. 966 (C.A.), par. 17, o√Ļ le juge Philippon (ad hoc), dissident sur une autre question, √©nonce l’√©tape initiale de la m√©thode d’analyse en droit international priv√© :

Dans un premier temps, il fallait d√©terminer si le litige √©tait relatif √† une situation internationale ou √† un √©v√©nement transf[r]ontalier ou pr√©sentant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. [Italique omis.]

26 Il est cependant possible de cerner cet √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. Il doit s’agir d’« un point de contact juridiquement pertinent avec un √Čtat √©tranger », c’est-√†-dire un contact suffisant pour jouer un r√īle dans la d√©termination de la juridiction comp√©tente : J. A. Talpis et J.-G. Castel, « Le Code Civil du Qu√©bec : Interpr√©tation des r√®gles du droit international priv√© », dans La r√©forme du Code civil (1993), t. 3, 801, p. 870 (je souligne); Castel & Walker : Canadian Conflict of Laws (feuilles mobiles), vol. 1, p. 1-1; voir aussi Wyler et Papaux, p. 256.

27 Comme notre droit international priv√© est d’inspiration anglaise, il est utile d’examiner l’√©tat du droit anglais sur cette question. Voici comment les auteurs North et Fawcett d√©finissent le droit international priv√© :

[TRADUCTION] Le droit international priv√© est donc la partie du droit qui entre en jeu lorsque la question soumise au tribunal concerne un fait, un √©v√©nement ou une op√©ration ayant un lien si √©troit avec un syst√®me de droit √©tranger qu’il faut n√©cessairement recourir √† ce syst√®me. [Je souligne; p. 5.]

Cette d√©finition se rapproche de celle adopt√©e par les auteurs canadiens et contient une notion famili√®re √† bien des syst√®mes de droit international priv√© : le facteur de rattachement √† un r√©gime particulier. Il s’ensuit que l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© et le facteur de rattachement sont deux notions qui se recoupent. Un auteur d√©crit ainsi ce qu’est un facteur de rattachement :

[TRADUCTION] Le facteur de rattachement est l’√©l√©ment factuel propre √† l’affaire que l’on choisit pour rattacher une question de droit √† un syst√®me juridique. Le facteur de rattachement d√©termine le droit applicable ou la comp√©tence d’un tribunal. Par exemple, si les faits soul√®vent une question de succession ab intestat mobili√®re, l’√©l√©ment factuel choisi pour la d√©signation du droit applicable pourrait √™tre le lieu du dernier domicile du d√©funt, son dernier lieu de r√©sidence habituelle ou sa nationalit√©, ou le lieu o√Ļ se trouvent les biens meubles. De m√™me, un de ces facteurs de rattachement pourrait servir √† d√©terminer la comp√©tence d’un tribunal √† l’√©gard d’une successionab intestat mobili√®re.
(F. Vischer, « Connecting Factors », dans International Association of Legal Science, International Encyclopedia of Comparative Law, vol. III, Private International Law (1999), ch. 4, p. 3)

Voir aussi Y. Loussouarn, P. Bourel et P. de Vareilles-Sommi√®res, Droit international priv√© (8e √©d. 2004), p. 2. Le droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois reconna√ģt lui aussi les concepts de facteur de rattachement et d’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© : Talpis et Castel, p. 870; C. Emanuelli, Droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois (2e √©d. 2006), p. 11-12.

28 Rattachement et extran√©it√© peuvent donc se chevaucher. Le facteur de rattachement est un lien avec le syst√®me juridique interne ou un syst√®me juridique √©tranger, alors que l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© signale la possibilit√© d’un lien avec un syst√®me juridique √©tranger. Ainsi, dans une action personnelle intent√©e au Qu√©bec, le domicile qu√©b√©cois du d√©fendeur constitue un facteur de rattachement au droit qu√©b√©cois mais non un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, alors que le domicile anglais du d√©fendeur sera consid√©r√© √† la fois comme un facteur de rattachement au ressort anglais et un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© par rapport au r√©gime qu√©b√©cois. Plusieurs des facteurs de rattachement √©num√©r√©s dans la d√©finition ci-dessus du professeur Vischer sont d’ailleurs communs √† la majorit√© des r√©gimes de droit international priv√© (voir en ce sens les √©num√©rations figurant dans Loussouarn, Bourel et de Vareilles-Sommi√®res, p. 2; North et Fawcett, p. 5).

29 Un √Čtat peut pr√©ciser les facteurs de rattachement ou d’extran√©it√© qu’il estime pertinents. Au Qu√©bec, le l√©gislateur a retenu plusieurs facteurs faisant d√©j√† partie des principaux syst√®mes occidentaux de droit international priv√©. Dans le titre du Code civil du Qu√©bec sur les conflits de lois, ces facteurs sont r√©partis dans quatre grandes cat√©gories qui font chacune l’objet d’un chapitre distinct : premi√®rement, les facteurs personnels, dont le principal est le lieu du domicile; deuxi√®mement, les facteurs r√©els; troisi√®mement, les facteurs li√©s aux obligations, par exemple le lieu o√Ļ le contrat est conclu; quatri√®mement, les facteurs reli√©s √† la proc√©dure — celle-ci suivant g√©n√©ralement la loi du lieu du tribunal saisi du litige (art. 3083 √† 3133 C.c.Q.).

30 Pour ce qui est de la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec, qui fait l’objet d’un titre distinct, le l√©gislateur a aussi pr√©vu certains facteurs de rattachement. Parmi ceux-ci, le lieu du domicile d’une des parties figure encore en t√™te de liste. L’article 3148 C.c.Q. l’illustre bien :

3148. Dans les actions personnelles à caractère patrimonial, les autorités québécoises sont compétentes dans les cas suivants :

1° Le d√©fendeur a son domicile ou sa r√©sidence au Qu√©bec;

2° Le d√©fendeur est une personne morale qui n’est pas domicili√©e au Qu√©bec mais y a un √©tablissement et la contestation est relative √† son activit√© au Qu√©bec;

3° Une faute a √©t√© commise au Qu√©bec, un pr√©judice y a √©t√© subi, un fait dommageable s’y est produit ou l’une des obligations d√©coulant d’un contrat devait y √™tre ex√©cut√©e;

4° Les parties, par convention, leur ont soumis les litiges n√©s ou √† na√ģtre entre elles √† l’occasion d’un rapport de droit d√©termin√©;

5° Le d√©fendeur a reconnu leur comp√©tence.

Cependant, les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises ne sont pas comp√©tentes lorsque les parties ont choisi, par convention, de soumettre les litiges n√©s ou √† na√ģtre entre elles, √† propos d’un rapport juridique d√©termin√©, √† une autorit√© √©trang√®re ou √† un arbitre, √† moins que le d√©fendeur n’ait reconnu la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises.

Voir aussi les art. 3134, 3141 √† 3147, 3149, 3150, 3154, al. 2 C.c.Q. Par ailleurs, sont √©galement consid√©r√©s le lieu o√Ļ un pr√©judice est subi ou un fait dommageable s’est produit (art. 3148, al. 1(3) C.c.Q.), ainsi que le lieu o√Ļ le bien en litige est situ√© (art. 3152 √† 3154, al. 1 C.c.Q.).

31 On remarque que le lien commun entre ces facteurs traditionnels est leur rattachement concret au for qu√©b√©cois; on inf√®re que si le droit international priv√© est mis en cause, c’est qu’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© tout aussi concret peut faire jouer un r√©gime juridique √©tranger. Malgr√© les d√©veloppements dont je viens de faire √©tat, il convient tout de m√™me de s’interroger sur le postulat suivant lequel les r√®gles du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois n’entrent en jeu qu’en pr√©sence d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©.

32 Dans le Projet de Code civil de l’Office, il √©tait clair que l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© √©tait requis. Dans ses commentaires sur la disposition traitant de la loi applicable aux actes juridiques, l’Office a dit ceci :

On notera que le texte s’applique aux actes juridiques pr√©sentant un caract√®re international. Les parties ne peuvent se r√©f√©rer √† une loi quelconque, qui n’aurait aucun rapport avec leur acte, √† moins que ce dernier ne pr√©sente un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©.

(Office de r√©vision du Code civil, Rapport sur le Code civil du Qu√©bec, vol. II, t. 2, Commentaires p. 993 (commentaires sur l’art. 21 du livre neuvi√®me du Projet de Code civil))

Au sujet de l’art. 48 du livre neuvi√®me du Projet de Code civil, qui est l’anc√™tre de l’art. 3148 C.c.Q. sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises, l’Office √©crit que les r√®gles de comp√©tence √©nonc√©es √† cet article « sont destin√©es √† s’appliquer √† des situations contenant un √©l√©ment √©tranger » (Office de r√©vision du Code civil, vol. II, t. 2, p. 1004).

33 L’avant-projet de loi de 1988 n’a pas chang√© le fond de la question quant √† l’exigence d’extran√©it√© traditionnelle (Loi portant r√©forme au Code civil du Qu√©bec du droit de la preuve et de la prescription et du droit international priv√©). Voici d’ailleurs le texte de son art. 3477 sur la d√©signation du droit applicable, dont le libell√© se rapproche consid√©rablement de sa version finale au Code civil du Qu√©bec (art. 3111) :

3477. L’acte juridique pr√©sentant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© est r√©gi par la loi d√©sign√©e express√©ment dans l’acte ou dont la d√©signation r√©sulte d’une fa√ßon certaine des dispositions de cet acte.

On peut d√©signer express√©ment la loi applicable √† la totalit√© ou √† une partie seulement d’un acte juridique.

34 La mention de l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© dans cet article a amen√© les professeurs Talpis et Goldstein √† s’interroger sur la n√©cessit√© d’une telle pr√©cision, car l’exigence d’extran√©it√© leur paraissait incontournable :

On peut se demander d’abord s’il √©tait n√©cessaire de pr√©ciser que les parties ne peuvent choisir la loi applicable que dans le cas d’un contrat « pr√©sentant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© ». Il est √©vident que la condition sine qua non de l’utilisation de toutes les r√®gles du Livre dix du futur Code civil est l’existence d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. Cependant, cet Avant-Projet ne comportant pas de disposition traitant sp√©cifiquement de la fraude √† la loi, on a peut-√™tre tent√©, par cette pr√©cision, d’affirmer que la volont√© des parties ne suffit pas √† rendre international un contrat que tout rattache au Qu√©bec. [Je souligne.]
(J. A. Talpis et G. Goldstein, « Analyse critique de l’avant-projet de loi du Qu√©bec en droit international priv√© » (1989), 91 R. du N. 456, p. 476)

Quant √† l’art. 3511 de l’avant-projet de loi de 1988, qui traitait de la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises, tous les √©l√©ments substantiels du futur art. 3148 C.c.Q. s’y retrouvaient d√©j√†.

35 Le projet de loi 125 de 1990, Code civil du Qu√©bec, ne retient cependant pas l’exigence de l’extran√©it√© pour ce qui est de la d√©signation du droit applicable. Le l√©gislateur y a int√©gr√© une r√®gle particuli√®re. Dans sa version finale, l’art. 3111 C.c.Q. comprend un ajout par rapport au texte initialement propos√© :

3111. L’acte juridique, qu’il pr√©sente ou non un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, est r√©gi par la loi d√©sign√©e express√©ment dans l’acte ou dont la d√©signation r√©sulte d’une fa√ßon certaine des dispositions de cet acte.

N√©anmoins, s’il ne pr√©sente aucun √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, il demeure soumis aux dispositions imp√©ratives de la loi de l’√Čtat qui s’appliquerait en l’absence de d√©signation.

On peut d√©signer express√©ment la loi applicable √† la totalit√© ou √† une partie seulement d’un acte juridique.

Cet ajout introduit au titre traitant des conflits de lois la possibilit√© pour les parties de pr√©voir qu’un acte juridique purement interne sera r√©gi par une loi √©trang√®re. Cependant, imm√©diatement apr√®s avoir reconnu l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties pour la d√©signation du droit applicable, le l√©gislateur s’est empress√© de la limiter √† l’al. 2. Par cons√©quent, en l’absence d’extran√©it√©, l’acte juridique demeure soumis aux r√®gles imp√©ratives qui s’y appliqueraient en l’absence de d√©signation. La d√©signation d’une loi √©trang√®re sans que l’acte ne pr√©sente d’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© est donc un cas particulier prudemment introduit en droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois et est confin√© aux r√®gles des conflits de lois.

36 Je pr√©cise que la formulation de l’art. 3111 C.c.Q. s’inspire de l’art. 3 de la Convention sur la loi applicable aux obligations contractuelles (Convention de Rome de 1980) qui permet les « choix [de] loi √©trang√®re » en l’absence d’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. On peut aussi concevoir que la d√©termination du droit applicable √† un acte juridique repose parfois sur une analyse plus complexe que celle faite en mati√®re de comp√©tence juridictionnelle. Ainsi, un acte juridique — par exemple une s√Ľret√© — peut n’avoir en apparence que des liens internes, alors qu’en r√©alit√© cet acte fait partie d’une op√©ration internationale dont les ramifications ne sont pas en cause dans un litige donn√©. Plusieurs explications peuvent donc √™tre fournies pour l’exception faite au titre deuxi√®me traitant des conflits de lois.

37 Dans le cas du titre sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises, aucune exception n’est faite √† l’√©gard de l’exigence d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© et il est clair que les tribunaux √† qui l’on demande d’appliquer des r√®gles de droit international priv√© doivent d’abord d√©terminer si la situation pr√©sente un tel √©l√©ment. Cette position est conforme √† la d√©finition traditionnelle du droit international priv√© et √† l’intention de l’Office. Il reste √† se demander si le choix de la proc√©dure d’arbitrage constitue, en l’esp√®ce, un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© susceptible de justifier l’application de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. Pour r√©pondre √† cette question, il faut examiner comment l’arbitrage est int√©gr√© au droit qu√©b√©cois.

4.3 L’arbitrage au Qu√©bec

4.3.1 Les sources internationales

38 Le droit international de l’arbitrage est fortement influenc√© par deux textes √©labor√©s sous les auspices de l’Organisation des Nations Unies : la Convention pour la reconnaissance et l’ex√©cution des sentences arbitrales √©trang√®res, 330 R.T.N.U. 3 (« Convention de New York »), et la Loi type de la CNUDCI sur l’arbitrage commercial international, Doc. N.U. A/40/17 (1985), annexe I (« Loi type »).

39 La Convention de New York est entr√©e en vigueur en 1959. Son article II pr√©voit qu’un tribunal d’un √Čtat contractant doit renvoyer les parties √† l’arbitrage s’il est saisi d’un litige portant sur une question couverte par une clause d’arbitrage. √Ä ce jour, 142 pays sont parties √† cette convention. Ce nombre √©lev√© d’adh√©sions t√©moigne d’un large consensus √† l’√©gard de la reconnaissance de l’institution de l’arbitrage. Lord Mustill a d’ailleurs √©crit les commentaires suivants au sujet de cette convention :

[TRADUCTION] Cette Convention est l’instrument international en mati√®re d’arbitrage qui a connu le plus grand succ√®s et dont on pourrait peut-√™tre affirmer qu’il s’agit de la loi internationale qui s’est av√©r√©e la plus efficace de toute l’histoire du droit commercial.
(M. J. Mustill, « Arbitration : History and Background » (1989), 6 J. Int’l Arb. 43, p. 49)

Le Canada a adhéré à la Convention de New York le 12 mai 1986.

40 La Loi type est un autre texte fondamental en mati√®re d’arbitrage commercial international. Il s’agit d’un mod√®le de loi que l’ONU recommande aux √Čtats de prendre en consid√©ration afin d’uniformiser les r√®gles d’arbitrage commercial international. La Loi type a √©t√© r√©dig√©e de fa√ßon √† √™tre conforme √† la Convention de New York : F. Bachand, « Does Article 8 of the Model Law Call for Full or Prima Facie Review of the Arbitral Tribunal’s Jurisdiction? » (2006), 22 Arb. Int’l 463, p. 470; S. Kierstead, « Referral to Arbitration under Article 8 of the UNCITRAL Model Law : The Canadian Approach » (1999), 31 Rev. can. dr. comm. 98, p. 100-101.

41 Le texte final de la Loi type a √©t√© adopt√© le 21 juin 1985 par la Commission des Nations Unies pour le droit commercial international (« CNUDCI »). Dans sa note explicative relative √† la Loi type, le Secr√©tariat de la CNUDCI dit que celle-ci traduit un consensus mondial sur les principes et les points importants de la pratique de l’arbitrage international. Elle est acceptable pour les Etats de toutes les r√©gions et convient aux diff√©rents syst√®mes juridiques et √©conomiques du monde entier.
(« Note explicative du Secr√©tariat de la CNUDCI relative √† la Loi type de la CNUDCI sur l’arbitrage commercial international », Doc. N.U. A/40/17, annexe 1, par. 2)

En 1986, le Parlement s’est fond√© sur la Loi type pour adopter la Loi sur l’arbitrage commercial, L.R.C. 1985, ch. 17 (2e suppl.). Le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois a embo√ģt√© le pas la m√™me ann√©e et l’a int√©gr√©e √† son corpus l√©gislatif. Le ministre de la Justice du Qu√©bec de l’√©poque, Herbert Marx, a repris √† son compte le commentaire formul√© par le Secr√©tariat de la CNUDCI cit√© ci-dessus : Assembl√©e nationale, Journal des d√©bats, vol. 29, no 46, 1re sess., 33e l√©g., 16 juin 1986, p. 2975, et vol. 29, no 55, 30 octobre 1986, p. 3672.

4.3.2 La nature et la portée des amendements législatifs de 1986 au Code civil du Bas Canada et au Code de procédure civile

42 En 1986, le l√©gislateur a d√©pos√© la Loi modifiant le Code civil et le Code de proc√©dure civile en mati√®re d’arbitrage, L.Q. 1986, ch. 73 (« Loi 91 »), qui instaure un r√©gime visant √† favoriser la tenue d’arbitrages au Qu√©bec. La Loi 91 a ajout√© au Code civil du Bas Canada un nouveau titre consacr√© √† la convention d’arbitrage. Ce titre n’est compos√© que de six dispositions qui √©noncent quelques principes g√©n√©raux relatifs √† la validit√© et l’applicabilit√© de ces conventions. La d√©cision du l√©gislateur d’ins√©rer la convention d’arbitrage parmi les contrats nomm√©s du Code civil du Bas Canada est significative. Dor√©navant, il n’y a plus de raison de voir la convention d’arbitrage comme exorbitante du droit commun; au contraire, elle en fait partie int√©grante : Condominiums Mont St-Sauveur inc. c. Constructions Serge Sauv√© lt√©e, [1990] R.J.Q. 2783 (C.A.), p. 2785; J. E. C. Brierley, « De la convention d’arbitrage : Articles 2638-2643 », dans La r√©forme du Code civil (1993), t. 2, 1067, p. 1068-1069. Les dispositions introduites par la Loi 91 seront reprises sans grand changement dans le chapitre sur la convention d’arbitrage du Code civil du Qu√©bec.

43 Le Code de proc√©dure civile a lui aussi √©t√© touch√© de fa√ßon importante. La Loi 91 a enrichi substantiellement son livre VII sur les arbitrages, qui est dor√©navant divis√© en deux titres. Le titre premier est un v√©ritable code de proc√©dure arbitrale qui r√©glemente toutes les √©tapes d’un arbitrage assujetti aux lois qu√©b√©coises, et ce, de la nomination des arbitres jusqu’aux √©tapes de la sentence et de l’homologation, en passant par le d√©roulement de l’instance arbitrale. Il s’agit de r√®gles qui, en majorit√©, ne s’appliquent que « lorsque les parties n’ont pas fait de stipulations contraires » (art. 940 C.p.c.). Le titre II, quant √† lui, introduit un r√©gime de r√®gles applicables √† la reconnaissance et √† l’ex√©cution des sentences arbitrales rendues hors du Qu√©bec.

44 Si la Loi 91 est la r√©ponse du l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois √† l’adh√©sion du Canada √† la Convention de New York et √† l’adoption de la Loi type par la CNUDCI, elle n’est pas une copie conforme de ces deux instruments. Comme le souligne le ministre de la Justice, la Loi 91 « s’inspire » de la Loi type et « me[t] en Ňďuvre » la Convention de New York : Journal des d√©bats, 30 octobre 1986, p. 3672. C’est pourquoi avant de proc√©der √† l’interpr√©tation des dispositions de la Loi 91, il convient de rappeler comment le droit interne qu√©b√©cois interagit avec le droit international public.

45 L’analyse de l’interaction de la Convention de New York et de la Loi 91 a √©t√© faite par la Cour dans GreCon Dimter inc. c. J.R. Normand inc., [2005] 2 R.C.S. 401, 2005 CSC 46, par. 39 et suiv. Apr√®s avoir r√©it√©r√© l’existence reconnue de la pr√©somption de conformit√© au droit international, la Cour souligne que la Loi 91 « int√®gre les principes de la Convention de New York » et conclut que celle-ci constitue une source formelle d’interpr√©tation des dispositions du droit qu√©b√©cois visant l’ex√©cution des conventions d’arbitrage : par. 41. C’est d’ailleurs ce que confirme l’art. 948, al. 2 C.p.c., lequel pr√©cise que le titre II sur la reconnaissance et l’ex√©cution des sentences arbitrales rendues hors du Qu√©bec (art. 948 √† 951.2 C.p.c.), « s’interpr√®te en tenant compte, s’il y a lieu, de la Convention » de New York.

46 La situation est diff√©rente pour ce qui est de la Loi type. En effet, contrairement au droit international conventionnel, il s’agit d’un texte non contraignant que l’Assembl√©e g√©n√©rale des Nations Unies recommande aux √Čtats de prendre en consid√©ration. Il s’ensuit que le Canada n’a jamais eu √† s’engager envers la communaut√© internationale √† mettre en Ňďuvre la Loi type de la m√™me fa√ßon qu’il l’a fait pour la Convention de New York. N√©anmoins, le texte de l’art. 940.6 C.p.c. conf√®re √† la Loi type une grande valeur interpr√©tative en cas d’arbitrage international :

940.6 Dans le cas d’un arbitrage mettant en cause des int√©r√™ts du commerce extra-provincial ou international, le pr√©sent titre s’interpr√®te, s’il y a lieu, en tenant compte :

1° de la Loi type sur l’arbitrage commercial international adopt√©e le 21 juin 1985 par la Commission des Nations Unies pour le droit commercial international;

2° du Rapport de la Commission des Nations Unies pour le droit commercial international sur les travaux de sa dix huiti√®me session tenue √† Vienne du 3 au 21 juin 1985;

3° du Commentaire analytique du projet de texte d’une loi type sur l’arbitrage commercial international figurant au rapport du Secr√©taire g√©n√©ral pr√©sent√© √† la dix huiti√®me session de la Commission des Nations Unies pour le droit commercial international.

47 Bref, pour reprendre les termes du professeur Brierley, la Loi 91 a eu pour effet d’ouvrir le droit qu√©b√©cois de l’arbitrage √† la « pens√©e internationale » dans ce domaine; cette pens√©e internationale « est maintenant une source officielle du droit positif qu√©b√©cois » : J. E. C. Brierley, « Une loi nouvelle pour le Qu√©bec en mati√®re d’arbitrage » (1987), 47 R. du B. 259, p. 265 et 270-271.

4.3.3 Le statut de l’arbitrage en droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois

48 La Loi 91 √©tablit le r√©gime juridique applicable √† l’arbitrage. Tous les arbitrages ne sont pas r√©gis par les m√™mes r√®gles. Premi√®rement, le titre premier — qui concerne la tenue de l’arbitrage — ne s’applique que lorsque les parties n’ont pas fait de stipulations qui s’en √©carteraient. De plus, il faut que les faits dictent l’application du Code de proc√©dure civile, soit parce que les parties √©trang√®res l’ont choisi conform√©ment √† une disposition les autorisant √† le faire dans une loi qui autrement r√©girait cet arbitrage, soit parce qu’il s’agit d’un arbitrage dont les faits dictent l’application du droit qu√©b√©cois. Deuxi√®mement, on trouve au titre II du livre VII du Code de proc√©dure civile des dispositions particuli√®res r√©gissant la reconnaissance et l’ex√©cution des sentences arbitrales prononc√©es hors du Qu√©bec. Troisi√®mement, l’art. 940.6 C.p.c. pr√©cise que l’interpr√©tation du titre premier traitant de la tenue de l’arbitrage se fait en tenant compte, s’il y a lieu, de la Loi type et de certains documents y aff√©rents « [d]ans le cas d’un arbitrage mettant en cause des int√©r√™ts du commerce extra-provincial ou international ». Comme le signale le professeur Marquis, cette expression a une « consonance inconnue en droit qu√©b√©cois » : L. Marquis, « Le droit fran√ßais et le droit qu√©b√©cois de l’arbitrage conventionnel », dans H. P. Glenn, dir., Droit qu√©b√©cois et droit fran√ßais : communaut√©, autonomie, concordance (1993), 447, p. 483. En fait, l’expression en question est directement tir√©e du Code de proc√©dure civile fran√ßais :

1492. Est international l’arbitrage qui met en cause des int√©r√™ts du commerce international.

Puisque les m√™mes termes sont utilis√©s, les auteurs qu√©b√©cois s’accordent pour dire que l’art. 940.6 C.p.c. a import√© du droit fran√ßais la notion d’arbitrage international : S. Guillemard, Le droit international priv√© face au contrat de vente cyberspatial (2006), p. 73-74; S. Thuilleaux, L’arbitrage commercial au Qu√©bec : Droit interne — Droit international priv√© (1991), p. 129; L. Marquis, « La notion d’arbitrage commercial international en droit qu√©b√©cois » (1991-1992), 37 R.D. McGill 448, p. 465 et 469.

49 Le crit√®re de l’int√©r√™t commercial international est diff√©rent des crit√®res de rattachement tels le lieu de r√©sidence des parties ou le lieu d’ex√©cution des obligations. Ainsi, une situation juridique contractuelle peut pr√©senter des √©l√©ments d’extran√©it√© sans mettre en cause des int√©r√™ts du commerce extra-provincial ou international; dans un tel cas, l’arbitrage qui en r√©sultera ne sera pas consid√©r√© comme un arbitrage international, mais il sera tout de m√™me r√©gi par les r√®gles du droit international priv√©. Comme il n’est pas question, en l’esp√®ce, d’un arbitrage commercial international, cette pr√©cision ne vise qu’√† mettre en relief le fait que le crit√®re de l’art. 940.6 C.p.c. est clairement distinct de l’exigence d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. Lorsque le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois a voulu que des r√®gles distinctes s’appliquent, il l’a pr√©cis√©.

50 Les r√®gles sur la tenue de l’arbitrage figurant dans le titre I du livre VII du Code de proc√©dure civile s’appliquent, dans la mesure qui y est pr√©vue, √† tous les arbitrages assujettis au droit qu√©b√©cois. Il est loisible aux parties d’attribuer √† l’arbitrage des rattachements √©trangers. Un tel arbitrage sera alors susceptible de faire jouer les r√®gles du droit international priv√©. Le seul fait de stipuler une clause d’arbitrage ne constitue cependant pas en lui-m√™me un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© justifiant l’application des r√®gles du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois. Cette constatation ne fait l’objet d’aucun d√©bat dans la doctrine :

Il est clair que, si on juge que l’arbitrage est purement interne au Qu√©bec, on va le soumettre √† la loi du Qu√©bec. Il √©chappera au droit international priv√©. On appliquera le Code de proc√©dure civile (r√®gles sur l’arbitrage) du Qu√©bec.
(J. B√©guin, L’arbitrage commercial international (1987), p. 67)

Voir aussi, au même effet, en droit comparé, E. Gaillard et J. Savage, Fouchard, Gaillard, Goldman on International Commercial Arbitration (1999), p. 47.

51 La neutralit√© de l’arbitrage comme institution est en fait l’une des caract√©ristiques fondamentales de ce mode amiable de r√®glement des conflits. Contrairement √† l’extran√©it√©, qui signale la possibilit√© d’un rattachement avec un √Čtat √©tranger, l’arbitrage est une institution sans for et sans assise g√©ographique : Guillemard, p. 77; Thuilleaux, p. 145. Un arbitrage ne fait partie d’aucune structure judiciaire √©tatique : Desputeaux, par. 41. Il n’a ni all√©geance ni rattachement √† un √Čtat quelconque : M. Lehmann, « A Plea for a Transnational Approach to Arbitrability in Arbitral Practice » (2003-2004), 42Colum. J. Transnat’l L. 753, p. 755. Bref, l’arbitrage est une cr√©ature dont l’existence repose sur la volont√© exclusive des parties : Laurentienne-vie, compagnie d’assurance inc. c. Empire, compagnie d’assurance-vie, [2000] R.J.Q. 1708 (C.A.), par. 13 et 16.

52 Si le choix de l’arbitrage comme mode de r√®glement des conflits √©tait constitutif d’extran√©it√©, cela reviendrait √† dire que l’arbitrage constitue, par lui-m√™me, un lien de rattachement avec un territoire donn√©, ce qui est tout √† fait contradictoire avec l’essence m√™me de l’institution de l’arbitrage, c’est-√†-dire la neutralit√©. Cette institution est neutre sur le plan territorial; elle ne comporte aucun √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. D’ailleurs, les parties √† une convention d’arbitrage sont libres, sous r√©serve des dispositions imp√©ratives qui les lient, de choisir le lieu, la forme et les modalit√©s qui leur conviennent. Elles peuvent choisir l’espace virtuel et fixer leurs propres r√®gles. Elles pouvaient, en l’esp√®ce, se reporter au Code de proc√©dure civile, s’inspirer d’un guide d’arbitrage qu√©b√©cois ou am√©ricain ou choisir les r√®gles √©tablies par une organisation reconnue comme la Chambre de Commerce internationale, le Centre canadien d’arbitrage commercial ou le NAF. Dans aucun de ces cas la proc√©dure choisie n’a d’incidence sur l’institution de l’arbitrage. Les r√®gles deviennent celles des parties, peu importe leur origine.

53 Je ne peux donc concevoir que le simple fait pour les parties de choisir la juridiction arbitrale soit constitutif d’extran√©it√©. Cette interpr√©tation viderait de son sens la notion d’extran√©it√©. Une situation d’arbitrage qui ne comporte aucun √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© au sens v√©ritable du mot est un arbitrage interne. Seule une situation d’arbitrage qui comporte un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, par exemple le fait que le d√©fendeur dans une r√©clamation personnelle soit domicili√© √† l’√©tranger, fera jouer les r√®gles sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises.

54 Il s’agit maintenant de d√©terminer si les faits de la pr√©sente affaire comportent, eux, un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©.

4.4 Recherche de l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© dans les faits de l’esp√®ce

55 La juge de premi√®re instance a vu un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© dans le fait que « [l]e NAF est situ√© aux √Čtats-Unis » (par. 32). La Cour d’appel n’a pas retenu cette conclusion, qui n’est plus avanc√©e par l’Union. Comme d’autres organisations telles que la Chambre de commerce internationale ou le Centre canadien d’arbitrage commercial, le NAF offre des services d’arbitrage. Le lieu o√Ļ sont prises les d√©cisions concernant les services d’arbitrage ou celui o√Ļ travaillent les employ√©s de ces organisations n’ont aucune incidence sur les litiges dans lesquels les r√®gles de ces derni√®res sont utilis√©es.

56 Le lieu du si√®ge du NAF ne constitue donc pas un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© pertinent pour l’application du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois. De plus, la concession de Dell suivant laquelle l’arbitrage aura lieu au Qu√©bec devrait clore le d√©bat sur le lieu de l’arbitrage.

57 Une autre source potentielle d’extran√©it√© se trouve dans le Code de proc√©dure du NAF (National Arbitration Forum Code of Procedure). Les r√®gles 5O et 48B du Code du NAF pr√©voient que, sauf convention contraire des parties, l’arbitrage et la proc√©dure arbitrale sont r√©gis par la Federal Arbitration Act des √Čtats-Unis. Au Qu√©bec, la d√©signation du droit applicable est r√©gie par le titre deuxi√®me du livre dixi√®me du Code civil du Qu√©bec, qui traite des conflits de lois. La d√©signation du droit applicable faite par les parties en vertu de ce titre ne constitue pas un facteur d’extran√©it√© normalement reconnu dans le titre suivant sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises. De toute fa√ßon, comme l’art. 3111 C.c.Q., dont j’ai trait√© plus haut, porte sur la d√©signation du droit applicable √† un acte juridique ne comportant aucun √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, c’est que la d√©signation elle-m√™me n’emporte pas une telle extran√©it√©.

58 L’Union soul√®ve un dernier √©l√©ment, celui de la langue des proc√©dures. Selon le Code du NAF, l’anglais est la langue utilis√©e dans les proc√©dures de cette organisation, mais les parties peuvent choisir une autre langue, auquel cas le NAF ou l’arbitre pourra ordonner aux parties de fournir les traductions et services d’interpr√©tation requis et d’en assumer les co√Ľts (r√®gles 11D et 35G du Code du NAF).

59 √Ä mon avis, l’argument linguistique ne saurait √™tre retenu. Bien que je convienne que l’utilisation d’une langue avec laquelle le consommateur n’est pas familier puisse causer des difficult√©s, ni la langue fran√ßaise ni la langue anglaise ne peuvent √™tre, au Canada, qualifi√©es de facteur d’extran√©it√©.

60 Mes coll√®gues les juges Bastarache et LeBel sont tout de m√™me d’avis qu’il est logique d’accepter qu’une clause d’arbitrage constitue, en elle-m√™me, un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© faisant jouer les dispositions sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises. Leur interpr√©tation entra√ģne des cons√©quences qui d√©bordent les contrats de consommation. Ainsi, serait √©galement inopposable toutengagement que prendrait un travailleur qu√©b√©cois de porter devant un arbitre un √©ventuel diff√©rend avec son employeur qu√©b√©cois relativement √† son contrat individuel de travail. De plus, serait nulle touteconvention d’arbitrage se rapportant √† un pr√©judice d√©coulant de l’exposition √† des mati√®res premi√®res provenant du Qu√©bec (voir les art. 3151 et 3129 C.c.Q.), m√™me une convention liant un fournisseur qu√©b√©cois et un producteur qu√©b√©cois. Cette interpr√©tation est difficilement acceptable. Elle implique que le codificateur n’aurait pas atteint son objectif d’ordonnancement des r√®gles tant pour ce qui est du livre dixi√®me sur le droit international priv√© que pour ce qui est du chapitre XVIII — De la convention d’arbitrage — du livre cinqui√®me. Ce point est important et d√©borde le strict argument fond√© sur l’extran√©it√©. Je l’examine donc de fa√ßon distincte.

4.5 Ordonnancement des r√®gles sur l’arbitrage

61 Le chapitre sur l’arbitrage fait partie de l’important livre cinqui√®me du Code civil du Qu√©bec, lequel traite des obligations. Ce livre est divis√© en deux titres, le premier porte sur les obligations en g√©n√©ral et le deuxi√®me sur les contrats nomm√©s. Le chapitre XVIII est le dernier du titre sur les contrats nomm√©s. Il incorpore les dispositions de la Loi 91 adopt√©e en 1986 et dont j’ai discut√© plus haut. Il contient une disposition g√©n√©rale, l’art. 2638 C.c.Q., qui reconna√ģt la validit√© et l’opposabilit√© d’une convention d’arbitrage :

2638. La convention d’arbitrage est le contrat par lequel les parties s’engagent √† soumettre un diff√©rend n√© ou √©ventuel √† la d√©cision d’un ou de plusieurs arbitres, √† l’exclusion des tribunaux.

Dans ses Commentaires sur cet article, le ministre de la Justice dit qu’il est de l’essence de la convention d’arbitrage « d’√©carter l’intervention des tribunaux » et qu’« en attribuant une comp√©tence juridictionnelle aux arbitres [on] exclut la comp√©tence habituelle de l’ordre judiciaire » : Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, t. II, p. 1649.

62 Ce chapitre contient aussi une disposition pr√©cisant les cas o√Ļ les parties ne peuvent √©carter la comp√©tence des tribunaux qu√©b√©cois. Voici le texte de cette disposition :

2639. Ne peut √™tre soumis √† l’arbitrage, le diff√©rend portant sur l’√©tat et la capacit√© des personnes, sur les mati√®res familiales ou sur les autres questions qui int√©ressent l’ordre public.

Toutefois, il ne peut √™tre fait obstacle √† la convention d’arbitrage au motif que les r√®gles applicables pour trancher le diff√©rend pr√©sentent un caract√®re d’ordre public.

63 Le codificateur a donc pr√©vu, pour ce qui est des litiges ne comportant pas d’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, des r√®gles sp√©cifiques traitant, d’une part, de l’effet de la convention d’arbitrage et, d’autre part, des cas o√Ļ l’arbitrage n’est pas autoris√© en droit interne. Il s’est donc pench√© sur les mati√®res susceptibles d’arbitrage. Pour les litiges qui ne mettent pas en cause le droit international priv√©, ces mati√®res sont √©num√©r√©es l√† o√Ļ sont regroup√©es les dispositions r√©gissant l’arbitrage. L’article 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q. n’est pas une r√©p√©tition de l’art. 2638 C.c.Q. Il est l’expression de la m√™me r√®gle pour ce qui est des conventions d’arbitrage comportant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. Par ailleurs, donner aux art. 3149 et 3151 C.c.Q. une port√©e g√©n√©rale oblige √† inf√©rer que le codificateur a √©t√© incoh√©rent en n’incluant pas, au chapitre sur l’arbitrage, les exclusions concernant les contrats de consommation, les contrats de travail et les r√©clamations li√©es √† l’exposition aux mati√®res premi√®res.

64 Consid√©rer que l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. se limite au droit international priv√© est par ailleurs coh√©rent avec l’objectif poursuivi par le l√©gislateur. En effet, cette disposition fait partie des nouvelles mesures que le l√©gislateur a ins√©r√©es dans le titre sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec afin de prot√©ger certains groupes plus vuln√©rables : Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, t. II, p. 2011. L’article 3149 C.c.Q. mentionne deux de ces groupes, c’est-√†-dire les consommateurs et les travailleurs qu√©b√©cois, qui ne peuvent renoncer √† la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises. Je suis d’accord avec les propos suivants, formul√©s par le juge Beauregard de la Cour d’appel du Qu√©bec dans l’affaire Dominion Bridge relativement √† l’objectif g√©n√©ral du l√©gislateur √† l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. :

Il me para√ģt manifeste que le l√©gislateur a voulu √©viter qu’un employ√© soit oblig√© d’aller √† l’√©tranger pour faire valoir ses droits aux termes d’un contrat d’emploi. [p. 325]

La raison d’√™tre de l’inopposabilit√© de l’arbitrage, dans le titre sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises, est donc clairement la protection du consommateur dans une situation comportant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©.

65 En √©dictant l’art. 3149 C.c.Q., le l√©gislateur ne peut avoir voulu emprunter une voie obscure, requ√©rant une lecture d√©contextualis√©e du titre sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises. L’interpr√©tation de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. doit permettre la r√©alisation de l’objectif de protection du l√©gislateur et cette interpr√©tation doit √™tre harmonis√©e non seulement avec le titre traitant de la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises mais aussi avec tout le livre sur le droit international priv√© et le chapitre XVIII sur l’arbitrage (titre deuxi√®me du livre cinqui√®me) du C.c.Q., ainsi qu’avec le livre VII sur l’arbitrage du Code de proc√©dure civile. Cet exercice d√©montre la coh√©rence interne de ces r√®gles, qui fonctionnent en harmonie les unes avec les autres et sans redondance. Les dispositions g√©n√©rales sur l’arbitrage sont regroup√©es ensemble tant dans les livres, titres et chapitres du Code civil du Qu√©bec et du Code de proc√©dure civile, √† l’int√©rieur desquels des exceptions sont pr√©cis√©es pour les mati√®res particuli√®res. Il n’est pas souhaitable de faire √©clater la coh√©rence entre les r√©gimes sur l’arbitrage et sur la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises en incorporant dans le champ d’application des r√®gles sur la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises tous les litiges portant sur la comp√©tence arbitrale sans √©gard √† l’existence d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©.

4.6 Conclusion sur l’application de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q.

66 Les juristes qui ont travaill√© √† la r√©forme du Code civil, ainsi que le ministre de la Justice en poste lors de l’adoption du Code civil du Qu√©bec et de nombreux auteurs canadiens et √©trangers reconnaissent que l’extran√©it√© est une condition pr√©alable √† l’application des r√®gles en mati√®re de comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises. L’ordonnancement effectu√© lors d’une codification et la r√®gle selon laquelle une disposition doit √™tre interpr√©t√©e en harmonie avec son contexte commandent une interpr√©tation de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. qui le limite aux cas pr√©sentant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©.

67 Je me pencherai maintenant sur les autres questions en litige. Elles concernent l’intensit√© de l’examen de la clause d’arbitrage par la Cour sup√©rieure ainsi que la validit√© et l’applicabilit√© de la clause d’arbitrage.

5. L’intensit√© de l’examen de la clause d’arbitrage par la Cour sup√©rieure lors de la demande de renvoi

68 La pr√©sente partie a pour objectif de d√©terminer qui de l’arbitre ou du tribunal judiciaire devrait entendre, en premier, les arguments soulev√©s par les parties concernant la validit√© ou l’applicabilit√© d’une convention d’arbitrage. J’examinerai donc les param√®tres √† l’int√©rieur desquels l’intervention judiciaire peut √™tre exerc√©e en pr√©sence d’une convention d’arbitrage.

5.1 La comp√©tence de l’arbitre de statuer sur sa propre comp√©tence en droit international

69 Deux courants s’opposent dans le d√©bat sur l’intensit√© de l’examen par le tribunal judiciaire de la comp√©tence de l’arbitre aux termes d’une convention d’arbitrage. L’un requiert que ce soit le tribunal judiciaire qui statue en premier sur la comp√©tence de l’arbitre; il est fond√© sur la volont√© d’√©viter le d√©doublement des proc√©dures. Comme le tribunal judiciaire conserve le pouvoir de r√©viser la d√©cision de l’arbitre concernant sa propre comp√©tence, pourquoi alors laisser ce dernier se prononcer en premier sur cette question? Selon ce point de vue, il est pr√©f√©rable de laisser le tribunal judiciaire trancher imm√©diatement toute contestation concernant la comp√©tence de l’arbitre. Ce premier courant favorise donc une approche judiciaire interventionniste √† l’√©gard des questions touchant √† la comp√©tence des arbitres.

70 L’autre courant donne pr√©s√©ance au processus arbitral. Il tend √† pr√©venir les tactiques dilatoires. Il est associ√© au principe commun√©ment appel√© « comp√©tence-comp√©tence ». Il favorise l’exercice par l’arbitre de son pouvoir de se prononcer en premier lieu sur sa propre comp√©tence (Gaillard et Savage, p. 401).

71 La Convention de New York ne dicte pas de fa√ßon expresse le choix de l’un ou l’autre des courants. L’article II(3) est r√©dig√© ainsi :

Le tribunal d’un Etat contractant, saisi d’un litige sur une question au sujet de laquelle les parties ont conclu une convention au sens du pr√©sent article, renverra les parties √† l’arbitrage, √† la demande de l’une d’elles, √† moins qu’il ne constate que ladite convention est caduque, inop√©rante ou non susceptible d’√™tre appliqu√©e.

72 Certains auteurs consid√®rent que cette disposition signifie que le renvoi est la r√®gle g√©n√©rale : Gaillard et Savage, p. 402-404; F. Bachand, L’intervention du juge canadien avant et durant un arbitrage commercial international (2005), p. 178-179 et 183. Son texte signalerait que le tribunal ne doit statuer sur la comp√©tence de l’arbitre que lorsque la clause est clairement nulle, inop√©rante ou inapplicable.

73 En effet, que le Tribunal puisse, comme le pr√©voit l’art. II(3) de la Convention de New York, se prononcer sur la caducit√©, le caract√®re inop√©rant ou l’inapplicabilit√© de la clause, ne signifie cependant pas qu’il ait l’obligation de se prononcer avant que l’arbitre ne le fasse.

74 La Loi type, qui, je l’ai dit plus t√īt, a √©t√© r√©dig√©e en conformit√© avec la Convention de New York est plus claire. D’abord, l’art. 8(1) de la Loi type reprend presque textuellement le texte de l’art. II(3) de la Convention de New York. De plus, l’art. 16 de la Loi type admet express√©ment le principe de comp√©tence-comp√©tence. Voici le texte de cet article :

Article 16. Compétence du tribunal arbitral pour statuer sur sa propre compétence

1. Le tribunal arbitral peut statuer sur sa propre comp√©tence, y compris sur toute exception relative √† l’existence ou √† la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage. A cette fin, une clause compromissoire faisant partie d’un contrat est consid√©r√©e comme une convention distincte des autres clauses du contrat. La constatation de nullit√© du contrat par le tribunal arbitral n’entra√ģne pas de plein droit la nullit√© de la clause compromissoire.

2. L’exception d’incomp√©tence du tribunal arbitral peut √™tre soulev√©e au plus tard lors du d√©p√īt des conclusions en d√©fense. Le fait pour une partie d’avoir d√©sign√© un arbitre ou d’avoir particip√© √† sa d√©signation ne la prive pas du droit de soulever cette exception. L’exception prise de ce que la question litigieuse exc√©derait les pouvoirs du tribunal arbitral est soulev√©e d√®s que la question all√©gu√©e comme exc√©dant ses pouvoirs est soulev√©e pendant la proc√©dure arbitrale. Le tribunal arbitral peut, dans l’un ou l’autre cas, admettre une exception soulev√©e apr√®s le d√©lai pr√©vu, s’il estime que le retard est d√Ľ √† une cause valable.

3. Le tribunal arbitral peut statuer sur l’exception vis√©e au paragraphe 2 du pr√©sent article soit en la traitant comme une question pr√©alable, soit dans sa sentence sur le fond. Si le tribunal arbitral d√©termine, √† titre de question pr√©alable, qu’il est comp√©tent, l’une ou l’autre partie peut, dans un d√©lai de trente jours apr√®s avoir √©t√© avis√©e de cette d√©cision, demander au tribunal vis√© √† l’article 6 de rendre une d√©cision sur ce point, laquelle ne sera pas susceptible de recours; en attendant qu’il soit statu√© sur cette demande, le tribunal arbitral est libre de poursuivre la proc√©dure arbitrale et de rendre une sentence.

75 Certains auteurs soutiennent que le principe de comp√©tence-comp√©tence a pour effet d’obliger le tribunal judiciaire √† s’en tenir √† une analyse sommaire de la demande et de renvoyer les parties √† l’arbitrage, sauf si la convention d’arbitrage est manifestement entach√©e d’un vice la rendant invalide ou inapplicable : F. Bachand, « Does Article 8 of the Model Law Call for Full or Prima Facie Review of the Arbitral Tribunal’s Jurisdiction? ». Le professeur Bachand soutient que cette interpr√©tation est confirm√©e par l’historique l√©gislatif de la Loi type. Cette approche a aussi √©t√© adopt√©e par plusieurs pays, dont la France, qui l’a incorpor√©e formellement √† l’art. 1458 de son Code de proc√©dure civile. Par interpr√©tation judiciaire, le crit√®re de l’analyse sommaire a aussi √©t√© retenu en Suisse : arr√™t de la 1re Cour civile du 29 avril 1996 dans la cause Fondation M. c. Banque X., BGE 122 III 139 (1996), cit√©e par Gaillard et Savage, p. 409.

76 Le crit√®re de nullit√© manifeste est plut√īt strict :

La nullit√© de la convention d’arbitrage sera manifeste lorsqu’elle sera incontestable [. . .] D√®s l’instant qu’il y a discussion s√©rieuse sur la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage, seul l’arbitre peut valablement op√©rer la v√©rification [. . .] La clause d’arbitrage, dont la validit√© est apparente, ne sera jamais consid√©r√©e comme manifestement nulle.

(√Č. Loquin, « Comp√©tence arbitrale », Juris-classeur Proc√©dure civile, fasc. 1034 (1994), no 105)

77 Malgr√© l’absence de consensus au sein de la communaut√© internationale, le crit√®re de l’analyse sommaire est de plus en plus reconnu et jouit de l’appui de nombreux auteurs : Gaillard et Savage, p. 407-413; Bachand, « Does Article 8 of the Model Law Call for Full or Prima Facie Review of the Arbitral Tribunal’s Jurisdiction? ». Ce crit√®re est la marque d’une approche respectueuse √† l’endroit de la comp√©tence de l’arbitre.

78 Apr√®s ce survol du droit international, il convient d’examiner la position du droit qu√©b√©cois sur la question.

5.2 Le crit√®re qu√©b√©cois d’intervention judiciaire en pr√©sence d’une convention d’arbitrage

79 Le cadre juridique du renvoi √† l’arbitrage est d√©crit au Code de proc√©dure civile, dont voici les dispositions pertinentes :

940.1 Tant que la cause n’est pas inscrite, un tribunal, saisi d’un litige sur une question au sujet de laquelle les parties ont conclu une convention d’arbitrage, renvoie les parties √† l’arbitrage, √† la demande de l’une d’elles, √† moins qu’il ne constate la nullit√© de la convention.

La proc√©dure arbitrale peut n√©anmoins √™tre engag√©e ou poursuivie et une sentence peut √™tre rendue tant que le tribunal n’a pas statu√©.
(. . .)

943. Les arbitres peuvent statuer sur leur propre compétence.

943.1 Si les arbitres se déclarent compétents pendant la procédure arbitrale, une partie peut, dans les 30 jours après en avoir été avisée, demander au tribunal de se prononcer à ce sujet.

Tant que le tribunal n’a pas statu√©, les arbitres peuvent poursuivre la proc√©dure arbitrale et rendre leur sentence.

943.2 La d√©cision du tribunal qui reconna√ģt, pendant la proc√©dure arbitrale, la comp√©tence des arbitres est finale et sans appel.

80 On peut, d’embl√©e, constater que l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. int√®gre l’essence de l’art. II(3) de la Convention de New York et de son pendant dans la Loi type, l’art. 8. Par ailleurs, l’art. 943 C.p.c. reconna√ģt √† l’arbitre le pouvoir de se prononcer sur sa propre comp√©tence. Cet article signale clairement l’acceptation du principe de comp√©tence-comp√©tence incorpor√© √† l’art. 16 de la Loi type.

81 L’examen de la jurisprudence en mati√®re d’arbitrage nous am√®ne √† constater que les tribunaux qu√©b√©cois ont souvent accept√© ou refus√© de donner effet aux clauses d’arbitrage sans s’interroger sur l’intensit√© de l’examen auquel ils devaient se livrer : C.C.I.C. Consultech International c. Silverman, [1991] R.D.J. 500 (C.A.); Banque Nationale du Canada c. Premdev inc., [1997] A.Q. no 689 (QL) (C.A.); Acier Leroux inc. c. Tremblay, [2004] R.J.Q. 839 (C.A.); Robertson Building Systems Ltd. c. Constructions de la Source inc., [2006] J.Q. no 3118 (QL), 2006 QCCA 461; Compagnie nationale alg√©rienne de navigation c. Pegasus Lines Ltd. S.A., [1994] A.Q. no 329 (QL) (C.A.). On remarque cependant que lorsque l’analyse de la clause requiert l’examen d’une preuve factuelle contradictoire, les tribunaux qu√©b√©cois peuvent se montrer r√©ticents √† proc√©der √† un examen au fond. Ainsi, dans Kingsway Financial Services Inc. c. 118997 Canada inc., [1999] J.Q. no 5922 (QL) (C.A.), l’acheteur a poursuivi son vendeur pour erreur provoqu√©e par le dol. Cette question exigeait du tribunal saisi qu’il d√©cide si le vendeur avait fait de fausses d√©clarations √† l’acheteur. La Cour d’appel s’est content√©e de renvoyer le dossier √† l’arbitrage.

82 Un auteur sugg√®re que les tribunaux qu√©b√©cois font preuve de plus de respect envers la comp√©tence de l’arbitre lorsqu’ils sont simplement saisis d’une contestation fond√©e sur l’applicabilit√© de la clause d’arbitrage, alors que si la question porte sur la validit√© de cette m√™me clause, ils semblent avoir pour r√®gle de trancher cette question de fa√ßon imm√©diate : F. Bachand, L’intervention du juge canadien avant et durant un arbitrage commercial international, p. 190-191. Je reconnais qu’une distinction pourrait √™tre faite entre les cas de validit√© et d’applicabilit√©. Cependant, on ne peut affirmer que cette distinction est uniform√©ment utilis√©e ou identifi√©e par les tribunaux qu√©b√©cois comme crit√®re d’intervention. Je remarque aussi qu’elle n’est pas retenue dans le reste du Canada o√Ļ l’analyse sommaire est √©galement √©tendue aux cas d’applicabilit√© de la clause d’arbitrage : Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. c. Arochem International Ltd. (1992), 66 B.C.L.R. (2d) 113 (C.A.); Dalimpex Ltd. c. Janicki(2003), 228 D.L.R. (4th) 179 (C.A. Ont.). C’est pourquoi j’estime n√©cessaire de pousser la recherche au del√† de cette distinction.

83 L’article 940.1 C.p.c. ne mentionne que les cas de nullit√© de la convention d’arbitrage. Cependant, comme cette disposition fait partie de la mise en Ňďuvre de la Convention de New York (dont les termes utilis√©s √† l’art. II(3) sont « caduque, inop√©rante ou non susceptible d’√™tre appliqu√©e »), je ne crois pas qu’une interpr√©tation litt√©rale soit indiqu√©e. Il est possible, tout en incorporant les donn√©es empiriques qui ressortent de la jurisprudence qu√©b√©coise, de formuler un crit√®re d’examen d’une demande de renvoi √† l’arbitrage qui soit fid√®le √† l’art. 943 C.p.c. et au crit√®re de l’analyse sommaire de plus en plus retenu √† l’√©chelle internationale.

84 Tout d’abord, il convient de poser la r√®gle g√©n√©rale que, lorsqu’il existe une clause d’arbitrage, toute contestation de la comp√©tence de l’arbitre doit d’abord √™tre tranch√©e par ce dernier. Le tribunal ne devrait d√©roger √† la r√®gle du renvoi syst√©matique √† l’arbitrage que dans les cas o√Ļ la contestation de la comp√©tence arbitrale repose exclusivement sur une question de droit. Cette d√©rogation se justifie par l’expertise des tribunaux sur ces questions, par le fait que le tribunal judiciaire est le premier forum auquel les parties s’adressent lorsqu’elles demandent le renvoi et par la r√®gle voulant que la d√©cision de l’arbitre sur sa comp√©tence puisse faire l’objet d’une r√©vision compl√®te par le tribunal judiciaire. De cette fa√ßon, l’argument de droit relatif √† la comp√©tence de l’arbitre sera tranch√© une fois pour toutes, √©vitant aux parties le d√©doublement d’un d√©bat strictement juridique. De plus, le risque de manipulation de la proc√©dure en vue de cr√©er de l’obstruction est amenuis√© du fait que la d√©cision du tribunal quant √† la comp√©tence arbitrale ne doit pas mettre en cause les faits donnant lieu √† l’application de la clause d’arbitrage.

85 Si la contestation requiert l’administration et l’examen d’une preuve factuelle, le tribunal devra normalement renvoyer l’affaire √† l’arbitre qui, en ce domaine, dispose des m√™mes ressources et de la m√™me expertise que les tribunaux judiciaires. Pour les questions mixtes de droit et de fait, le tribunal saisi de la demande de renvoi devra favoriser le renvoi, sauf si les questions de fait n’impliquent qu’un examen superficiel de la preuve documentaire au dossier.

86 Avant de d√©roger √† la r√®gle g√©n√©rale du renvoi, le tribunal doit √™tre convaincu que la contestation de la comp√©tence arbitrale n’est pas une tactique dilatoire et ne pr√©judiciera pas ind√Ľment le d√©roulement de l’arbitrage. Cette derni√®re exigence signifie que, m√™me si le tribunal est en pr√©sence d’une des situations d’exception, il peut d√©cider qu’il est dans l’int√©r√™t du processus arbitral de laisser l’arbitre se prononcer en premier lieu sur sa propre comp√©tence.

87 Ainsi, la r√®gle g√©n√©rale du crit√®re qu√©b√©cois est conforme au principe de comp√©tence-comp√©tence pr√©vu √† l’art. 16 de la Loi type et incorpor√© √† l’art. 943 C.p.c. Quant √† la d√©rogation permettant aux tribunaux de trancher de fa√ßon initiale les questions de droit relatives √† la comp√©tence de l’arbitre, il s’agit d’un pouvoir pr√©vu √† l’art. 940.1 C.p.c., qui reconna√ģt justement aux tribunaux le pouvoir de constater eux-m√™mes la nullit√© de la convention au lieu de renvoyer cette question √† l’arbitrage.

88 En l’esp√®ce, les parties ont soulev√© des questions de droit portant sur l’application des dispositions du droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois et le caract√®re d’ordre public du recours collectif. Plusieurs autres moyens requ√©raient cependant une analyse des faits pour d√©terminer l’application √† l’esp√®ce des r√®gles de droit. Il en va ainsi de la recherche de l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© dans les faits de l’affaire. De m√™me le caract√®re externe de la clause d’arbitrage requiert non seulement l’interpr√©tation du droit mais aussi l’examen de la preuve documentaire et testimoniale pr√©sent√©e par les parties. En vertu du crit√®re d√©crit ci-dessus, l’affaire aurait d√Ľ √™tre renvoy√©e √† l’arbitrage.

89 Vu l’√©tat du dossier, il serait contreproductif pour notre Cour de renvoyer le dossier √† l’arbitrage et d’exposer ainsi les parties √† une nouvelle s√©rie de proc√©dures. Il est donc souhaitable de traiter ici de toutes les questions. J’ai d√©j√† discut√© de l’application de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. et de la recherche du facteur d’extran√©it√©. J’examine maintenant la question de la clause externe.

6. Le caract√®re externe de la clause d’arbitrage

90 En 1994, le l√©gislateur a introduit dans le droit des obligations contractuelles les art. 1435 √† 1437 C.c.Q., qui sont des r√®gles particuli√®res concernant la validit√© de certaines clauses contenues typiquement dans des contrats d’adh√©sion ou de consommation. Bien que ces r√®gles aient toutes pour objet g√©n√©ral la protection des parties contractantes plus faibles et vuln√©rables, chacune d’entre elles sanctionne diff√©rentes sortes de clauses (externes, illisibles, incompr√©hensibles et abusives) et s’attaque en cons√©quence √† diff√©rents types d’abus. Par exemple, alors que la notion de clause externe (art. 1435 C.c.Q.) vise traditionnellement les clauses contractuelles qui sont physiquement s√©par√©es du document principal, la notion de clause illisible (art. 1436 C.c.Q.) vise, quant √† elle, les clauses qui ne sont pas s√©par√©es du document principal mais dont la pr√©sentation physique les rend illisibles pour une personne raisonnable. C’est ainsi que l’on qualifie d’illisible la clause qui est — noy√©e parmi un grand nombre d’autres clauses — en raison de l’endroit o√Ļ elle est situ√©e dans le contrat : D. Lluelles et B. Moore, Droit des obligations (2006), p. 897; B. Lefebvre, « Le contrat d’adh√©sion » (2003), 105 R. du N. 439, p. 479. Par clause incompr√©hensible (art. 1436 C.c.Q.), on entend une clause dont la formulation est d√©fectueuse, ce qui rend son contenu inintelligible ou trop ambigu.

91 En l’esp√®ce, l’Union pr√©tend qu’en vertu de l’art. 1435 C.c.Q. la clause d’arbitrage est nulle, parce qu’il s’agit d’une clause externe dont la connaissance par M. Dumoulin n’a pas √©t√© prouv√©e. Cet article est r√©dig√© ainsi :

1435. La clause externe à laquelle renvoie le contrat lie les parties.

Toutefois, dans un contrat de consommation ou d’adh√©sion, cette clause est nulle si, au moment de la formation du contrat, elle n’a pas √©t√© express√©ment port√©e √† la connaissance du consommateur ou de la partie qui y adh√®re, √† moins que l’autre partie ne prouve que le consommateur ou l’adh√©rent en avait par ailleurs connaissance.

92 Cette disposition reconna√ģt d’abord la validit√© d’une clause externe √† laquelle un contrat renvoie. Elle vise cependant √† rem√©dier aux abus d√©coulant de l’insertion, par r√©f√©rence, de stipulations inconnues d’une des parties : Office de r√©vision du Code civil, vol. II, t. 2, p. 612; Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, t. I, p. 870-871. La partie qui veut prendre avantage d’une clause externe √† un contrat de consommation ou d’adh√©sion doit prouver qu’elle a √©t√© express√©ment port√©e √† la connaissance du consommateur ou de l’adh√©rent, ou que ceux-ci en avaient par ailleurs connaissance.

93 Faute de d√©finition l√©gislative, la doctrine s’est charg√©e de d√©finir la notion de clause externe. Il s’agit d’une stipulation contractuelle « figurant dans un document distinct de la convention ou de l’instrumentum mais qui, selon une clause de cette convention, est r√©put√©e en faire partie int√©grante » : Baudouin et Jobin : Les obligations (6e √©d. 2005), p. 267. La clause est externe si elle est physiquement s√©par√©e du contrat : Lluelles et Moore, p. 748. Une clause se trouvant √† l’endos du contrat ou dans une annexe √† la fin de celui-ci n’est pas externe, parce qu’elle fait partie int√©grante du contrat. Elle n’est pas vis√©e par l’art. 1435 C.c.Q.

94 La pr√©sente affaire est la premi√®re dans laquelle la Cour d’appel du Qu√©bec a eu √† se demander dans quelle mesure une clause contractuelle accessible au moyen d’un hyperlien figurant dans un contrat conclu par Internet peut constituer une clause externe. Jusqu’√† maintenant, les contestations concernant le caract√®re externe des stipulations contractuelles visaient des documents sur support papier.

95 Certains aspects des documents informatiques sont r√©gis par la loi. En effet, devant le nombre croissant d’actes juridiques conclus par Internet, le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois est intervenu et a √©nonc√© des r√®gles relatives √† ce nouvel environnement. Ainsi, la Loi concernant le cadre juridique des technologies de l’information, L.R.Q., ch. C-1.1, pr√©voit qu’un document a la m√™me valeur juridique, qu’il soit sur support papier ou technologique (art. 5). Un contrat peut donc √™tre conclu aussi bien en utilisant un support √©lectronique qu’un support papier, par exemple en remplissant un formulaire sur une page Internet : V. Gautrais, Afin d’y voir clair : Guide relatif √† la gestion des documents technologiques (2005), p. 23.

96 Malgr√© les efforts d’harmonisation par voie l√©gislative, l’application de certaines r√®gles de droit dans le contexte de l’Internet ne se fait pas toujours sans difficult√©. C’est notamment le cas des clauses externes pour lesquelles le crit√®re traditionnel de s√©paration physique ne peut √™tre transpos√© sans nuance dans le contexte du commerce √©lectronique.

97 Une page Internet peut comporter une multitude de liens, chacun conduisant √† son tour √† une nouvelle page Internet susceptible d’en comporter elle aussi une multitude, et ainsi de suite. √Ä l’√©vidence, l’on ne saurait pr√©tendre que toutes ces diff√©rentes pages reli√©es entre elles constituent un seul document, voire que l’ensemble du Web d√©filant devant l’√©cran de l’internaute n’est qu’un seul et m√™me document. Par ailleurs, il est difficile d’admettre qu’une seule commande de la part de l’internaute suffise pour conclure √† l’application de la disposition r√©gissant les clauses externes. Une telle interpr√©tation serait d√©tach√©e de la r√©alit√© de l’environnement Internet, o√Ļ l’on ne fait pas de distinction concr√®te entre le d√©roulement du document et l’utilisation d’un hyperlien. √Ä l’image des documents papier, certains textes Web comportent plusieurs pages, accessibles seulement au moyen d’un hyperlien, alors que d’autres documents peuvent √™tre d√©roul√©s sur l’√©cran de l’ordinateur. Il n’y a pas de raison de privil√©gier une configuration plut√īt qu’une autre. La d√©termination du caract√®re externe des clauses sur Internet requiert donc de prendre en consid√©ration une autre r√®gle qui, si elle n’est pas explicitement mentionn√©e √† l’art. 1435 C.c.Q., y est n√©anmoins implicite.

98 Ainsi, plusieurs auteurs soulignent que, pour qu’une clause externe √† un contrat puisse lier les parties, elle doit √™tre raisonnablement accessible : Lluelles et Moore, p. 753; Baudouin et Jobin : Les obligations, p. 268. En effet, pour qu’un contractant puisse invoquer la force obligatoire d’une clause contractuelle, il faut que l’autre contractant ait eu une possibilit√© raisonnable d’en prendre connaissance. Pour ce faire, il faut qu’il y ait eu acc√®s. Dans un contrat n√©goci√© faisant √©tat de toutes les conditions contractuelles, le probl√®me d’accessibilit√© ne survient pas parce que toutes les clauses font partie d’un m√™me document. L’accessibilit√© est cependant une condition d’opposabilit√© pr√©alable implicite lorsque le contrat renvoie √† un document externe.

99 La condition pr√©alable implicite d’accessibilit√© s’av√®re un instrument utile pour l’analyse d’un document informatique. Ainsi, une clause qui requiert des manŇďuvres d’une complexit√© telle que son texte n’est pas raisonnablement accessible ne pourra pas √™tre consid√©r√©e comme faisant partie int√©grante du contrat. De m√™me, la clause contenue dans un document sur Internet et √† laquelle un contrat sur Internet renvoie, mais pour laquelle aucun lien n’est fourni, sera une clause externe. L’acc√®s √† la clause sur support √©lectronique ne doit pas √™tre plus difficile que l’acc√®s √† son √©quivalent sur support papier. Cet √©nonc√© d√©coule tant de l’interpr√©tation de l’art. 1435 C.c.Q. que du principe d’√©quivalence fonctionnelle qui sous-tend la Loi concernant le cadre juridique des technologies de l’information.

100 Il ressort de la preuve au dossier que le consommateur peut acc√©der directement √† la page du site Internet de Dell o√Ļ figure la clause d’arbitrage en cliquant sur l’hyperlien en surbrillance intitul√© « Conditions de vente » (ou « Terms and Conditions of Sale » dans la version anglaise de ce site). Ce lien est reproduit √† chaque page √† laquelle le consommateur acc√®de. D√®s que le consommateur active le lien, la page contenant les conditions de vente, dont la clause d’arbitrage, appara√ģt sur son √©cran. En ce sens, cette clause n’est pas plus difficile d’acc√®s pour le consommateur que si on lui avait remis une copie papier de l’ensemble du contrat comportant des conditions de vente inscrites √† l’endos de la premi√®re page du document.

101 √Ä mon avis, l’acc√®s du consommateur √† la clause d’arbitrage n’est pas entrav√© par la configuration de cette clause dont il peut lire le texte en cliquant une seule fois sur l’hyperlien menant aux conditions de vente. La clause d’arbitrage ne constitue donc pas une clause externe au sens du Code civil du Qu√©bec.

102 L’Union soutient que le Code du NAF est lui aussi un document externe inopposable au consommateur, M. Dumoulin. Selon l’Union, l’hyperlien m√®ne seulement √† la page d’accueil du site Internet du NAF et, pour acc√©der au texte du Code du NAF, le consommateur doit pousser sa recherche au-del√† de la page d’accueil. √Ä premi√®re vue, le fait de pousser la recherche au-del√† de la page d’accueil me para√ģt insuffisant pour conclure que le Code du NAF est un document externe. Sans plus de preuve quant aux difficult√©s d’acc√®s, j’estime que l’argument ne peut √™tre retenu. Par ailleurs, m√™me si le Code du NAF √©tait un document externe, cet argument ne permettrait pas de trancher la question de la comp√©tence de l’arbitre. En effet, √† supposer que le Code du NAF soit une clause externe nulle au sens de l’art. 1435 C.c.Q., ceci n’affecterait pas la validit√© de la clause d’arbitrage. La proc√©dure d’arbitrage serait alors simplement r√©gie par le C.p.c.

103 Je termine en soulignant que, suivant les seuls faits figurant au dossier et sans le b√©n√©fice d’un argument pr√©cis sur le caract√®re illisible ou incompr√©hensible de la clause d’arbitrage, ma conclusion aurait √©t√© la m√™me si l’Union avait aussi plaid√© que la clause √©tait illisible ou incompr√©hensible au sens de l’art. 1436 C.c.Q. Comme il a √©t√© mentionn√© pr√©c√©demment, l’hyperlien en surbrillance para√ģt √† chaque page √† laquelle le consommateur acc√®de et il n’a √©t√© pr√©sent√© aucune preuve permettant de conclure que le texte √©tait difficile √† rep√©rer √† l’int√©rieur du document, ou qu’il √©tait difficile √† lire ou √† comprendre.

104 Je souligne √©galement que, devant notre Cour, l’Union a plaid√©, de fa√ßon g√©n√©rale, le caract√®re abusif de la clause d’arbitrage. Ce moyen repose sur la prohibition pr√©vue √† l’art. 1437 C.c.Q. Cependant, comme l’Union n’a pr√©sent√© aucun argument √† l’appui de cette all√©gation, je me limiterai √† constater que l’Union n’a pas d√©montr√© le bien-fond√© de celle-ci.

7. L’opposabilit√© du recours collectif en pr√©sence d’une clause d’arbitrage

105 Comme motif distinct d’inopposabilit√© de la clause d’arbitrage √† la requ√™te de M. Dumoulin, l’Union invoque l’art. 2639 C.c.Q. et soutient que, parce qu’il s’agit d’un recours collectif, le diff√©rend int√©resse l’ordre public et ne peut de ce fait √™tre soumis √† l’arbitrage. Il s’ensuivrait donc que Dell n’a pas le droit de demander le renvoi √† l’arbitrage et que le recours collectif doit √™tre entendu au fond. √Ä mon avis, la pr√©tention de l’Union doit √™tre rejet√©e. Le recours collectif est une proc√©dure qui n’a pas pour objet de cr√©er un nouveau droit.

106 Le r√©gime proc√©dural du recours collectif a √©t√© introduit dans le Code de proc√©dure civile en 1979. Il est reconnu que la proc√©dure de recours collectif a une port√©e sociale. « Elle vise √† faciliter l’acc√®s √† la justice aux citoyens qui partagent des probl√®mes communs et qui, en l’absence de ce m√©canisme, seraient peu incit√©s √† s’adresser individuellement aux tribunaux pour faire valoir leurs droits » (Bisaillon c. Universit√© Concordia, [2006] 1 R.C.S. 666, 2006 CSC 19, par. 16) ou n’auraient pas les moyens financiers pour le faire. En ce sens, le recours collectif est certainement un r√©gime d’int√©r√™t public. Cependant, la premi√®re disposition introductive du livre IX du Code de proc√©dure civile — Le recours collectif — rappelle que, aussi important soit-il, le recours collectif ne demeure qu’un moyen de proc√©dure :

999. (. . .)

d) « recours collectif » : le moyen de proc√©dure qui permet √† un membre d’agir en demande, sans mandat, pour le compte de tous les membres.
(. . .)

107 Cette position √©tait d√©j√† admise √† l’√©poque o√Ļ le livre IX a √©t√© adopt√© :

Le recours collectif n’est pas un droit (jus); c’est un moyen. Ce n’est m√™me pas en soi une fa√ßon d’exercer un droit, un « rem√®de » au sens de la maxime ubi jus, ibi remedium. Ce n’est qu’un m√©canisme particulier qui vient s’appliquer, pour la « collectiviser », √† une fa√ßon d√©j√† existante d’exercer un droit d√©j√† existant.
(M. Bouchard, « L’autorisation d’exercer le recours collectif » (1980), 21 C. de D. 855, p. 864)

Quant √† l’√©nonc√© suivant lequel la proc√©dure de recours collectif ne cr√©e pas de nouveaux droits, il a √©t√© r√©it√©r√© √† de nombreuses reprises, y compris r√©cemment par notre Cour dans l’arr√™t Bisaillon, par. 17 et 22.

108 En l’esp√®ce, les parties se sont engag√©es √† soumettre leurs diff√©rends √† l’arbitrage obligatoire. L’effet de la convention d’arbitrage est reconnue par le droit qu√©b√©cois : art. 2638 C.c.Q. Si M. Dumoulin avait intent√© le m√™me recours mais uniquement √† titre individuel, l’argument de l’Union fond√© sur le caract√®re d’ordre public du recours collectif ne pourrait √©videmment plus √™tre invoqu√© pour s’opposer √† ce que le tribunal judiciaire saisi de l’action renvoie les parties √† l’arbitrage. Le seul fait que M. Dumoulin ait plut√īt d√©cid√© de s’adresser aux tribunaux au moyen de la proc√©dure de recours collectif a-t-il pour effet de modifier la recevabilit√© de son action? Suivant les motifs exprim√©s par le juge LeBel, pour la majorit√©, dans Bisaillon, au par. 17, la r√©ponse est n√©gative : « la proc√©dure du recours collectif ne saurait justifier une action en justice lorsque, consid√©r√©es individuellement, les diff√©rentes r√©clamations vis√©es par le recours ne le permettraient pas ».

109 Par ailleurs, l’argument de l’Union suivant lequel le recours collectif est une question int√©ressant l’ordre public qui ne peut √™tre assujettie √† l’arbitrage a perdu de sa force √† la suite de l’arr√™t de notre Cour dans Desputeaux. Dans cette affaire, l’une des parties avait invoqu√© le m√™me art. 2639 C.c.Q. pour soutenir que le diff√©rend portant sur la propri√©t√© des droits d’auteur li√©s au personnage fictif Caillou √©tait une question int√©ressant l’ordre public, qui ne pouvait donc √™tre soumise √† l’arbitrage. La Cour a affirm√© que la notion d’ordre public comprise √† l’art. 2639 C.c.Q. devait recevoir une interpr√©tation restrictive et se limitait aux seules mati√®res analogues √† celles √©num√©r√©es √† cette disposition : par. 53-55. En l’esp√®ce, ni l’hypoth√©tique action individuelle de M. Dumoulin, ni la proc√©dure de recours collectif ne sont des diff√©rends portant sur l’√©tat et la capacit√© des personnes, sur les mati√®res familiales ou encore sur des mati√®res analogues.

110 Par cons√©quent, l’argument de l’Union relatif au caract√®re d’ordre public de la proc√©dure de recours collectif ne peut √™tre retenu. Il reste maintenant √† statuer sur la question de l’application de la Loi 48, laquelle est entr√©e en vigueur apr√®s l’audition du pr√©sent pourvoi.

8. Application de la Loi modifiant la Loi sur la protection du consommateur et la Loi sur le recouvrement de certaines créances

111 La Loi 48 a √©t√© adopt√©e le 14 d√©cembre 2006 (L.Q. 2006, ch. 56). Cette loi comporte plusieurs mesures, dont une seule est pertinente en l’esp√®ce. Il s’agit de celle qui ajoute √† la Loi sur la protection du consommateur une disposition r√©gissant les stipulations d’arbitrage. Cette disposition est r√©dig√©e ainsi :

2. Cette loi est modifi√©e par l’insertion, apr√®s l’article 11, du suivant :

« 11.1. Est interdite la stipulation ayant pour effet soit d’imposer au consommateur l’obligation de soumettre un litige √©ventuel √† l’arbitrage, soit de restreindre son droit d’ester en justice, notamment en lui interdisant d’exercer un recours collectif, soit de le priver du droit d’√™tre membre d’un groupe vis√© par un tel recours.

Le consommateur peut, s’il survient un litige apr√®s la conclusion du contrat, convenir alors de soumettre ce litige √† l’arbitrage. »

La question qui se pose est de savoir si cette nouvelle disposition s’applique aux faits de l’esp√®ce.

112 Par l’effet de l’art. 18 de la Loi 48, l’art. 2 est entr√© en vigueur le 14 d√©cembre 2006. Voici le texte de l’art. 18 :

18. La pr√©sente loi entre en vigueur le 14 d√©cembre 2006, √† l’exception de l’article 1, qui entrera en vigueur le 1er avril 2007, et des articles 3, 5, 9 et 10, qui entreront en vigueur √† la date ou aux dates fix√©es par le gouvernement, mais au plus tard le 15 d√©cembre 2007.

La Loi 48 comporte une seule disposition transitoire, l’art. 17, lequel pr√©voit que les contrats conclus avant l’entr√©e en vigueur de la loi sont exclus de l’application des nouveaux art. 54.8 √† 54.16 de la Loi sur la protection du consommateur. Ce n’est pas le cas en l’esp√®ce. Cependant si l’on fait une lecture corr√©lative des art. 17 et 18, il semble √† premi√®re vue que, sauf les dispositions vis√©es √† l’art. 17, la Loi 48 s’applique aux contrats conclus avant son entr√©e en vigueur. Est-ce le cas? Et qu’en est-il de l’application de la Loi 48 √† l’instance en cours?

113 Comme l’a √©crit le professeur P.-A. C√īt√©, Interpr√©tation des lois (3e √©d. 1999), p. 213, « l’effet de la loi dans le pass√© est tout √† fait exceptionnel, alors que l’effet imm√©diat dans le pr√©sent est normal ». « Il y a effet imm√©diat de la loi nouvelle lorsque celle-ci s’applique √† l’√©gard d’une situation juridique en cours au moment o√Ļ elle prend effet : la loi nouvelle gouvernera alors le d√©roulement futur de cette situation » (p. 191). Une situation juridique est en cours lorsque les faits ou les effets sont en cours de d√©roulement au moment de la modification du droit (p. 192). Une loi d’application imm√©diate peut donc modifier les effets √† venir d’un fait survenu avant l’entr√©e en vigueur de cette loi, sans remettre en cause le r√©gime juridique ant√©rieur en vigueur lorsque ce fait est survenu.

114 Pour aider √† bien comprendre ce qu’est une situation en cours et une situation enti√®rement survenue, il est utile de reprendre l’exemple de l’obligation de garantie contre les vices cach√©s utilis√©e par les professeurs P.-A. C√īt√© et D. Jutras, Le droit transitoire civil : Sources annot√©es (feuilles mobiles), p. 2-36. L’obligation de garantie existe d√®s la conclusion de la vente, mais la stipulation de garantie ne produit d’effets concrets que lorsqu’un probl√®me reli√© au bien vendu se manifeste. La garantie entre en action soit lors de la mise en demeure, soit lors de la r√©clamation. Lorsque les effets de la garantie se sont enti√®rement produits, il ne s’agit plus d’une situation en cours et la loi nouvelle ne s’applique pas √† cette situation √† moins que cette loi ne soit r√©troactive.

115 Les faits de l’esp√®ce peuvent-ils √™tre qualifi√©s de situation juridique en cours? Si c’est le cas, la loi nouvelle s’applique. Si la situation est enti√®rement survenue, la loi nouvelle ne s’appliquera pas aux faits.

116 La seule condition de mise en Ňďuvre de la clause d’arbitrage de Dell est la naissance d’une r√©clamation, d’un conflit ou d’une controverse contre Dell (clause 13C des Conditions de vente). La situation juridique est donc enti√®rement survenue lorsque M. Dumoulin a communiqu√© sa r√©clamation √† Dell. Ainsi, tous les faits donnant lieu √† l’application de la clause d’arbitrage obligatoire se sont enti√®rement produits avant l’entr√©e en vigueur de la Loi 48.

117 Comme la Loi 48 ne comporte aucune indication permettant de conclure qu’elle s’applique de fa√ßon r√©troactive, il n’y a pas lieu de lui donner une telle port√©e.

118 D’ailleurs, une interpr√©tation r√©troactive de la Loi 48 serait probl√©matique. Premi√®rement, la r√©troactivit√© demeure l’exception : C√īt√©, p. 142-143; R. Sullivan, Sullivan and Driedger on the Construction of Statutes (4e √©d. 2002), p. 553-554. Dans la mesure o√Ļ une loi est ambigu√ę et donne lieu √† deux interpr√©tations possibles, on favorisera une interpr√©tation non r√©troactive de la loi : Ford c. Qu√©bec (Procureur g√©n√©ral), [1988] 2 R.C.S. 712, p. 742-745.

119 Deuxi√®mement, il m’appara√ģt fort improbable que le l√©gislateur ait voulu que l’art. 2 s’applique √† toutes les clauses d’arbitrage en vigueur avant le 14 d√©cembre 2006. Par exemple, un consommateur qui serait partie √† un arbitrage en cours ou m√™me un consommateur dont les pr√©tentions n’auraient pas √©t√© retenues par l’arbitre ne devrait pas √™tre fond√© √† invoquer l’art. 2 et √† pr√©tendre que la clause d’arbitrage le liant au commer√ßant est invalide, et ainsi √† r√©clamer l’arr√™t de l’instance ou obtenir l’annulation de la sentence arbitrale qui lui serait d√©favorable. √Ä moins d’indication claire √† l’effet contraire, lorsqu’un litige est soumis pour d√©cision, le d√©cideur doit se reporter √† la loi en vigueur au moment o√Ļ les faits g√©n√©rateurs de droit se sont produits.

120 Par cons√©quent, j’arrive √† la conclusion que, comme les faits entra√ģnant la mise en Ňďuvre de la clause d’arbitrage s’√©taient d√©j√† produits avant la date d’entr√©e en vigueur de l’art. 2 de la Loi 48, cette disposition ne s’applique pas aux faits de l’esp√®ce.

9. Dispositif

121 Pour ces motifs, je suis d’avis d’accueillir le pourvoi, d’infirmer l’arr√™t de la Cour d’appel, de renvoyer la demande de M. Dumoulin √† l’arbitrage et de rejeter la requ√™te pour autorisation d’exercer un recours collectif, le tout avec d√©pens.

Version française des motifs des juges Bastarache, LeBel et Fish rendus par

LES JUGES BASTARACHE ET LEBEL (dissidents) —

I. Introduction

122 Dans le pr√©sent pourvoi, notre Cour doit d√©cider si une clause d’arbitrage contenue dans un contrat de consommation √©lectronique fait obstacle √† l’exercice d’un recours collectif dans la province de Qu√©bec. Pour les motifs qui suivent, nous concluons que la clause en litige est inop√©rante et inopposable au consommateur sollicitant l’autorisation d’exercer un recours collectif. En cons√©quence, nous sommes d’avis de rejeter le pourvoi.

II. Contexte

123 Au cours de la fin de semaine du 4 au 7 avril 2003, Dell a annonc√© sa gamme d’ordinateurs de poche Axim X5 √† des prix erron√©s sur la « page d’achat » de son site Web. Les mod√®les Axim X5 300 MHz et 400 MHz y √©taient respectivement annonc√©s au prix de 89 $ et de 118 $. Il semble que les prix v√©ritables √©taient de 379 $ et de 549 $ respectivement et que l’erreur r√©sultait d’un probl√®me technique reli√© √† l’un des syst√®mes de base de donn√©es de Dell.

124 Dell a d√©couvert l’erreur le samedi 5 avril. Elle a imm√©diatement tent√© de la corriger en √©rigeant une barri√®re √©lectronique visant √† bloquer l’acc√®s √† la page fautive √† partir de la page d’accueil, dont l’adresse g√©n√©ralement publicis√©e est www.Dell.ca. Or, Dell a oubli√© qu’il √©tait toujours possible d’acc√©der √† la page bloqu√©e au moyen d’un « lien profond », soit un hyperlien direct qui permet aux internautes l’acc√®s √† une page en particulier sans passer par la page d’accueil. De nombreuses personnes semblent avoir ainsi acc√©d√© √† la page fautive et un nombre inhabituellement √©lev√© d’ordinateurs de poche Axim X5 ont √©t√© command√©s √† prix erron√©s au cours de la fin de semaine. L’intim√©, M. Dumoulin, est l’une des personnes ayant ainsi command√©, le 7 avril, un Axim X5 300 MHz au prix erron√© de 89 $ apr√®s avoir acc√©d√© au moyen du lien profond √† la page d’achat des ordinateurs de poche Axim X5.

125 Le lundi 7 avril √† 9 h 30, l’erreur sur la page d’achat a √©t√© corrig√©e et √† 14 h 30, l’acc√®s √† cette page √† partir de la page d’accueil a √©t√© r√©tabli. Plus tard le m√™me jour, Dell a publi√© sur son site Web un avis de correction informant ses clients de l’erreur qui s’√©tait gliss√©e dans les prix et indiquant qu’elle ne donnerait suite √† aucune commande d’ordinateur de poche Axim X5 au prix erron√©.

126 Le lendemain, M. Dumoulin a re√ßu un courriel l’informant de l’erreur de prix et du fait que sa commande ne serait pas trait√©e. Il a r√©pondu √† Dell par une mise en demeure de respecter le prix de vente annonc√©. Sa demande ayant √©t√© refus√©e, l’Union des consommateurs a d√©cid√© de demander √† la Cour sup√©rieure, au nom de M. Dumoulin, l’autorisation d’exercer un recours collectif.

127 Dell a contest√© la requ√™te au moyen d’une exception d√©clinatoire quant √† la comp√©tence de la Cour sup√©rieure du Qu√©bec, soutenant que la convention d’arbitrage suivante faisait partie des conditions de la vente :

Arbitrage. UNE R√ČCLAMATION, UN CONFLIT OU UNE CONTROVERSE (PAR SUITE D’UN CONTRAT, D’UN D√ČLIT CIVIL OU AUTREMENT DANS LE PASS√Č, QUI SURVIENT √Ä L’HEURE ACTUELLE OU QUI SURVIENDRA DANS LE FUTUR, Y COMPRIS CEUX QUI SONT PR√ČVUS PAR LA LOI, CEUX QUI SURVIENNENT EN COMMON LAW, LES D√ČLITS INTENTIONNELS ET LES R√ČCLAMATIONS √ČQUITABLES QUI PEUVENT, EN VERTU DE LA LOI, √äTRE SOUMIS √Ä L’ARBITRAGE OBLIGATOIRE) CONTRE DELL, ses repr√©sentants, ses employ√©s, les membres de sa direction, ses administrateurs, ses successeurs, ses ayants cause ou les membres de son groupe (collectivement, aux fins du pr√©sent paragraphe, « Dell ») d√©coulant de la pr√©sente convention ou de son interpr√©tation ou reli√© √† celle ci, ou d√©coulant de la violation, de la r√©siliation ou de la validit√© de la pr√©sente convention, des relations entre les parties, ant√©rieures, actuelles ou futures (y compris, dans la mesure autoris√©e par le droit applicable, les relations avec les tiers qui ne sont pas des signataires de la pr√©sente convention), de la publicit√© affich√©e par Dell ou d’un achat connexe DEVRA √äTRE R√ČGL√Č DE FA√áON EXCLUSIVE ET D√ČFINITIVE PAR VOIE D’ARBITRAGE OBLIGATOIRE ORGANIS√Č PAR LE NATIONAL ARBITRATION FORUM (« NAF ») conform√©ment √† son code de proc√©dure et aux proc√©dures particuli√®res concernant le r√®glement de petites r√©clamations et (ou) de conflits entre consommateurs alors en vigueur (qui peuvent √™tre consult√©s sur Internet √† l’adresse http://www.arb forum.com/, ou par t√©l√©phone au 1 800 474 2371). L’arbitrage se limitera uniquement aux conflits ou aux controverses entre le client et Dell. La d√©cision du ou des arbitres sera d√©finitive et obligatoire pour chacune des parties et elle peut √™tre accueillie devant un tribunal comp√©tent. On peut obtenir des renseignements sur le NAF et d√©poser des r√©clamations aupr√®s de cet organisme en √©crivant au P.O. Box 50191, Minneapolis, MN 55405, en envoyant un courriel √† l’adresse file@arb forum.com ou en remplissant une demande en ligne √† l’adresse http://www.arb forum.com/.

(Dossier de l’appelante, vol. III, p. 378-379, Politiques de Dell sur l’Internet, Conditions de vente, clause 13C)

Dell a plaid√© qu’en raison de cette clause, la r√©clamation de M. Dumoulin devait √™tre soumise √† l’arbitrage obligatoire.

III. Historique judiciaire

128 La Cour sup√©rieure a rejet√© l’exception d√©clinatoire (J.E. 2004 457, [2004] J.Q. no 155 (QL)). La juge Langlois a conclu que la convention d’arbitrage pr√©voyait un arbitrage organis√© par le National Arbitration Forum (« NAF »), un organisme √©tabli aux √Čtats Unis et r√©gi par le droit am√©ricain, et visait √† d√©roger √† l’art. 3149 du Code civil du Qu√©bec, L.Q. 1991, ch. 64 (« C.c.Q. »), selon lequel la renonciation du consommateur √† la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises ne peut lui √™tre oppos√©e. La juge Langlois appuie sa conclusion sur l’arr√™t Dominion Bridge Corp. c. Knai, [1998] R.J.Q. 321, dans lequel la Cour d’appel a statu√© qu’une convention pr√©voyant l’arbitrage d’un diff√©rend de travail dans un ressort √©tranger ne pouvait √™tre oppos√©e au travailleur aux termes de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q.

129 La Cour d’appel du Qu√©bec a rejet√© l’appel, mais pour des motifs diff√©rents ([2005] R.J.Q. 1448, 2005 QCCA 570). S’exprimant au nom de la Cour √† l’unanimit√©, la juge Lemelin (ad hoc) a infirm√© la d√©cision de la juge Langlois parce que, conform√©ment √† l’art. 32A du National Arbitration Forum Code of Procedure (« Code NAF »), l’arbitrage aurait pu √™tre tenu au Qu√©bec et que, pour cette raison, la situation factuelle diff√©rait de celle de l’arr√™t Dominion Bridge. La juge Lemelin a toutefois conclu √† la nullit√© de la convention d’arbitrage pour une autre raison. Estimant que les « conditions de la vente » pr√©voyant la convention d’arbitrage constituaient en soi une clause externe au sens de l’art. 1435 C.c.Q., elle a conclu que la convention d’arbitrage et ses r√®gles de proc√©dure n’avaient pas √©t√© express√©ment port√©es √† la connaissance de M. Dumoulin et que Dell n’avait pas d√©montr√© que le consommateur en avait par ailleurs eu connaissance. Elle a donc conclu que la convention d’arbitrage √©tait nulle et que la Cour sup√©rieure n’avait pas perdu sa comp√©tence √† l’√©gard du recours collectif.

IV. Analyse

A. Introduction

130 En l’esp√®ce, nous sommes en pr√©sence d’une clause d’arbitrage ins√©r√©e dans un contrat d’adh√©sion en mati√®re de consommation. La principale question soulev√©e dans le pourvoi peut √™tre formul√©e comme suit : les juridictions inf√©rieures ont elles commis une erreur de droit en refusant de renvoyer les parties √† l’arbitrage? Toutefois, avant d’analyser cette question, nous estimons utile d’examiner la nature des clauses contractuelles d’arbitrage exclusif, l’historique de leur reconnaissance en droit qu√©b√©cois et les principes qui √©clairent l’interpr√©tation des r√®gles relatives √† l’arbitrage.

(1) La nature des clauses contractuelles d’arbitrage exclusif : une clause attributive de comp√©tence

131 Il existe deux types de clauses contractuelles d’arbitrage. La clause compromissoire parfaite, ou « clause d’arbitrage exclusif », est celle par laquelle les parties s’engagent √† l’avance √† soumettre √† l’arbitrage les litiges qui pourraient na√ģtre relativement √† leur contrat et qui pr√©cise que la sentence sera finale et liera les parties. Elle se distingue d’une clause d’arbitrage purement facultative (voir Zodiak International Productions Inc. c. Polish People’s Republic, [1983] 1 R.C.S. 529, p. 533).

132 La clause d’arbitrage exclusif a pour effet de cr√©er une « juridiction priv√©e » qui suppose, pour les tribunaux d√©sign√©s par l’√Čtat tels les tribunaux de droit commun et les tribunaux administratifs, la perte de leur comp√©tence pour r√©gler les diff√©rends, ce qui rend l’arbitrage conventionnel √† la fois distinct et ind√©pendant de ces derni√®res entit√©s (voir J. E. C. Brierley, « De la convention d’arbitrage : Articles 2638 2643 », dans La r√©forme du Code civil (1993), t. 2, 1067, p. 1067 1073 et 1085 1087). L’arbitrage conventionnel a √©galement √©t√© d√©crit comme √©tablissant un « syst√®me de justice priv√©e » au b√©n√©fice des parties : « [d]’un point de vue th√©orique, l’arbitrage est une justice priv√©e dont l’origine est normalement conventionnelle. Il est donc conventionnel par sa source et juridictionnel par sa fonction » (voir S. Thuilleaux dans L’arbitrage commercial au Qu√©bec : Droit interne — Droit international priv√© (1991), p. 5 (renvois omis)).

133 C’est le degr√© de libert√© avec lequel les parties peuvent choisir la mani√®re de r√©soudre leur diff√©rend qui permet de qualifier l’arbitrage conventionnel de « juridiction priv√©e » ou de « syst√®me de justice priv√©e » :

[TRADUCTION] L’arbitrage s’entend donc du r√®glement des diff√©rends entre des parties qui conviennent de ne pas s’adresser aux tribunaux, mais de reconna√ģtre le caract√®re d√©finitif de la d√©cision prononc√©e par des experts de leur choix, √† l’endroit de leur choix et, normalement, suivant des lois dont elles ont convenu √† l’avance et suivant des r√®gles bien moins formelles et d√©taill√©es, et bien moins strictes sur le plan de la preuve et de la proc√©dure, que celles ayant cours devant les tribunaux.
(W. Tetley, International Conflict of Laws : Common, Civil and Maritime (1994), p. 390)

Les parties √† l’arbitrage conventionnel sont libres de choisir le droit applicable √† leur convention d’arbitrage, le droit applicable aux proc√©dures d’arbitrage, le droit applicable √† l’objet du litige, ainsi que les r√®gles de conflit applicables √† tout ce qui pr√©c√®de. En outre, il n’est pas n√©cessaire que le droit ainsi choisi soit le m√™me dans les quatre cas; il peut diff√©rer du droit applicable au lieu de l’arbitrage. On pourrait donc dire que la proc√©dure d’arbitrage conventionnelle est d√©localis√©e du ressort o√Ļ se d√©roule l’arbitrage (voir Tetley, p. 391 392).

134 L’une des principales diff√©rences entre la fonction judiciaire et la fonction arbitrale est que les arbitres consensuels ne sont pas des repr√©sentants de l’√Čtat mais sont d√©sign√©s par des parties priv√©es. Pour cette raison, que l’arbitrage ait lieu au Qu√©bec ou ailleurs, la sentence sera l√©galement ex√©cutoire si, comme le pr√©voient les lois qu√©b√©coises, elle est d’abord homologu√©e par les tribunaux du Qu√©bec. √Ä cet √©gard, rien ne la distingue des jugements √©trangers qui doivent d’abord √™tre homologu√©s pour avoir force de loi dans la province. C’est ce que fait remarquer R. Tremblay dans « La nature du diff√©rend et la fonction de l’arbitre consensuel » (1988), 91 R. du N. 246, p. 252 :

Il faudrait cependant se garder de confondre la fonction judiciaire et la fonction arbitrale. Le juge tire sa comp√©tence des institutions qui sont √† la base d’un √Čtat. L’arbitre, pour sa part, tire sa comp√©tence de la convention des parties. La diff√©rence est majeure. L’arbitre est choisi et nomm√© par les parties et n’est pas le repr√©sentant de l’√Čtat. Il va trancher un litige mais sa d√©cision, pour √™tre ex√©cutoire, devra √™tre homologu√©e; elle n’est pas ex√©cutoire par elle m√™me comme peut l’√™tre un jugement.

135 Les clauses d’arbitrage exclusif et d’√©lection du for fonctionnent de mani√®re tr√®s semblable. Elles ont toutes deux pour effet de d√©roger au principe de comp√©tence des tribunaux de droit commun qui, autrement, conna√ģtraient de l’affaire. De nombreux auteurs traitant des conflits de lois d√©signent simplement ces clauses, sans les distinguer, par l’expression « clauses de juridiction » : voir par exemple J. G. Collier, Conflict of Laws (3e √©d. 2001), p. 96. Dans les provinces de common law, les tribunaux surseoiront √† l’exercice de leur comp√©tence s’ils sont en pr√©sence d’une clause valide d’√©lection du for ou d’une clause valide d’arbitrage. Ils tiennent ce pouvoir de leur comp√©tence inh√©rente; or, certaines lois pr√©voient des facteurs √† prendre en consid√©ration pour d√©terminer s’il y a lieu de suspendre l’instance selon que le tribunal est en pr√©sence d’une clause d’√©lection du for ou d’une clause d’arbitrage national ou international. On a aussi tendance, au Qu√©bec, √† traiter de la m√™me fa√ßon les clauses d’arbitrage exclusif et d’√©lection du for, dont nous faisons maintenant l’historique.

(2) Reconnaissance des clauses de juridiction en droit québécois

136 Avant l’entr√©e en vigueur du C.c.Q., les r√®gles relatives √† la comp√©tence des tribunaux du Qu√©bec n’√©taient pas codifi√©es. Ceux ci se fondaient sur l’art. 27 du Code civil du Bas Canada(« C.c.B.C. ») et sur l’art. 68 du Code de proc√©dure civile, L.R.Q., ch. C 25 (« C.p.c. »), pour d√©limiter l’√©tendue de leur comp√©tence lorsqu’elle √©tait contest√©e : voir Masson c. Thompson, [1994] R.J.Q. 1032 (C.S.). L’article 27 C.c.B.C. pr√©voyait que l’√©tranger, quoique non r√©sidant dans le Bas Canada, pouvait y √™tre poursuivi « pour l’ex√©cution des obligations qu’il a contract√©es m√™me en pays √©tranger ». L’article 68 C.p.c., toujours en vigueur, pr√©cise les r√®gles nationales applicables √† la d√©termination du district judiciaire du Qu√©bec dans lequel l’action personnelle peut √™tre port√©e. Guid√©s par les principes g√©n√©raux expos√©s dans cette disposition et par l’art. 27 C.c.B.C., les tribunaux du Qu√©bec ont √©tabli un ensemble de r√®gles jurisprudentielles qui permet de d√©terminer dans quels cas les tribunaux qu√©b√©cois connaissent d’une action.

137 Avant sa modification en 1992, la disposition liminaire de l’art. 68 C.p.c. √©tait √©nonc√©e comme suit : « [s]ous r√©serve des dispositions des articles 70, 71, 74 et 75, et nonobstant convention contraire, l’action purement personnelle peut √™tre port√©e . . . ». Les tribunaux du Qu√©bec l’ont interpr√©t√©e comme une interdiction de d√©roger intentionnellement et conventionnellement au principe de la comp√©tence des tribunaux du Qu√©bec au moyen des clauses d’√©lection du for et d’arbitrage : voir S. Thuilleaux et D. M. Proctor, « L’application des conventions d’arbitrage au Canada : une difficile coexistence entre les comp√©tences judiciaire et arbitrale » (1992), 37 R.D. McGill 470, p. 477 478.

138 Suivit, en 1983, l’arr√™t de notre Cour dans Zodiak International Productions, o√Ļ une partie √† un contrat, apr√®s s’√™tre adress√©e sans succ√®s √† un tribunal d’arbitrage de Varsovie, a intent√© contre son co contractant une nouvelle action devant la Cour sup√©rieure du Qu√©bec. Notant l’existence du conflit entre l’art. 68 C.p.c. et les clauses d’arbitrage conventionnelles, notre Cour a statu√© que le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois avait n√©anmoins clairement eu l’intention de permettre ces clauses lorsqu’il a introduit l’art. 951 C.p.c., lequel dispose : « La clause compromissoire doit √™tre constat√©e par √©crit. » Devant cette disposition, le juge Chouinard, s’exprimant au nom de la Cour, a cit√© en l’approuvant le passage suivant des motifs du juge Pratte dans Syndicat de Normandin Lumber Ltd. c. Le Navire « Angelic Power », [1971] C.F. 263 (1re inst.) : « . . . je ne vois pas comment le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois aurait pu r√©glementer la forme et l’effet d’une convention dont il n’admettrait pas la validit√© » (p. 539). Peu apr√®s cette d√©cision, en 1986, le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois a modifi√© le C.c.B.C. et le C.p.c., y introduisant des r√®gles d√©taill√©es sur la validit√©, la forme et la proc√©dure de l’arbitrage conventionnel. (Ces r√®gles se trouvent maintenant au chapitre traitant express√©ment de l’arbitrage dans le livre Des obligations du C.c.Q., soit aux art. 2638 √† 2643, et au livre VII (Des arbitrages) du C.p.c.)

139 √Ä la suite de ces modifications, une contradiction a √©t√© relev√©e dans la fa√ßon pour le l√©gislateur de traiter les clauses d’√©lection du for et les clauses d’arbitrage. Par l’application de l’art. 68 C.p.c., les premi√®res √©taient toujours consid√©r√©es comme non valides : voir Thuilleaux et Proctor, p. 477 478. Il semblerait que cette diff√©rence ait √©t√© accidentelle plut√īt qu’intentionnelle. D√®s 1977, des projets de loi ont assimil√© la clause d’√©lection du for √† la clause d’arbitrage. Par exemple, l’art. 67 du Livre neuvi√®me du Projet de Code civil de 1977 pr√©voyait que les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises pouvaient refuser de reconna√ģtre les d√©cisions √©trang√®res dans les cas suivants :

67 √Ä la demande du d√©fendeur, la comp√©tence du tribunal d’origine n’est pas reconnue par les tribunaux du Qu√©bec dans les cas suivants :

1. lorsque le droit du Qu√©bec attribue √† ses tribunaux une comp√©tence exclusive, √† raison de la mati√®re ou d’un accord entre les parties, pour conna√ģtre de l’action qui a donn√© lieu √† la d√©cision √©trang√®re;

2. lorsque le droit du Qu√©bec admet, √† raison de la mati√®re ou d’un accord entre les parties, la comp√©tence exclusive d’une autre juridiction; ou

3. lorsque le droit du Qu√©bec reconna√ģt un accord par lequel comp√©tence exclusive a √©t√© attribu√©e √† des arbitres.

Cette m√©prise a cependant √©t√© corrig√©e par l’introduction de l’art. 3148 au livre dixi√®me du nouveau C.c.Q. Le deuxi√®me paragraphe de cette disposition pr√©cise l’intention du l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois d’assimiler les effets des clauses d’√©lection du for et d’arbitrage. Il dispose que « les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises ne sont pas comp√©tentes lorsque les parties ont choisi, par convention, de soumettre les litiges n√©s ou √† na√ģtre entre elles, √† propos d’un rapport juridique d√©termin√©, √† une autorit√© √©trang√®re ou √† un arbitre . . . ». Au moment de l’adoption de cette disposition, la disposition liminaire de l’art. 68 C.p.c. a √©t√© modifi√©e afin de retirer l’interdiction de d√©roger conventionnellement au principe de comp√©tence des tribunaux qu√©b√©cois et de renvoyer au livre dixi√®me du C.c.Q. les questions relatives √† la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises. Elle est maintenant r√©dig√©e comme suit : « [s]ous r√©serve des dispositions du pr√©sent chapitre et des dispositions du livre X au Code civil du Qu√©bec . . . ».

140 Peut √™tre plus par inadvertance que par intention, certaines diff√©rences mineures subsistent dans le traitement de ces deux type de clauses de juridiction en droit qu√©b√©cois. Par exemple, il n’existe, √† l’√©gard des clauses d’√©lection du for, aucune disposition analogue √† l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. qui permet de contester la validit√© des clauses d’arbitrage. Cette disposition a √©t√© introduite lors des modifications apport√©es en 1986 au C.p.c. et pr√©voit que les tribunaux qu√©b√©cois renvoient les parties √† l’arbitrage tant que la cause n’est pas inscrite et √† moins qu’ils ne constatent la nullit√© de la convention, ce dont il sera davantage question plus loin. Le deuxi√®me alin√©a de l’art. 3148 C.c.Q. ne permet pas √† lui seul de contester la validit√© des clauses de juridiction. Cela a amen√© certains auteurs √† critiquer l’organisation des r√®gles relatives √† la comp√©tence. Par exemple, dans son article intitul√© « Les objections √† la comp√©tence internationale des tribunaux qu√©b√©cois : nature et proc√©dure » (1998), 58R. du B. 145, G. Saumier critique les contradictions qui existent entre les r√®gles applicables aux clauses d’√©lection du for et aux clauses d’arbitrage : « il n’est pas justifi√© de distinguer, lorsque les parties se sont entendues d’avance sur le for appropri√© pour r√©gler leurs diff√©rends, que ce soit un tribunal arbitral ou un tribunal √©tatique » (p. 161). Mme Saumier pr√©conise l’application de r√®gles uniformes aux deux types de clauses et, √† cet √©gard, elle r√©clame avec insistance une r√©vision des r√®gles relatives √† la comp√©tence internationale des tribunaux qu√©b√©cois et leur regroupement dans un ensemble complet de r√®gles :

La r√©forme fondamentale du droit international priv√© occasionn√©e par l’adoption du Code civil du Qu√©bec n’a pas √©t√© accompagn√©e d’une r√©vision des r√®gles de proc√©dure applicables en mati√®re de comp√©tence internationale. Ainsi, une partie qui d√©sire s’opposer √† la comp√©tence internationale d’un tribunal qu√©b√©cois fait face √† une multitude de r√©gimes l√©gislatifs en mati√®re de d√©lai et de renonciation et √† une jurisprudence difficile √† concilier [. . .] Il devient donc imp√©ratif de pr√©voir des r√®gles adapt√©es au contexte international qui refl√®tent √† la fois les int√©r√™ts des parties et les int√©r√™ts du syst√®me judiciaire √©tatique et arbitral. [p. 164 165]

Le rapport du Comit√© de r√©vision de la proc√©dure civile, d√©pos√© en 2000, pr√©conise √©galement l’incorporation au C.p.c. d’un chapitre coh√©rent et complet sur le droit international priv√© qui inclurait, notamment, les r√®gles relatives √† l’arbitrage figurant actuellement au livre VII du C.p.c. (voir Comit√© de r√©vision de la proc√©dure civile, La r√©vision de la proc√©dure civile (f√©vrier 2000), Document de consultation, p. 113 114).

141 Ce bref aper√ßu historique d√©montre √† notre avis qu’il ne faudrait attacher aucune importance √† la structure du C.c.Q. ou du C.p.c. pour interpr√©ter les dispositions substantielles √† l’√©tude dans le pr√©sent pourvoi. La coh√©rence du r√©gime ne tient pas au livre du C.p.c. qui traite en particulier de l’arbitrage, ni au titre ou livre du C.c.Q. o√Ļ se trouve l’art. 3149. Le Code civil constitue en soi un ensemble qui ne doit pas √™tre morcel√© en chapitres et en dispositions d√©pourvus de tout lien entre eux. La fa√ßon dont le droit est pr√©sent√© dans le Code r√©pond √† une m√©thodologie et √† une logique qui ne permet pas d’isoler une disposition substantielle de toutes les autres. Comme l’ont soulign√© J. E. C. Brierley et R. A. Macdonald dans Quebec Civil Law : An Introduction to Quebec Private Law (1993), p. 25, [TRADUCTION] « la codification du droit priv√© du Bas Canada constituait avant tout une r√©organisation technique d’un ensemble complexe de normes dans le but d’en faciliter l’acc√®s, tant par sa forme que par son fond, aux professionnels du droit ». Depuis sa cr√©ation, le Code a √©t√© interpr√©t√© non pas en fonction de cette r√©organisation mais en fonction de la place qu’il occupe dans l’ordre juridique et de son rapport √† la th√©orie des sources qu’une telle interpr√©tation suppose (p. 97). De fait, apr√®s avoir expos√© les hypoth√®ses de forme qui sous tendent le Code, Brierley et Macdonald √©crivent ce qui suit : [TRADUCTION] « pr√©sumer que les dispositions du Code ne sont pas redondantes √©quivaut √† pr√©sumer qu’elles renvoient les unes aux autres √† l’int√©rieur du Code et que chacune d’elles doit √™tre consid√©r√©e en corr√©lation avec les autres, peu importe o√Ļ elle se trouve dans le Code » (p. 102 103). Le Code est √©videmment taxonomique, ce qui incite √† la caract√©risation conceptuelle, √† [TRADUCTION] « identifier les extensions possibles d’un concept, √©tant donn√© que ces rubriques font en soi partie de la loi » (p. 104). En outre, [TRADUCTION] « le meilleur indicateur de l’intention l√©gislative restera toujours le Code lui m√™me, consid√©r√© dans son ensemble » (p. 139). C’est pourquoi les rubriques seront consid√©r√©es comme des indicateurs de la port√©e et du sens qu’il convient d’attribuer √† une disposition donn√©e, et les autres dispositions serviront √† pr√©ciser ce sens (p. 139).

(3) Le principe de la primaut√© de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties

142 L’acceptation par le Qu√©bec des clauses de juridiction au cours des deux derni√®res d√©cennies repose sur le principe de la primaut√© de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties. Ce principe a √©t√© r√©cemment confirm√© par notre Cour dans Desputeaux c. √Čditions Chouette (1987) inc., [2003] 1 R.C.S. 178, 2003 CSC 17, qui traitait des conventions visant √† soumettre un litige √† un tribunal d’arbitrage, et dans GreCon Dimter inc. c. J.R. Normand inc., [2005] 2 R.C.S. 401, 2005 CSC 46, o√Ļ il √©tait question des conventions visant √† soumettre un litige √† une autorit√© √©trang√®re.

143 Dans Desputeaux, notre Cour a reconnu que les limites √† l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties contractantes de soumettre un litige √† l’arbitrage devaient recevoir une interpr√©tation restrictive. Plus pr√©cis√©ment, comme nous le verrons en d√©tail plus loin, nous avons conclu que la notion d’« ordre public » √† l’art. 2639, al. 1 C.c.Q. devait recevoir une interpr√©tation restrictive. Nous avons aussi d√©cid√© que les dispositions l√©gislatives identifiant simplement les tribunaux qui, au sein de l’organisation judiciaire, auront comp√©tence pour entendre les litiges concernant une mati√®re en particulier ne devraient pas √™tre interpr√©t√©es comme excluant la possibilit√© de l’arbitrage, √† moins que le l√©gislateur n’ait eu clairement l’intention de l’exclure. En tirant ces conclusions, nous avons particuli√®rement tenu compte de la politique l√©gislative qui reconna√ģt maintenant l’arbitrage comme forme valide de r√®glement des diff√©rends et qui entend de plus en faire la promotion.

144 L’article 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q. et l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. peuvent tous deux s’interpr√©ter de mani√®re √† donner r√©ellement effet au principe de la primaut√© de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties ayant caract√©ris√© le d√©veloppement du droit de l’arbitrage au Qu√©bec au cours des deux derni√®res d√©cennies. Ces dispositions visent tout particuli√®rement √† favoriser la s√©curit√© juridique des parties en leur permettant de pr√©voir √† l’avance le for auquel devront √™tre soumis leurs litiges. Elles s’inscrivent √©galement dans l’√©volution internationale vers l’harmonisation des r√®gles de comp√©tence.

145 Cette √©volution vers l’harmonisation peut s’expliquer par l’importance de la s√©curit√© juridique des transactions commerciales et internationales. Comme l’a fait remarquer le professeur J. A. Talpis dans son article « Choice of Law and Forum Selection Clauses under the New Civil Code of Quebec » (1994), 96 R. du N. 183, p. 188 189 :

[TRADUCTION] Les r√©dacteurs du nouveau Code civil du Qu√©bec avaient s√Ľrement en t√™te l’objectif essentiel de pr√©visibilit√©, le Code ayant confirm√© et √©tendu la th√©orie de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties qui, de toute √©vidence, constitue l’un des plus importants principes g√©n√©raux de droit reconnus par les nations civilis√©es. Selon ce principe, l’intention explicite ou implicite des parties d√©termine le syst√®me juridique devant r√©gir m√™me la validit√© fondamentale du contrat. Au Qu√©bec, ce principe est reconnu depuis longtemps et jouit encore d’une grande vitalit√©.

Le fait est que des consid√©rations de commodit√© commerciale et de th√©orie des conflits militent fortement en faveur de cette th√©orie, qui repose essentiellement sur les droits des parties au contrat, mais qui re√ßoit l’appui des membres de la collectivit√© commer√ßante, ainsi que des tribunaux. Par cons√©quent, le l√©gislateur a estim√© qu’il y allait de l’int√©r√™t social g√©n√©ral d’instaurer un syst√®me juridique permettant le r√®glement pr√©visible des conflits de lois.

Cette intention claire du l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois a √©t√© reconnue par notre Cour dans GreCon Dimter, o√Ļ nous avons conclu que le fait qu’une action soit incidente √† une action principale entendue par un tribunal qu√©b√©cois ne suffisait pas √† √©carter une convention visant √† soumettre toute r√©clamation r√©sultant du contrat √† une autorit√© √©trang√®re. Plus pr√©cis√©ment, nous avons conclu que l’art. 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q. devait avoir pr√©s√©ance sur l’art. 3139 C.c.Q.

(4) Les limites √† l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties

146 Naturellement, la primaut√© du principe de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties contractantes, selon lequel celles ci peuvent choisir √† l’avance le forum auquel elles soumettront le r√®glement de leurs conflits, n’est pas sans limite. Le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois l’a d’ailleurs limit√©e de multiples fa√ßons.

147 Dans l’arr√™t GreCon Dimter, nous avons relev√© les limites √† l’expression de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties de soumettre leurs diff√©rends √† une autorit√© √©trang√®re conform√©ment √† l’art. 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q. Premi√®rement, l’art. 3151 C.c.Q. conf√®re aux autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises la comp√©tence exclusive pour entendre en premi√®re instance toute action fond√©e sur la responsabilit√© civile pour tout pr√©judice r√©sultant soit de l’exposition √† une mati√®re premi√®re provenant du Qu√©bec, soit de son utilisation. Deuxi√®mement, l’art. 3149 C.c.Q., qui conf√®re aux autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises la comp√©tence pour entendre une action fond√©e sur un contrat de consommation ou sur un contrat de travail si le consommateur ou le travailleur a son domicile ou sa r√©sidence au Qu√©bec, pr√©cise que la renonciation du consommateur ou du travailleur √† cette comp√©tence ne peut lui √™tre oppos√©e. Le libell√© de ces deux dispositions fait clairement ressortir l’intention du l√©gislateur de limiter l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties.

148 En raison de la dispersion des r√®gles relatives √† l’arbitrage √† l’int√©rieur du C.c.Q., la d√©finition des limites √† l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties de soumettre leurs diff√©rends √† un tribunal arbitral soul√®ve certains doutes, comme l’illustre le pr√©sent pourvoi. La disposition g√©n√©rale se trouve √† l’art. 2639 C.c.Q. qui dispose que « [n]e peut √™tre soumis √† l’arbitrage, le diff√©rend portant sur l’√©tat et la capacit√© des personnes, sur les mati√®res familiales ou sur les autres questions qui int√©ressent l’ordre public ». S’il pr√©voit la seule exception du chapitre « De l’arbitrage », l’art. 2639 C.c.Q. ne repr√©sente cependant pas la seule exception √† l’arbitrage pr√©vue par la loi. C’est ce qu’a reconnu Brierley dans les commentaires suivants au sujet du nouveau chapitre sur l’arbitrage du Code civil :

Il reste possible qu’on d√©couvre une intention l√©gislative implicite voulant refuser l’arbitrage m√™me lorsque celui ci n’est pas express√©ment interdit (par exemple, lorsque la mati√®re est r√©serv√©e √† la connaissance des tribunaux ou organes quasi judiciaires √©tatiques). Une attribution imp√©rative de comp√©tence pour conna√ģtre un litige peut, en effet, contenir une r√®gle d’ordre public qui exclut l’arbitrage. [Nous soulignons.]
(La réforme du Code civil, p. 1074-1075)

En outre, pour √™tre ex√©cutoire, une convention d’arbitrage doit √™tre constat√©e par √©crit suivant les termes de l’art. 2640 C.c.Q. et elle doit, par ailleurs, respecter toutes les conditions de formation du contrat. Ce dernier point est vrai m√™me lorsque la convention d’arbitrage fait partie d’un contrat puisqu’elle est alors consid√©r√©e comme une convention distincte par application de l’art. 2642 C.c.Q. Les commentaires du ministre de la Justice √† propos de cette disposition reconnaissent express√©ment qu’une convention d’arbitrage est soumise aux r√®gles g√©n√©rales du contrat et peut √™tre contest√©e devant les tribunaux pour les m√™mes motifs que tout autre contrat (Commentaires du ministre de la Justice (1993), t. II). De m√™me, puisque les clauses d’arbitrage soul√®vent principalement une question de comp√©tence, un autre probl√®me se pose quant √† savoir quelle autorit√© (l’arbitre ou un tribunal judiciaire du Qu√©bec) doit d√©terminer si l’une ou l’autre de ces limites s’applique dans un cas donn√©. Cela nous ram√®ne √† la question principale soulev√©e par le pr√©sent pourvoi.

B. Questions soulevées par le présent pourvoi

149 Au sujet de la question principale de savoir si les tribunaux inf√©rieurs ont commis une erreur en refusant de renvoyer les parties √† l’arbitrage, les intim√©s ne contestent pas que, si la convention d’arbitrage est valide et s’applique au litige, les tribunaux ne poss√®dent aucun pouvoir discr√©tionnaire et ne doivent pas refuser de renvoyer les parties √† l’arbitrage. Sur ce point, l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. semble clair : si les parties ont conclu une convention d’arbitrage sur la question en litige, le tribunal renvoie les parties √† l’arbitrage, √† la demande de l’une d’elles, √† moins que la cause n’ait √©t√© inscrite ou que le tribunal ne constate la nullit√© de la convention. Il est bien √©tabli qu’en employant le verbe « renvoie » au pr√©sent de l’indicatif, le l√©gislateur a signal√© que le tribunal n’a aucun pouvoir discr√©tionnaire de refuser de renvoyer l’affaire √† l’arbitrage, √† la demande de l’une des parties, lorsque les conditions requises sont remplies (voir GreCon Dimter, par. 44; La Sarre (Ville de) c. Gabriel Aub√© inc., [1992] R.D.J. 273 (C.A.), p. 277). Une simple lecture de l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. d√©montre que trois conditions doivent √™tre remplies; (i) les parties doivent avoir conclu une convention d’arbitrage sur la question en litige, (ii) la cause ne doit pas √™tre inscrite, et (iii) le tribunal ne doit pas constater la nullit√© de la convention. Dans le cas de la derni√®re condition, il nous semble √©vident que la mention de la nullit√© de la convention vise √©galement le cas o√Ļ la convention d’arbitrage, sans √™tre nulle, ne peut √™tre oppos√©e au demandeur.

150 Il est √©galement bien √©tabli qu’une convention d’arbitrage valide a pour effet de soustraire le litige √† la comp√©tence des tribunaux de droit commun (voir Zodiak International Productions, art. 940.1 C.p.c. et art. 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q.). Il est aussi reconnu que la comp√©tence √† l’√©gard des recours individuels sur lesquels repose le recours collectif est une condition pr√©alable √† l’exercice de la comp√©tence √† l’√©gard de l’instance (Bisaillon c. Universit√© Concordia, [2006] 1 R.C.S. 666, 2006 CSC 19). Il ne fait alors aucun doute que, si la convention d’arbitrage est valide et s’attache au litige, la Cour sup√©rieure ne conna√ģt pas de l’affaire et doit renvoyer les parties √† l’arbitrage.

151 En l’esp√®ce, les intim√©s ne contestent pas que les deux premi√®res conditions prescrites par l’art. 940.1 sont remplies. La question est cependant de savoir si la Cour d’appel a commis une erreur en refusant de renvoyer les parties √† l’arbitrage parce que la convention √©tait nulle ou ne pouvait √™tre oppos√©e √† M. Dumoulin.

152 Plusieurs moyens diff√©rents ont √©t√© soulev√©s afin de d√©montrer qu’en l’esp√®ce, la clause d’arbitrage est nulle ou inopposable √† M. Dumoulin. Plus pr√©cis√©ment, on a soutenu : (1) que la convention d’arbitrage ne saurait √™tre oppos√©e √† M. Dumoulin, un consommateur, parce qu’elle constitue une renonciation √† la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises au sens de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q.; et (2) qu’elle est nulle a) parce qu’elle vise un litige en mati√®re de consommation qui, en soi, rel√®ve de l’ordre public au sens de l’art. 2639 C.c.Q.; b) parce qu’elle constitue une renonciation √† la comp√©tence de la Cour sup√©rieure √† l’√©gard des recours collectifs et que cette renonciation est contraire √† l’ordre public en application de l’art. 2639 C.c.Q.; c) parce que M. Dumoulin n’a pas vraiment consenti √† cette convention, qui lui a √©t√© impos√©e dans le cadre d’un contrat d’adh√©sion; d) parce que la convention est abusive et contrevient √† l’art. 1437 C.c.Q.; et e) parce qu’elle fait partie d’une clause externe qui n’a pas √©t√© express√©ment port√©e √† la connaissance de M. Dumoulin comme l’exige l’art. 1435 C.c.Q. Chacun de ces arguments pose en l’esp√®ce une sous question qui sera abord√©e de fa√ßon distincte √† la section D ci apr√®s. Mais avant d’examiner ces sous questions, il est n√©cessaire de r√©pondre √† deux questions pr√©liminaires.

153 Premi√®rement, nous devons d√©cider si les modifications apport√©es r√©cemment par le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois √† la Loi sur la protection du consommateur, L.R.Q., ch. P 40.1 (« L.p.c. »), s’appliquent au pr√©sent pourvoi. Le projet de loi 48, la Loi modifiant la Loi sur la protection du consommateur et la Loi sur le recouvrement de certaines cr√©ances, 2e sess., 37e l√©g. (maintenant L.Q. 2006, c. 56), a √©t√© sanctionn√© le 14 d√©cembre 2006, soit le jour suivant celui de l’audition du pr√©sent pourvoi par notre Cour. L’article 2 du projet de loi 48 est ainsi r√©dig√© :

2. Cette loi [la Loi sur la protection du consommateur] est modifi√©e par l’insertion, apr√®s l’article 11, du suivant :

« 11.1. Est interdite la stipulation ayant pour effet soit d’imposer au consommateur l’obligation de soumettre un litige √©ventuel √† l’arbitrage, soit de restreindre son droit d’ester en justice, notamment en lui interdisant d’exercer un recours collectif, soit de le priver du droit d’√™tre membre d’un groupe vis√© par un tel recours.

Le consommateur peut, s’il survient un litige apr√®s la conclusion du contrat, convenir alors de soumettre ce litige √† l’arbitrage. »

Il n’est pas contest√© que, si cette modification s’applique en l’esp√®ce, il ne serait pas n√©cessaire de r√©pondre aux autres sous questions puisque la troisi√®me condition requise pour l’application de l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. ne serait manifestement pas remplie.

154 Deuxi√®mement, nous devons d√©terminer l’√©tendue de l’analyse √† laquelle un tribunal doit proc√©der en application de l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. pour « constater » si la convention d’arbitrage est nulle. L’appelante soutient que cette analyse devrait n’√™tre que sommaire (dite aussi analyse prima facie); les intim√©s pr√©tendent quant √† eux qu’elle devrait √™tre exhaustive. Selon la r√©ponse √† cette question, il est possible que seuls certains des motifs de nullit√© invoqu√©s par les intim√©s puissent √™tre l√©gitimement pr√©sent√©s √† l’√©tape d’une demande de renvoi, alors qu’il serait plus appropri√© de laisser l’arbitre statuer sur les autres motifs, sous r√©serve du contr√īle subs√©quent des tribunaux.

C. Questions préliminaires

(1) L’incidence du projet de loi 48 sur le pr√©sent pourvoi

155 L’article 2 est la disposition du projet de loi 48 qui pr√©sente le plus d’int√©r√™t pour le pr√©sent pourvoi. Il modifie la L.p.c. en interdisant et en annulant toute clause contractuelle qui oblige un consommateur √† soumettre un diff√©rend √† l’arbitrage. Conform√©ment √† la L.p.c. modifi√©e, un consommateur et un commer√ßant ne peuvent conclure une convention d’arbitrage valide qu’apr√®s la naissance d’un litige. Il est admis que, si cette modification s’applique en l’esp√®ce, le pourvoi devrait √™tre rejet√© puisque la convention d’arbitrage sur laquelle repose l’exception d√©clinatoire soulev√©e par l’appelante n’aurait manifestement aucun effet. Il convient de signaler que notre interpr√©tation de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. conduit au m√™me r√©sultat que le projet de loi 48. On pourrait pr√©tendre que l’introduction du projet de loi 48 montre que l’Assembl√©e l√©gislative ne partageait pas notre point de vue sur l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. √Ä cela, nous r√©pondons qu’il est plus vraisemblable que ce soit la mauvaise interpr√©tation de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. donn√©e en remarque incidente dans l’arr√™t Dominion Bridge, et dans la d√©cision de la Cour d’appel en l’esp√®ce, qui ait amen√© le l√©gislateur √† agir rapidement en vue d’assurer la protection des consommateurs de la province.

156 L’article 18 du projet de loi 48 pr√©voit que ses dispositions entrent en vigueur le 14 d√©cembre 2006, sauf quelques unes d’entre elles qui entreront en vigueur ult√©rieurement (entre le 1er avril 2007 et le 15 d√©cembre 2007). Puisque l’art. 2 du projet de loi 48 est maintenant en vigueur, nous devons d√©cider s’il produit son effet sur l’instance en cours.

157 Selon les principes d’interpr√©tation des lois bien √©tablis, en g√©n√©ral, les lois nouvelles touchant le fond ne s’appliquent pas aux instances en cours. Il est √©galement bien reconnu qu’une loi nouvelle s’appliquera √† une instance en cours s’il est manifeste qu’elle vise √† modifier r√©troactivement les droits substantiels en cause. Le professeur C√īt√© √©nonce de la fa√ßon suivante les principes applicables :

En principe, les lois nouvelles touchant le fond ne s’appliquent pas aux instances en cours, y compris celles qui sont en appel. Le processus judiciaire √©tant g√©n√©ralement d√©claratif de droit, le juge d√©clare les droits des parties tels qu’ils existaient le jour o√Ļ la cause d’action a pris naissance : le jour du d√©lit, le jour de la formation du contrat, le jour de la perp√©tration de l’acte criminel, et ainsi de suite. Par contre, une loi de fond nouvelle est applicable √† une instance en cours lorsqu’elle modifie de fa√ßon r√©troactive le droit qui existait le jour du d√©lit, du contrat, de l’acte criminel, et ainsi de suite. Une instance en cours pourra donc √™tre r√©gie par une loi nouvelle r√©troactive, ceci valant m√™me pour la loi r√©troactive adopt√©e pendant que l’instance est pendante en appel.
(P. A. C√īt√©, Interpr√©tation des lois (3e √©d. 1999), p. 225)

158 La r√®gle diff√®re dans le cas des lois nouvelles de proc√©dure. Celles ci ont un effet imm√©diat et s’appliquent aux instances en cours. Ce qui, comme l’explique le professeur C√īt√©, ne veut pas dire qu’elles ont un effet r√©troactif :

Les lois de proc√©dure s’appliquant aussi aux instances en cours, on a appel√© ce ph√©nom√®ne « r√©troactivit√© » par analogie avec l’effet des lois concernant le fond. Or, les lois de proc√©dure ne r√©gissent pas le droit dont le juge d√©clare l’existence : elles concernent les proc√©d√©s qui servent √† faire valoir le droit, elles traitent du d√©roulement du proc√®s. Il est donc normal qu’une loi touchant le d√©roulement du proc√®s s’applique aux proc√®s en cours pour ce qui concerne leur d√©roulement futur. Il n’y a pas l√† de r√©troactivit√©, simplement un effet imm√©diat. [p. 226]

159 Nous devons donc d√©cider si l’art. 2 du projet de loi 48 touche des questions de fond ou de proc√©dure. S’il touche des questions de fond, nous devrons en outre d√©terminer s’il a des effets r√©troactifs.

160 Selon nous, l’art. 2 du projet de loi 48 est une disposition de fond puisqu’il affecte un droit contractuel des parties : le droit d’une partie de voir sa cause renvoy√©e √† l’arbitrage, et non devant les tribunaux. Il est vrai qu’√† certains √©gards, ce droit s’apparente √† un droit proc√©dural : il d√©termine la fa√ßon de faire valoir un droit. Cela dit, il s’agit manifestement de plus qu’un simple droit proc√©dural. Cet article 2 touche √† la comp√©tence des tribunaux et « il est bien √©tabli que la comp√©tence n’est pas une question de proc√©dure » (Banque Royale du Canada c. Concrete Column Clamps (1961) Ltd., [1971] R.C.S. 1038, p. 1040; voir aussi C√īt√©, p. 231).

161 Nous estimons en outre que l’art. 2 du projet de loi 48 n’a pas d’effet r√©troactif. √Ä moins que la loi ne dispose autrement, explicitement ou par d√©duction n√©cessaire, cet article ne doit pas √™tre interpr√©t√© comme ayant un tel effet. La remarque incidente formul√©e par le juge Wright dans In re Athlumney, [1898] 2 Q.B. 547, p. 551 552, refl√®te encore parfaitement le droit applicable en l’esp√®ce :

[TRADUCTION] Il se peut qu’aucune r√®gle d’interpr√©tation ne soit plus solidement √©tablie que celle ci : un effet r√©troactif ne doit pas √™tre donn√© √† une loi de mani√®re √† alt√©rer un droit ou une obligation existants, sauf en mati√®re de proc√©dure, √† moins que ce r√©sultat ne puisse pas √™tre √©vit√© sans faire violence au texte. Si la r√©daction du texte peut donner lieu √† plusieurs interpr√©tations, on doit l’interpr√©ter comme devant prendre effet pour l’avenir seulement.

(Voir également Gustavson Drilling (1964) Ltd. c. Ministre du Revenu national, [1977] 1 R.C.S. 271, p. 279.)

162 Aucune disposition du projet de loi 48 ne nous am√®ne √† croire que son art. 2 devrait √™tre interpr√©t√© comme ayant un effet r√©troactif. Les dispositions transitoires ne l’indiquent pas et ne sauraient √™tre interpr√©t√©es en ce sens. Par cons√©quent, la pr√©somption g√©n√©rale de la non r√©troactivit√© de la loi n’a pas √©t√© r√©fut√©e et l’art. 2 du projet de loi 48 ne devrait pas recevoir une interpr√©tation ayant pour effet d’annuler la convention d’arbitrage en litige puisque celle ci a √©t√© conclue avant l’entr√©e en vigueur de la disposition.

(2) La port√©e de l’analyse requise par l’art. 940.1 C.p.c.

163 L’appelante invoque le principe de comp√©tence comp√©tence, soutenant que le tribunal qui doit proc√©der √† un examen en application de l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. devrait se limiter √† un examen sommaire. On a affirm√© que ce principe comporte deux volets (voir par exemple E. Gaillard et J. Savage, dir., Fouchard, Gaillard, Goldman on International Commercial Arbitration (1999), p. 401). D’abord, selon le principe de comp√©tence comp√©tence, les arbitres poss√®dent le pouvoir de statuer sur leur propre comp√©tence. Ce principe est bien √©tabli dans notre droit et le l√©gislateur l’a reconnu √† l’art. 943 C.p.c. Ce qui importe d’avantage pour les besoins de l’esp√®ce, il s’agit d’une r√®gle qui √©tablit une priorit√© chronologique selon laquelle les arbitres doivent les premiers pouvoir statuer sur leur comp√©tence, sous r√©serve du contr√īle subs√©quent des tribunaux. Cet aspect du principe de comp√©tence comp√©tence fait toujours l’objet de d√©bat et donne lieu √† diff√©rentes applications.

164 En cherchant √† d√©terminer la port√©e de ce principe, il ne faut pas oublier la diff√©rence qui existe entre les types de contestation dont peut faire l’objet la comp√©tence de l’arbitre. Elles se classent en deux grandes cat√©gories. La premi√®re comprend les contestations relatives √† la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage conclue par les parties. La seconde cat√©gorie inclut les contestations relatives √† l’applicabilit√© de la convention d’arbitrage au litige en cause.

165 Il est relativement bien accept√© que le principe de comp√©tence comp√©tence s’applique aux contestations de la comp√©tence relatives √† l’applicabilit√© de la convention d’arbitrage (voir par exempleKingsway Financial Services Inc. c. 118997 Canada inc., [1999] J.Q. no 5922 (QL) (C.A.)). Dans toute contestation relative √† la comp√©tence arbitrale o√Ļ il est all√©gu√© que le litige n’est pas vis√© par la clause d’arbitrage, il a √©t√© √©tabli que les tribunaux doivent renvoyer l’affaire √† l’arbitrage et permettre √† l’arbitre de trancher la question, √† moins qu’il soit √©vident que le litige √©chappe √† sa comp√©tence. (Voir L. Y. Fortier, « Delimiting the Spheres of Judicial and Arbitral Power : “Beware, My Lord, of Jealousy” » (2001), 80 R. du B. can. 143, p. 146; P. Bienvenu, « The Enforcement of International Arbitration Agreements and Referral Applications in the NAFTA Region » (1999), 59 R. du B. 705, p. 721; J. B. Casey et J. Mills, Arbitration Law of Canada : Practice and Procedure (2005), p. 64; L. Marquis, « La comp√©tence arbitrale : une place au soleil ou √† l’ombre du pouvoir judiciaire » (1990), 21 R.D.U.S. 303, p. 318 319.) Toutefois, la question de savoir si, en g√©n√©ral, les tribunaux doivent renvoyer l’affaire √† l’arbitrage lorsque la contestation vise la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage est elle m√™me plus controvers√©e.

166 Dans certains cas, les tribunaux ont reconnu que les arbitres devraient les premiers statuer sur la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage et ont renvoy√© les parties √† l’arbitrage (voir par exempleWorld LLC c. Parenteau & Parenteau Int’l Inc., [1998] A.Q. no 736 (QL) (C.S.); Automobiles Duclos inc. c. Ford du Canada lt√©e, [2001] R.J.Q. 173 (C.S.); Simbol Test Systems Inc. c. Gnubi Communications Inc., [2002] J.Q. no 437 (QL) (C.S.); Sonox Sia c. Albury Grain Sales Inc., [2005] J.Q. no 9998 (QL) (C.S.)). Dans d’autres cas, les tribunaux ont proc√©d√© √† un examen exhaustif de la validit√© de la clause d’arbitrage avant de renvoyer ou non l’affaire √† l’arbitrage (voir par exemple Martineau c. Verreault, [2001] J.Q. no 3103 (QL) (C.S.); Chass√© c. Union canadienne, compagnie d’assurance, [1999] R.R.A. 165 (C.S.); Lemieux c. 9110 9595 Qu√©bec inc., [2004] J.Q. no 9489 (QL) (C.Q.); Joseph c. Assurances g√©n√©rales des Caisses Desjardins inc., SOQUIJ AZ 99036669 (C.Q.); Bureau c. Beauce Soci√©t√© mutuelle d’assurance g√©n√©rale, SOQUIJ AZ 96035006 (C.Q.); Richard Gagn√© c. Poir√©, [2006] J.Q. no 9350 (QL), 2006 QCCS 4980).

167 Les difficult√©s caus√©es par la r√©daction impr√©cise du C.p.c. confirment maintenant la n√©cessit√© d’un examen complet de la question afin de d√©terminer la fa√ßon appropri√©e d’aborder l’exercice du pouvoir de surveillance de la Cour sup√©rieure.

168 L’appelante pr√©conise ce que l’on a appel√© « l’analyse sommaire » suivant laquelle le tribunal saisi d’une demande de renvoi devrait renvoyer l’affaire √† l’arbitrage s’il est convaincu, √† l’issue d’une analyse sommaire, que l’action n’a pas √©t√© engag√©e en contravention d’une convention d’arbitrage valide. En aucun cas l’appelante, et la doctrine sur laquelle elle s’appuie, n’offrent une d√©finition pr√©cise du terme « sommaire » dans ce contexte. Selon nous, elle veut dire par ses observations que le tribunal saisi d’une demande de renvoi devrait d√©cider si la convention d’arbitrage semble valide et applicable au litige sur la seule foi des documents produits au soutien de la requ√™te, en pr√©sumant qu’ils sont v√©ridiques, sans entendre aucun t√©moignage. La d√©cision du tribunal sur la question n’aurait pas l’autorit√© de la chose jug√©e et le tribunal arbitral pourrait lui m√™me proc√©der √† un examen exhaustif de la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage, sous r√©serve du contr√īle subs√©quent des tribunaux.

169 √Ä l’inverse, les intim√©s pr√©conisent ce que l’on a appel√© une « analyse exhaustive » suivant laquelle les arguments soulev√©s √† l’encontre de la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage devraient √™tre examin√©s de fa√ßon exhaustive avant que l’affaire soit renvoy√©e (ou non) √† l’arbitrage. Le tribunal saisi d’une demande de renvoi pourrait ainsi, par exemple, entendre des t√©moins avant de statuer sur la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage. De plus, sa d√©cision aurait sur cette question l’autorit√© de la chose jug√©e (res judicata). Comme le signale dans son m√©moire l’intervenante la Cour d’arbitrage international de Londres, les tenants des deux fa√ßons de proc√©der ont un objectif commun — favoriser l’efficience des m√©canismes de r√®glement des diff√©rends. L√† o√Ļ ils ne s’entendent pas, c’est sur la meilleure fa√ßon d’atteindre cet objectif.

170 Les partisans d’un examen judiciaire exhaustif de la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage aux termes de l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. s’appuient sur une logique d’« √©conomie de moyens ». Ils soutiennent que le renvoi de la question de la validit√© d’une convention au tribunal d’arbitrage, dont la comp√©tence m√™me est contest√©e par l’une des parties, afin de lui permettre de statuer en premier sur la question, constitue une perte de temps et d’argent puisque les parties devront presque in√©vitablement revenir devant le tribunal pour qu’il d√©cide de la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage conform√©ment √† l’art. 943.1 C.p.c. (si le tribunal arbitral s’est lui m√™me d√©clar√© comp√©tent) ou pour poursuivre l’instance interrompue par la demande de renvoi (si le tribunal arbitral s’est lui m√™me d√©clar√© incomp√©tent). Ils affirment en outre que, puisque la comp√©tence du tribunal arbitral d√©pend enti√®rement de la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage, il est illogique de lui demander d’√™tre le premier √† statuer sur cette question.

171 Ceux qui souhaitent que les tribunaux se limitent √† un examen sommaire insistent sur la pr√©vention des tactiques dilatoires. Ils soutiennent qu’un examen exhaustif de la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage, fond√© sur une preuve testimoniale et documentaire, peut durer des mois et qu’autoriser un tel examen √† l’√©tape de la demande de renvoi permettrait √† une partie r√©calcitrante de retarder ind√Ľment le d√©but ou le d√©roulement du processus d’arbitrage. Ils affirment en outre que la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage devrait √™tre pr√©sum√©e et le fait d’en limiter l’examen exhaustif au seul cas o√Ļ le tribunal est saisi d’une requ√™te fond√©e sur l’art. 943.1 C.p.c. ne soul√®ve pas les m√™mes probl√®mes, puisque cette disposition pr√©voit express√©ment que le tribunal d’arbitrage peut poursuivre la proc√©dure et rendre une sentence tant qu’il n’a pas √©t√© statu√© sur la requ√™te.

172 Il importe particuli√®rement de signaler que l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. indique clairement que le tribunal doit r√©pondre √† la question pr√©liminaire concernant la validit√© de la convention; la disposition ne pr√©cise pas qu’il ne doit faire qu’un examen « sommaire ». La Cour sup√©rieure du Qu√©bec, en tant que tribunal d√©sign√© par l’art. 96 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867, poss√®de une comp√©tence inh√©rente et conna√ģt en premi√®re instance de toute affaire, sauf si une loi lui retire cette comp√©tence, conform√©ment aux art. 31 et 33 C.p.c. (voir √©galement T. A. Cromwell, « Aspects of Constitutional Judicial Review in Canada » (1995), 46 S.C. L. Rev. 1027, p. 1030 1031, cit√© dans MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. c. Simpson, [1995] 4 R.C.S. 725, par. 32). Pour ce qui est des questions portant sur une clause d’arbitrage exclusif, le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois a jug√© bon, √† l’art. 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q., de d√©pouiller les tribunaux du Qu√©bec de leur comp√©tence, sous r√©serve des exceptions examin√©es pr√©c√©demment et de l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. qui, √† premi√®re vue, conf√®re clairement √† la Cour sup√©rieure le pouvoir de statuer sur la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage.

173 Selon l’argument contextuel fond√© sur la version fran√ßaise de l’art. 940.1 C.p.c., le mot « constate » signifie effectivement que les tribunaux ne peuvent se livrer qu’√† un examen sommaire de la nullit√© de la convention d’arbitrage. Or, l’art. 2642 C.c.Q. reprend les m√™mes termes au sujet de l’examen de la clause d’arbitrage par l’arbitre : « la constatation de la nullit√© du contrat par les arbitres ne rend pas nulle pour autant la convention d’arbitrage ». Si l’on applique le raisonnement voulant que le terme « constate » √† l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. signifie un examen sommaire pr√©vu √† l’art. 2642 C.c.Q., l’arbitre devrait s’en tenir √† un examen sommaire de la validit√© du contrat contenant la clause d’arbitrage et ne pourrait proc√©der √† une analyse approfondie de la pr√©tendue nullit√© du contrat ni entendre la preuve d√©pos√©e au soutien de cette pr√©tention. Pareil r√©sultat confirmerait que cet argument est mal fond√© et illogique. De plus, dans un contexte juridique, le verbe « constate » ne semble pas supposer un examen superficiel. Il peut tout aussi bien s’entendre d’un examen sur le fond d’une question de fait et de droit. Voir G. Cornu, Vocabulaire juridique (8e √©d. 2000), p. 208.

174 De plus, les commentaires du ministre de la Justice au sujet de l’art. 2642 C.c.Q. √©tayent la pr√©tention que les tribunaux peuvent proc√©der √† un examen exhaustif de la nullit√© lorsque la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage est contest√©e. Suivant cette disposition, une convention d’arbitrage contenue dans un contrat demeure une convention distincte des autres clauses du contrat qui la contient. Par cons√©quent, tous les motifs g√©n√©raux d’invalidation des contrats reconnus en droit civil, y compris ceux qui visent express√©ment les contrats de consommation ou d’adh√©sion, doivent s’appliquer √† la convention d’arbitrage. Le commentaire du ministre de la Justice reconna√ģt express√©ment que la convention d’arbitrage est soumise aux r√®gles g√©n√©rales des contrats et peut √™tre contest√©e devant les tribunaux pour les m√™mes motifs que tout autre contrat :

Cette r√®gle [art. 2642 C.c.Q.] n’exclut pas qu’une partie demande au tribunal de prononcer la nullit√© de la convention d’arbitrage si, √† titre d’exemple, elle n’a pas donn√© un consentement libre et √©clair√© ou qu’elle n’avait pas la capacit√© de contracter. Les r√®gles g√©n√©rales du droit des obligations s’appliquent √† cette convention comme √† tout contrat.
(Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, t. II, p. 1651)

175 On a √©galement invoqu√© la Loi type de la CNUDCI sur l’arbitrage commercial international du 21 juin 1985 (« Loi type »), Doc. N.U. A/40/17, annexe I, et la Convention pour la reconnaissance et l’ex√©cution des sentences arbitrales √©trang√®res, 330 R.T.N.U. 3 (« Convention de New York »), des documents internationaux desquels sont inspir√©es les r√®gles qu√©b√©coises sur l’arbitrage et qui peuvent servir √† l’interpr√©tation des r√®gles du C.p.c. (voir GreCon Dimter, par. 39 43, et art. 940.6 C.p.c.). On a soutenu que suivant ces textes, les tribunaux ne peuvent proc√©der qu’√† un examen sommaire de la nullit√©. Une √©tude de ces documents nous a convaincus que les r√©dacteurs de la Loi type et de la Convention de New York voulaient que les tribunaux et les arbitres poss√®dent une comp√©tence concurrente √† l’√©gard de ces questions. √Ä notre avis, en fondant les r√®gles qu√©b√©coises sur ces documents internationaux, le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois a adopt√© la m√™me approche. Le rapport du groupe de travail Ňďuvrant √† la pr√©paration de la Loi type pr√©cise que le groupe de travail a choisi de ne pas adopter une approche fond√©e sur la nullit√© « apparente » :

77. Il a √©t√© sugg√©r√© que [l’article 8 de la Loi type] ne soit pas interpr√©t√© comme stipulant que le tribunal doit examiner en d√©tail la validit√© d’une convention d’arbitrage et que cette id√©e pouvait √™tre exprim√©e en exigeant simplement une constatation prima facie ou en remaniant la fin de la phrase de mani√®re √† ce qu’elle se lise comme suit : « √† moins qu’il ne constate que ladite convention est manifestement caduque ». √Ä l’appui de cette id√©e, on a fait remarquer que cela reviendrait √† consacrer le principe selon lequel il convenait de laisser d’abord le tribunal arbitral statuer sur sa comp√©tence, sous r√©serve d’un contr√īle ult√©rieur par une instance judiciaire. Toutefois, selon l’avis qui a pr√©valu, dans les cas envisag√©s au paragraphe 1, c’est √† dire o√Ļ les parties n’√©taient pas d’accord quant √† l’existence d’une convention d’arbitrage valide, cette question devrait √™tre r√©gl√©e par une instance judiciaire, sans avoir √† √™tre soumise au pr√©alable √† un tribunal arbitral dont la comp√©tence √©tait mise en doute. Le Groupe de travail, apr√®s d√©lib√©ration, a d√©cid√© de conserver le texte du paragraphe 1.
(Rapport du Groupe de travail des pratiques en matière de contrats internationaux sur les travaux de sa cinquième session (New York, 22 février 4 mars 1983), A/CN.9/233)

Cette conclusion est confirmée par P. Binder dans International Commercial Arbitration and Conciliation in UNCITRAL Model Law Jurisdictions (2e éd. 2005), p. 91.

176 L’adh√©sion √† une approche fond√©e sur une comp√©tence concurrente √† l’√©gard des questions portant sur la validit√© de la convention peut se d√©fendre dans une logique d’« √©conomie de moyens » et reste compatible avec le principe g√©n√©ral favorisant l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties. Bien que l’art. 940.1 C.p.c. manque de pr√©cision quant √† l’√©tendue de l’examen auquel devrait se livrer le tribunal, nous croyons qu’une m√©thode discr√©tionnaire pr√©conisant le recours √† l’arbitre dans la plupart des cas servirait mieux l’intention claire du l√©gislateur de favoriser le processus arbitral et son efficacit√©, tout en pr√©servant le pouvoir fondamental de surveillance de la Cour sup√©rieure. Lorsqu’il est saisi d’un moyen d√©clinatoire, le tribunal judiciaire ne devrait statuer sur la validit√© de l’arbitrage que s’il peut le faire sur la foi des documents et des actes de proc√©dure produits par les parties, sans devoir entendre la preuve ni tirer de conclusions sur la pertinence et la fiabilit√© de celle ci.

177 Il semble que cette approche s’inscrive davantage dans le cadre l√©gislatif qui favorise un contr√īle a posteriori du processus et des sentences arbitrales. Comme nous l’avons d√©j√† mentionn√©, la d√©cision d’un arbitre qui se d√©clare comp√©tent pourra toujours faire l’objet d’un examen exhaustif par le tribunal saisi de la question en application de l’art. 943.1 C.p.c. De plus, l’art. 946.4, al. 1(2) C.p.c. pr√©voit express√©ment, entre autres choses, qu’un tribunal peut refuser l’homologation d’une sentence arbitrale s’il est √©tabli que la convention d’arbitrage √† l’origine de cette sentence est invalide. Ces deux moyens de contr√īle a posteriori ne nuisent pas √† l’efficacit√© du processus arbitral : le dernier moyen s’exerce une fois le processus termin√©, alors que le premier n’a pas pour effet d’entra√ģner la suspension du processus.

178 Cela dit, nous croyons que les tribunaux peuvent toujours exercer un certain pouvoir discr√©tionnaire quant √† l’√©tendue de l’examen qu’ils choisissent de faire lorsque la validit√© d’une convention d’arbitrage est contest√©e. Dans certaines circonstances, et en particulier dans celles qui m√©ritent vraiment d’√™tre qualifi√©es d’« arbitrage commercial international », il peut √™tre plus avantageux que l’arbitre soit saisi en premi√®re instance de toutes les questions de comp√©tence. Dans d’autres circonstances, telles qu’en l’esp√®ce o√Ļ il nous faut interpr√©ter certaines dispositions du Code civil, il semblerait pr√©f√©rable que le tribunal entende au complet la contestation relative √† la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage. √Ä notre avis, les juridictions inf√©rieures ont eu raison d’examiner pleinement la contestation de M. Dumoulin quant √† la validit√© de la convention d’arbitrage, compte tenu de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q.

D. Motifs possibles de nullit√© de la convention d’arbitrage

(1) La clause d’arbitrage constitue t elle une renonciation √† la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises qui ne peut √™tre oppos√©e √† M. Dumoulin?

179 Nous devons maintenant interpr√©ter l’art. 3149 C.c.Q., qui se trouve √† la section II, « Des actions personnelles √† caract√®re patrimonial », du chapitre II, « Dispositions particuli√®res » du titre troisi√®me, « De la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec », figurant au livre dixi√®me du Code civil, intitul√© « Du droit international priv√© ». La section II comporte quatre dispositions, √† commencer par l’art. 3148, al. 1 dont les par. (1) √† (5) √©noncent les r√®gles g√©n√©rales permettant de d√©terminer les cas dans lesquels les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises sont comp√©tentes √† l’√©gard d’un litige. Tel qu’indiqu√© pr√©c√©demment, le deuxi√®me alin√©a pr√©cise quand les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises perdent leur comp√©tence pour conna√ģtre d’un litige √† l’√©gard duquel elles auraient par ailleurs comp√©tence. Suivent ensuite les art. 3149 √† 3151 o√Ļ comme nous l’avons vu, le l√©gislateur semble limiter l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties.

180 Par souci de commodité, nous reproduisons les art. 3148, al. 2 et 3149 C.c.Q. :

3148. Dans les actions personnelles à caractère patrimonial, les autorités québécoises sont compétentes dans les cas suivants :
(. . .)
Cependant, les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises ne sont pas comp√©tentes lorsque les parties ont choisi, par convention, de soumettre les litiges n√©s ou √† na√ģtre entre elles, √† propos d’un rapport juridique d√©termin√©, √† une autorit√© √©trang√®re ou √† un arbitre, √† moins que le d√©fendeur n’ait reconnu la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises.

3149. Les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises sont, en outre, comp√©tentes pour conna√ģtre d’une action fond√©e sur un contrat de consommation ou sur un contrat de travail si le consommateur ou le travailleur a son domicile ou sa r√©sidence au Qu√©bec; la renonciation du consommateur ou du travailleur √† cette comp√©tence ne peut lui √™tre oppos√©e.

181 La premi√®re phrase de l’art. 3149 conf√®re aux « autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises » le pouvoir d’entendre une action fond√©e sur un contrat de consommation ou sur un contrat de travail dans la mesure o√Ļ le consommateur ou le travailleur a sa r√©sidence ou son domicile au Qu√©bec. Il faut consid√©rer cette phrase comme une protection suppl√©mentaire accord√©e au consommateur ou au travailleur puisqu’elle attribue comp√©tence aux autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises lorsque ces personnes agissent en qualit√© de demandeurs, alors que les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises sont d√©j√† comp√©tentes lorsque le consommateur ou le travailleur est d√©sign√© comme d√©fendeur (art. 3148, al. 1(1)).

182 La deuxi√®me phrase de l’art. 3149 pr√©voit que la renonciation du consommateur ou du travailleur √† la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises ne peut lui √™tre oppos√©e. Le consommateur ou le travailleur renonce √† la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises en concluant exactement le genre de convention envisag√©e √† l’art. 3148, al. 2, par laquelle les parties « ont choisi [. . .] de soumettre les litiges n√©s ou √† na√ģtre entre elles [. . .] √† une autorit√© √©trang√®re ou √† un arbitre ». Cette deuxi√®me phrase a pour effet d’emp√™cher la partie d√©fenderesse de pr√©tendre, en r√©ponse √† une action port√©e devant une autorit√© qu√©b√©coise, la Cour sup√©rieure par exemple, que le tribunal n’a pas comp√©tence pour entendre l’affaire par l’application d’une clause d’√©lection de for ou d’arbitrage.

183 En l’esp√®ce, M. Dumoulin a son domicile au Qu√©bec et la Cour sup√©rieure est clairement une autorit√© qu√©b√©coise. Il semblerait que pour soutenir que la Cour sup√©rieure n’a pas comp√©tence en la mati√®re, Dell devait plaider que l’arbitre qui pr√©side √† la proc√©dure d’arbitrage du NAF est une autorit√© qu√©b√©coise. C’est le seul cas o√Ļ l’on ne pourrait dire que M. Dumoulin a renonc√©, dans la clause d’arbitrage, √† la comp√©tence d’une autorit√© qu√©b√©coise.

184 Ainsi, pour d√©terminer si l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. s’applique, il faut suivant cet article nous demander si la juridiction choisie dans le contrat au moyen d’une clause d’√©lection de for ou d’arbitrage est une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise ». Si cette juridiction n’est pas une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise », l’art. 3149 entre en jeu et permet au consommateur ou au travailleur de soumettre son litige √† une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise ». Il faut donc d√©terminer ce qu’est une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise ».

185 Les intim√©s soutiennent que l’art. 3149 doit √™tre interpr√©t√© √† la lumi√®re du deuxi√®me alin√©a de l’art. 3148 qui √©tablit une distinction entre une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise », une « autorit√© √©trang√®re » et « un arbitre », de sorte qu’une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise », pour l’application de l’art. 3149, ne saurait √™tre une « autorit√© √©trang√®re » ou « un arbitre ». Cette interpr√©tation est contest√©e par l’appelante qui pr√©tend que si l’arbitrage doit avoir lieu au Qu√©bec, alors l’art. 3149 ne s’applique pas. Suivant cet argument, l’arbitrage n’est pas « international » puisqu’il a √©t√© d√©cid√© qu’il aurait lieu au Qu√©bec. Dans un tel cas, les r√®gles de droit international priv√© √©nonc√©es au livre dixi√®me du C.c.Q. ne s’appliquent pas. Cette observation soul√®ve une nouvelle question, devenue cruciale en l’esp√®ce : devant une clause d’arbitrage exclusif √† laquelle les parties ont consentie, dans quelle mesure — le cas √©ch√©ant — les faits doivent ils laisser voir des √©l√©ments « d’extran√©it√© », ou √™tre « internationaux », pour que s’appliquent les r√®gles de droit international priv√©? La question m√©rite un examen d√©taill√©.

a) La convention d’arbitrage doit elle comporter un « √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© » pour que s’appliquent les art. 3148, al. 2 et 3149 — les r√®gles de droit international priv√©?

186 Dans l’introduction de tout ouvrage de droit international priv√© (ou traitant du « conflit de lois », suivant son appellation plus courante dans les provinces de common law), on √©crit que ce domaine du droit s’applique aux litiges comportant des √©l√©ments d’extran√©it√©. Mais que signifie cette affirmation g√©n√©rale? Tout √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© suffit il pour invoquer le droit international priv√©? Afin de r√©pondre √† ces questions, il est utile d’expliquer d’abord la nature, l’objet et la structure du droit international priv√©.

187 Malgr√© ce que son nom peut laisser entendre, et l’existence d’accords internationaux touchant plusieurs de ses aspects, le droit international priv√© n’est pas international au m√™me titre que le « droit international public ». Ce ne sont pas des normes « internationales » ou universelles qui d√©cident des cas d’application des r√®gles de droit international priv√©; ces normes consistent plut√īt en des lois nationales cr√©√©es par le pouvoir judiciaire ou l√©gislatif dans un territoire donn√©. Dans son ouvrage Canadian Conflict of Laws (4e √©d. 1997), p. 4 5, J. G. Castel d√©crit la nature du conflit de lois :

[TRADUCTION] Les principes et les r√®gles du conflit de lois ne sont pas internationaux, ils ont un caract√®re essentiellement national. Puisqu’ils font partie du droit local, ils sont formul√©s par les organismes l√©gislatifs des diverses entit√©s juridiques ou sont tir√©s des d√©cisions de leurs tribunaux.

188 Essentiellement, les r√®gles de droit international priv√© ou de conflit de lois sont des lois locales destin√©es √† rem√©dier aux situations litigieuses auxquelles pourraient s’appliquer au moins deux syst√®mes juridiques. Malheureusement, comme l’a expliqu√© Collier, p. 5 6, les diff√©rentes fa√ßons de d√©signer ce domaine du droit peuvent √™tre trompeuses quant √† son objet :

[TRADUCTION] Il est d’usage courant que le domaine soit d√©sign√© sous deux appellations [« droit international priv√© » et « conflit de lois »]; cependant, celles ci sont interchangeables. Aucune n’est parfaitement exacte ni pr√©cis√©ment descriptive. L’appellation « conflit de lois » est quelque peu trompeuse puisque ce domaine vise √† √©liminer tout conflit opposant au moins deux syst√®mes juridiques (y compris le droit [interne]) ayant des pr√©tentions concurrentes √† r√©gir la question soumise au tribunal, plut√īt qu’√† engendrer un tel conflit, comme les termes peuvent sembler le sugg√©rer. Toutefois, A. V. Dicey a d√©sign√© ce domaine du droit sous cette appellation lorsqu’il a publi√© son trait√© — qui constitue la premi√®re description coh√©rente des r√®gles et principes en la mati√®re publi√©e par un avocat anglais — en 1896, et depuis, elle est pass√©e dans l’usage.

L’autre appellation, « droit international priv√© », est d’usage courant en Europe. Elle est encore plus trompeuse que ne l’est « conflit de lois » et les trois mots qui la composent appellent chacun des commentaires. « Priv√© » √©tablit une distinction entre le domaine et le « droit international public » ou le droit international, tout simplement. Ce dernier s’entend d’un ensemble de r√®gles et de principes qui r√©gissent les √Čtats et les organisations internationales dans leurs rapports entre eux. Il est administr√© par la Cour internationale de Justice, les autres tribunaux internationaux et tribunaux arbitraux, les organisations internationales et les agents √©trangers, quoique, comme il rel√®ve du droit local ou interne de l’√Čtat, il soit √©galement appliqu√© par les tribunaux d’√Čtat. Il est principalement issu des trait√©s internationaux, de la pratique des √Čtats dans leurs relations (ou coutumes) et des principes g√©n√©raux des syst√®mes juridiques internes. Le droit international priv√© traite des rapports juridiques entre les personnes physiques et morales, bien qu’il touche aussi les rapports entre les √Čtats et les gouvernements dans la mesure o√Ļ leurs rapports avec d’autres entit√©s sont r√©gies par le droit interne; √† titre d’exemple, un gouvernement qui conclut un contrat d’emprunt avec des particuliers et des soci√©t√©s. Ses sources sont les m√™mes que celles de tout autre domaine relevant du droit interne, ce qui signifie que le droit international priv√© [interne] d√©coule de la l√©gislation et des d√©cisions des tribunaux [nationaux].

« International » sert √† indiquer que le domaine touche non seulement l’application par les tribunaux [nationaux] des lois [nationales], mais √©galement des r√®gles de droit √©tranger. Le terme ne convient gu√®re, cependant, dans la mesure o√Ļ il pourrait laisser croire qu’il s’entend d’une certaine fa√ßon des rapports entre √Čtats (il convient encore moins s’il laisse croire qu’il vise les « nations » plut√īt que les √Čtats). . .

Le terme « droit » rev√™t un sens sp√©cial. L’application des r√®gles de droit international priv√© [d’un pays ou d’une province] ne permet pas en soi de statuer sur une affaire, comme c’est le cas des r√®gles du droit des contrats ou de la responsabilit√© d√©lictuelle. Dans ce sens, le droit international priv√© n’est pas du droit substantif puisque, comme nous l’avons vu, il ne s’agit que d’un ensemble de r√®gles qui d√©terminent si le tribunal [national] a comp√©tence pour entendre et trancher une affaire et, le cas √©ch√©ant, √† quel syst√®me juridique, [national] ou √©tranger, il doit recourir pour statuer sur l’affaire, ou si le jugement d’un tribunal √©tranger sera reconnu et ex√©cut√© par un tribunal [national].

189 Comme l’indique ce dernier paragraphe, les r√®gles de droit international priv√© traitent particuli√®rement des trois sujets suivants : (1) le choix de la loi applicable, (2) l’√©lection du for et (3) la reconnaissance des jugements √©trangers (voir aussi Tetley, p. 791).

190 Les r√®gles relatives au « choix de la loi applicable » visent √† d√©terminer la loi qui r√©git un litige lorsque les lois de plus d’un syst√®me juridique peuvent s’appliquer. Un exemple classique serait celui de l’accident de voiture survenu au Qu√©bec et impliquant un r√©sident de l’Ontario et un r√©sident du Qu√©bec. Les r√®gles visant √† d√©terminer lequel du droit substantif de l’Ontario ou de celui du Qu√©bec devrait r√©gir le litige (c. √† d., la r√®gle de la lex loci delicti adopt√©e dans Tolofson c. Jensen, [1994] 3 R.C.S. 1022, si les autorit√©s ontariennes sont saisies de la question, et l’art. 3126 figurant au livre dixi√®me du C.c.Q. si ce sont les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises qui en sont saisies) rel√®vent du « choix de la loi applicable » en droit international priv√©.

191 Les r√®gles relatives √† « l’√©lection du for » visent √† d√©terminer la juridiction qui conna√ģt d’un litige lorsqu’il est possible de soumettre celui ci √† plus d’une d’entre elles. Les questions que soul√®ve ce point sont en toute logique abord√©es avant celles relevant du « choix de la loi applicable ». Prenons l’exemple susmentionn√©. La question de la loi applicable n’est pas la premi√®re qu’il faut examiner. Le tribunal saisi du litige doit d’abord d√©terminer s’il peut correctement exercer sa comp√©tence. Les tribunaux albertains pourraient ils entendre le litige opposant l’automobiliste du Qu√©bec et celui de l’Ontario? Les tribunaux ontariens seraient ils mieux plac√©s pour ce faire? Voil√† le genre de questions que les r√®gles relatives √† l’« √©lection du for » aident √† trancher.

192 Les r√®gles relatives √† la « reconnaissance des jugements √©trangers » font exactement ce que leur nom sugg√®re : elles aident √† d√©terminer les cas o√Ļ les tribunaux nationaux peuvent reconna√ģtre un jugement √©tranger et y donner force de loi.

193 Il convient de faire certaines observations sur la structure g√©n√©rale des r√®gles traditionnelles de droit international priv√©. De chacun des trois points examin√©s se d√©gagent diff√©rents facteurs qui permettent de r√©soudre la question en litige. Les facteurs √† consid√©rer sont appel√©s « facteurs de rattachement ». Le professeur Tetley d√©finit les facteurs de rattachement comme √©tant les faits qui tendent √† relier une op√©ration ou une situation √† une loi ou √† un ressort donn√©. Il peut s’agir du domicile, de la r√©sidence, de la nationalit√© ou du lieu de constitution des parties, du lieu o√Ļ le contrat a √©t√© conclu ou ex√©cut√©, du lieu o√Ļ le d√©lit a √©t√© commis ou celui o√Ļ le pr√©judice qui en d√©coule a √©t√© subi, du pavillon d’un navire ou du pays o√Ļ celui ci est immatricul√©; du lieu o√Ļ le propri√©taire du navire a son centre d’op√©rations, etc. (voir Tetley, p. 41 et 195 196). Puisque les r√®gles de droit international priv√© restent des r√®gles nationales, comme nous l’avons expliqu√©, ce sont les tribunaux nationaux ou le l√©gislateur qui √©tablissent les facteurs de rattachement. De m√™me, les facteurs de rattachement applicables peuvent varier en fonction de la question de droit international priv√© √† l’√©tude. Par exemple, dans le cas du « choix de la loi applicable », les facteurs √† examiner pour d√©terminer quelle loi devrait s’appliquer √† un conflit familial peuvent √™tre diff√©rents de ceux permettant de d√©cider de la loi applicable en mati√®re d√©lictuelle ou contractuelle.

194 On affirme en g√©n√©ral que les r√®gles de droit international priv√© entrent en jeu d√®s qu’un litige pr√©sente des √©l√©ments d’extran√©it√©. Les observations qui pr√©c√®dent devraient illustrer le lien √©vident entre cette affirmation et les facteurs de rattachement qui seront pris en compte dans l’application des r√®gles de droit international priv√©. Les facteurs de rattachement sont des indicateurs des √©l√©ments d’extran√©it√© l√©galement pertinents qui peuvent emporter application des r√®gles de droit international priv√©; parmi ces facteurs, les divers domiciles, r√©sidences ou nationalit√©s des parties, le lieu d’introduction de l’instance par rapport au lieu o√Ļ le d√©lit a √©t√© commis, ou celui o√Ļ le contrat a √©t√© conclu, etc. Par exemple, la r√®gle relative au choix de la loi applicable √©nonc√©e √† l’art. 3094 C.c.Q. est ainsi r√©dig√©e :

3094. L’obligation alimentaire est r√©gie par la loi du domicile du cr√©ancier. Toutefois, lorsque le cr√©ancier ne peut obtenir d’aliments du d√©biteur en vertu de cette loi, la loi applicable est celle du domicile de ce dernier.

Cette r√®gle signifie que l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© pertinent r√©siderait dans les lieux de domicile diff√©rents du cr√©ancier et du d√©biteur de l’obligation alimentaire; une √©pouse domicili√©e au Qu√©bec et un √©poux domicili√© au Nouveau Brunswick, par exemple. Le fait que les parties puissent s’√™tre mari√©s ailleurs qu’au Qu√©bec ne serait pas un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© pertinent pour l’application de cette r√®gle. Ainsi, les √©l√©ments d’extran√©it√© ne sont pas tous pertinents. Les √©l√©ments d’extran√©it√© pertinents seront ceux que soul√®ve la r√®gle de droit international priv√© applicable.

195 Faut il toujours un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© pour que s’appliquent les r√®gles de droit international priv√©? Puisque ces derni√®res rel√®vent du droit interne, il est assur√©ment permis au l√©gislateur de formuler des r√®gles de droit international priv√© qui peuvent s’appliquer en l’absence de tout √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. Ce n’est pas comme si une loi constitutionnelle ou internationale lui interdisait d’adopter de pareilles r√®gles. Citons l’exemple de l’art. 3111 C.c.Q., qui reconna√ģt la capacit√© des parties de choisir les r√®gles qui r√©giront leurs rapports contractuels, peu importe qu’elles soient nationales ou √©trang√®res. Le premier alin√©a de l’art. 3111 pr√©voit ce qui suit :

3111. L’acte juridique, qu’il pr√©sente ou non un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, est r√©gi par la loi d√©sign√©e express√©ment dans l’acte ou dont la d√©signation r√©sulte d’une fa√ßon certaine des dispositions de cet acte.

L’objet d√©clar√© de cette r√®gle particuli√®re de droit international priv√©, qui s’applique m√™me en l’absence de tout √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©, est de respecter le principe de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties :

Le principe de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties est bien ancr√© dans la tradition juridique qu√©b√©coise et l’article propos√© le confirme.

. . . les parties peuvent choisir la loi applicable √† leur contrat non seulement lorsque celui ci pr√©sente un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© mais √©galement lorsqu’il n’en pr√©sente pas.

(Projet de loi 125 : Code civil du Québec, Commentaires détaillés sur les dispositions du projet, Livre X : Du droit international privé et disposition finale (Art. 3053 à 3144) (1991), Titre deuxième : Des conflits de lois (Art. 3059 à 3110), Chapitre troisième : Du statut des obligations (Art. 3085 à 3108), p. 53)

Comme nous l’avons expliqu√©, ce principe a fortement influenc√© la r√©daction des nouvelles r√®gles de droit international priv√© figurant au livre dixi√®me du C.c.Q. Voir Talpis, p. 189 :

[TRADUCTION] [L]e nouveau Code opte pour une conception tr√®s subjective de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties. Allant beaucoup plus loin que la Convention de Rome sur la Loi applicable aux relations contractuelles, du 19 juin 1980, et que le Code de droit international priv√© suisse du 18 d√©cembre 1987, qui ont inspir√© plusieurs r√®gles sur les obligations contractuelles, l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties au sens du nouveau Code permet sans aucune restriction de choisir la loi applicable, m√™me en l’absence d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© (art. 3111, al. 2), √† tout ou partie du contrat (art. 3111, al. 3), aux successions (art. 3098, al. 2), √† certains aspects de la responsabilit√© civile (art. 3127), et m√™me aux relations externes en mati√®re de repr√©sentation conventionnelle (art. 3116). [Nous soulignons.]

196 Cela nous am√®ne √† l’art. 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q. qui, encore selon le professeur Talpis (p. 218), permet un choix illimit√©. La question de savoir si, pour l’application de l’art. 3148, al. 2, il est n√©cessaire de prouver l’existence d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© a fait l’objet d’un certain d√©bat. Outre la pr√©sence d’une clause exclusive d’√©lection du for ou d’une clause d’arbitrage, la disposition ne fait √©tat d’aucun autre facteur dont le respect soit n√©cessaire pour son application.

197 Deux th√®ses ont √©t√© avanc√©es quant √† la question de la n√©cessit√© d’un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© pour l’application de l’art. 3148, al. 2. Selon la premi√®re, comme dans le cas de l’art. 3111 C.c.Q., le l√©gislateur aurait voulu qu’aucun √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© ne soit n√©cessaire pour son application; cette th√®se serait conforme au d√©sir de donner pr√©s√©ance √† l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties. Voir S. Rochette, « Commentaire sur la d√©cision United European Bank and Trust Nassau Ltd. c. Duchesneau — Le tribunal qu√©b√©cois doit il examiner le caract√®re abusif d’une clause d’√©lection de for incluse dans un contrat d’adh√©sion? », dans Rep√®res, EYB 2006REP504, septembre 2006, qui, au sujet des clauses d’√©lection de for, dit ceci : « [L]es articles 3111 et 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q. n’exigent nullement, pour qu’on donne effet √† une clause d’√©lection de for √©tranger, que le contrat pr√©sente un quelconque √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© ».

198 Cette th√®se s’inscrirait en outre dans la tendance globale observ√©e dans le domaine du droit international priv√© qui nous occupe — l’√©lection du for. De nos jours, o√Ļ il est reconnu que le fait de respecter les clauses de juridiction des parties favorise la stabilit√© commerciale, il est g√©n√©ralement admis que les r√®gles et les principes d’attribution de comp√©tence en droit international priv√© appartiennent √† deux cat√©gories au moins : (i) la juridiction consensuelle; et (ii) la juridiction « rattach√©e » (certains auteurs font aussi √©tat d’un troisi√®me domaine de comp√©tence potentiel, celui de la « juridiction exclusive », sur lequel il n’est pas n√©cessaire de s’attarder en l’esp√®ce) : voir J. Hill, « The Exercise of Jurisdiction in Private International Law » dans Asserting Jurisdiction : International and European Legal Perspectives (2003), p. 39; S. Guillemard et A. Prujiner, « La codification internationale du droit international priv√© : un √©chec? » (2005), 46 C. de D. 175; et G. Saumier. Les r√®gles de juridiction consensuelle permettent aux parties de d√©signer par convention la juridiction qui sera saisie de leur litige. Hill en fait la description suivante √† la p. 49 :

[TRADUCTION] Selon le principe d’acquiescement, un tribunal est comp√©tent — m√™me si les faits √† l’origine du litige et les parties n’ont aucun lien avec le forum — si les parties se soumettent volontairement √† sa comp√©tence. Cet acquiescement peut prendre la forme d’une comparution volontaire, o√Ļ la partie conteste la demande sans contester la comp√©tence du tribunal, ou d’une entente consensuelle, consistant habituellement en une clause d’√©lection de for faisant partie d’une convention plus g√©n√©rale. [Nous soulignons.]

Dans la deuxi√®me cat√©gorie, les r√®gles de la juridiction « rattach√©e » font appel √† des facteurs de rattachement qui permettent de d√©terminer si la juridiction saisie peut conna√ģtre de l’affaire. Ainsi, seule la deuxi√®me cat√©gorie de juridiction commande un examen des liens entre les faits et les territoires g√©ographiques.

199 Par ailleurs, on a soulign√© que, contrairement √† l’art. 3111, lequel pr√©cise que la disposition s’applique m√™me en l’absence d’un « √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© », l’art. 3148, al. 2 ne comporte aucune r√©serve de cet ordre et que ce silence ne devrait pas √™tre consid√©r√© comme un simple oubli. Voir S. Guillemard, « Libert√© contractuelle et rattachement juridictionnel : le droit qu√©b√©cois face aux droits fran√ßais et europ√©en », E.J.C.L., vol. 8.2, juin 2004, p. 25 26, en ligne :

Faut il, pour pouvoir d√©signer un tribunal √©tranger, que l’affaire pr√©sente intrins√®quement un caract√®re international ou la seule d√©signation d’un for √©tranger peut elle constituer l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© n√©cessaire pour rendre le litige international? . . .

Le Code civil du Qu√©bec n’offre express√©ment aucun indice pour r√©pondre √† la question, admettant simplement que les parties puissent √©lire conventionnellement un for « √† propos d’un rapport juridique d√©termin√© ». La remarque m√©rite une attention particuli√®re car le codificateur qu√©b√©cois a √©t√© plus pr√©cis en mati√®re de rattachement normatif. En effet, l’article 3111 C.c.Q. permet aux parties de d√©signer la loi applicable √† « [l]’acte juridique, qu’il pr√©sente ou non un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© ». Comment interpr√©ter le silence des articles sur la comp√©tence des tribunaux? Pierre Andr√© C√īt√©, sp√©cialiste qu√©b√©cois en mati√®re d’interpr√©tation des lois, livre l’avertissement suivant : « Si la loi est bien r√©dig√©e, il faut tenir pour suspecte une interpr√©tation qui conduirait [. . .] √† ajouter des termes ». Il rappelle la recommandation de Lord Mersey : « C’est une chose grave d’introduire dans une loi des mots qui n’y sont pas et sauf n√©cessit√© √©vidente, c’est une chose √† √©viter ». Autrement dit, si, selon l’adage, le l√©gislateur « ne parle pas pour ne rien dire », il ne se tait certainement pas sans raison. Comme la comparaison des deux articles, sur le choix de loi et sur l’√©lection de for, laisse perplexe en raison de la pr√©cision de l’un et du silence de l’autre, force est de conclure que l’√©lection de for n’est autoris√©e en droit qu√©b√©cois que dans le cadre d’une affaire comportant un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. [Renvois omis.]

L’auteure poursuit en posant toutefois l’hypoth√®se que la clause d’√©lection de for puisse en soi constituer l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© requis, expliquant que toute autre conclusion contreviendrait au principe de la primaut√© de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties :

Se pourrait il que la seule d√©signation des parties en faveur du tribunal d’un √Čtat par ailleurs totalement √©tranger au contrat ne constitue pas un lien suffisamment important?
(. . .)
Nous pensons qu’obliger √† ce que l’un des √©l√©ments du dossier soit « objectivement » √©tranger va √† l’encontre du principe de la libert√© contractuelle. Selon nous, c’est concevoir le rattachement juridictionnel dans le seul cadre, pour ne pas dire carcan, des √©l√©ments propres au contrat, comme le font d’autres facteurs de rattachement en la mati√®re. En outre, le raisonnement manque de logique. Nous avons vu que g√©n√©ralement, on n’exige aucun lien entre le tribunal saisi et le contrat autrement qualifi√© d’international. [p. 26 et 28]

Guillemard reconna√ģt de m√™me la possibilit√© d’arriver √† la m√™me conclusion √† l’√©gard des clauses d’arbitrage :

[N]ous avons constat√© qu’en ce qui concerne l’√©lection de for, en droit qu√©b√©cois au moins, l’internationalit√© « artificielle » qui ne r√©sulte que du fait de l’appartenance de l’autorit√© √† un autre ordre juridique, ne semble pas totalement exclue. Il nous semble illogique qu’il n’en soit pas de m√™me dans la sph√®re de l’arbitrage. [p. 50]

200 √Ä notre avis, l’id√©e que les clauses d’√©lection du for et d’arbitrage constituent en soi l’√©l√©ment d’extran√©it√© requis, de sorte que leur seule pr√©sence emporte application de l’art. 3148, al. 2, semble tr√®s logique. Les clauses d’√©lection du for auront pour cons√©quence de d√©poss√©der les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises de leur comp√©tence pour entendre l’affaire afin que celle ci soit renvoy√©e dans un autre pays ou une autre province et soit tranch√©e suivant les lois de ce ressort. De m√™me, les clauses d’arbitrage exclusif ont pour cons√©quence de cr√©er une « juridiction priv√©e », qui fait perdre aux autorit√©s d√©sign√©es par l’√Čtat, telles que les tribunaux nationaux et administratifs, leur comp√©tence pour r√©gler le litige.

201 Nous ne voyons aucun fondement rationnel nous permettant d’√©tablir une distinction entre la clause d’√©lection du for et la clause d’arbitrage pour d√©terminer si elles constituent en soi un √©l√©ment d’extran√©it√©. Le fait que l’arbitrage contractuel puisse se d√©rouler sur le territoire du Qu√©bec n’est en rien d√©terminant √† cet √©gard. Les deux clauses ont, d’abord et avant tout, pour effet de d√©roger au principe de la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises et d’attribuer la comp√©tence √† une autre entit√©. Il nous semble que les r√®gles figurant au titre troisi√®me du livre dixi√®me du C.c.Q. traitent davantage de la « comp√©tence » au sens de pouvoirs judiciaires et quasi judiciaires que de la « comp√©tence » au sens g√©ographique du terme (bien que ces notions puissent manifestement se chevaucher). La comp√©tence peut prendre des sens diff√©rents en fonction du contexte. Dans Lipohar c. The Queen (1999), 200 C.L.R. 485, [1999] HCA 65, p. 516, √† propos du terme « comp√©tence », on a dit : [TRADUCTION] « [i]l est utilis√© dans une vari√©t√© de sens, certains touchant √† la g√©ographie, certains aux personnes et aux proc√©dures et d’autres aux structures et aux pouvoirs constitutionnels et judiciaires. »

202 Le fait que le titre troisi√®me s’intitule « De la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec » n’appelle pas, √† notre avis, une autre conclusion. Selon nous, l’emploi des termes « comp√©tence internationale » ne laissent pas n√©cessairement sous entendre que les questions de comp√©tence ne se posent que dans un contexte d’extra territorialit√© g√©ographique. Les proc√©dures d’arbitrage priv√©, m√™me celles ayant lieu au Qu√©bec, √©chappent tout autant aux syst√®mes judiciaires et quasi judiciaires qu√©b√©cois — et, partant, sont « internationales » — que les instances judiciaires se d√©roulant dans une autre province ou dans un autre pays. Il faut √©viter d’accorder trop d’importance √† l’emploi du terme « international » au titre troisi√®me pour les m√™mes raisons que l’on ne devrait pas se laisser induire en erreur par ce m√™me terme dans l’expression « droit international priv√© ». D’ailleurs, les versions pr√©c√©dentes du titre troisi√®me s’intitulaient « Des conflits de juridiction » (voir J. A. Talpis et G. Goldstein, « Analyse critique de l’avant projet de loi du Qu√©bec en droit international priv√© » (1988), 91 R. du N. 606, p. 608). De m√™me, l’intitul√© « De la comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s du Qu√©bec » n’est peut √™tre pas appropri√© puisque les autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises doivent exercer leur comp√©tence juridictionnelle √† l’int√©rieur des limites territoriales de la province — d’o√Ļ la conclusion de l’arr√™tMorguard Properties Ltd. c. Ville de Winnipeg, [1983] 2 R.C.S. 493, selon laquelle la constitutionnalit√© des d√©clarations de comp√©tence √† l’√©gard d’un litige d√©pend de l’existence d’un lien r√©el et substantiel avec la province.

203 En dernier lieu, il importe de signaler que, contrairement √† plusieurs autres provinces, le Qu√©bec a adopt√© des r√®gles d’arbitrage qui ne font aucune distinction entre l’arbitrage national et l’arbitrage international. Le livre du C.p.c. qui traite de l’arbitrage touche tant l’arbitrage « national » que l’arbitrage « international »; les r√®gles sont essentiellement identiques. Cette approche visait √† d√©montrer une attitude de respect du choix des parties de recourir √† l’arbitrage. Les provinces de common law font certaines distinctions entre l’arbitrage « national » et l’arbitrage « international » au regard de l’intervention du tribunal et de la reconnaissance des sentences arbitrales. La tendance semble indiquer un encadrement plus serr√© de l’intervention judiciaire dans les arbitrages « internationaux » que dans les arbitrages « nationaux ». Les tribunaux ont plus de latitude pour intervenir et entendre les arbitrages nationaux. (Il serait √©trange que, devant cette tendance, la Cour interpr√®te le droit qu√©b√©cois de fa√ßon √† ne permettre une plus grande intervention judiciaire que dans les arbitrages « internationaux ».) Si le Qu√©bec ne fait aucune distinction dans ses r√®gles du C.p.c., il serait logique de ne pas en faire pour l’application du livre dixi√®me du C.c.Q. Cela s’av√®re particuli√®rement vrai lorsqu’il semble que la seule raison pour laquelle le mot « arbitre » est inclus dans l’art. 3148, al. 2 (qui reproduit essentiellement les effets de l’art. 940.1 C.p.c.) √©tait de permettre d’appliquer les exceptions de l’art. 3148, al. 2 aux dispositions des art. 3149 √† 3151.

204 Pour ces motifs, nous concluons que la clause d’arbitrage suffit en soi √† d√©clencher l’application de l’art. 3148, al. 2, et par le fait m√™me, de ses exceptions, notamment l’art. 3149.

b) L’arr√™t de la Cour d’appel du Qu√©bec dans Dominion Bridge

205 L’appelante a invoqu√© l’arr√™t Dominion Bridge √† l’appui de sa th√®se. Dans cette affaire, la Cour d’appel a, dans une remarque incidente, donn√© √† l’art. 3149 une interpr√©tation qui permettait aux travailleurs ou aux consommateurs de se soumettre √† l’arbitrage au moyen d’une clause d’arbitrage exclusif, pourvu que l’arbitrage ait lieu dans la province de Qu√©bec. Depuis, les tribunaux qu√©b√©cois s’y conforment, y compris la juge Lemelin de la Cour d’appel, bien que la sagesse de ce pr√©c√©dent ait √©t√© remise en question : voir G. Goldstein et E. Groffier, Droit international priv√© (2003), t. II, R√®gles sp√©cifiques, p. 640.

206 Il est clair que l’arr√™t Dominion Bridge repose sur la conviction erron√©e que le l√©gislateur voulait, par l’adoption de l’art. 3149, prot√©ger les consommateurs et les travailleurs contre le d√©placement de leurs litiges √† l’ext√©rieur du Qu√©bec. En expliquant le fondement de sa conclusion, le juge Beauregard √©met l’hypoth√®se suivante : « [l]a protection du droit du travailleur de poursuivre son employeur au Qu√©bec √©tait probablement l’intention principale du l√©gislateur » (p. 324). En fait, l’examen des commentaires formul√©s par le ministre de la Justice lors de l’adoption de cette disposition r√©v√®le que le l√©gislateur avait l’intention de prot√©ger l’acc√®s des consommateurs et des travailleurs aux tribunaux qu√©b√©cois et aux autres organismes de r√®glement des diff√©rends d√©sign√©s par l’√Čtat, et pas simplement de conserver ces diff√©rends dans les limites g√©ographiques du Qu√©bec. Voici ses commentaires au sujet de l’art. 3149 :

Cet article, de droit nouveau, s’inspire de la Loi f√©d√©rale sur le droit international priv√© suisse de 1987, ainsi que du troisi√®me alin√©a de l’article 85 C.c.B.C. Il attribue une comp√©tence en mati√®re de contrat de consommation ou de travail aux autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises du domicile ou de la r√©sidence du consommateur ou du travailleur; cette comp√©tence s’ajoute √† celle fond√©e sur les crit√®res pr√©vus √† l’article 3148.

L’article assure une protection accrue aux consommateurs et aux travailleurs.
(Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, t. II, p. 2010-2011)

207 Il est utile d’examiner les dispositions qui auraient inspir√© l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. L’article 85 C.c.B.C. pr√©voit ce qui suit :

85. Lorsque les parties à un acte y ont fait, pour son exécution, élection de domicile dans un autre lieu que celui du domicile réel, les significations, demandes et poursuites qui y sont relatives, peuvent être faites au domicile convenu et devant le juge de ce domicile.
(. . .)
Except√© dans un acte notari√©, l’√©lection de domicile est sans valeur quant √† la juridiction des tribunaux, si elle est sign√©e par un non commer√ßant dans les limites du district o√Ļ il a sa r√©sidence.

208 Puis, l’art. 114 de la loi suisse sur le droit international priv√© (Loi f√©d√©rale sur le droit international priv√© (18 d√©cembre 1987), RO 1988 1776) dispose :

Art. 114 Contrats conclus avec des consommateurs

1. Dans les contrats qui r√©pondent aux conditions √©nonc√©es par l’art. 120, al. 1, l’action intent√©e par un consommateur peut √™tre port√©e, au choix de ce dernier, devant le tribunal suisse;

a. de son domicile ou de sa résidence habituelle, ou

b. du domicile ou, à défaut de domicile, de la résidence habituelle du fournisseur.

2. Le consommateur ne peut pas renoncer d’avance au for de son domicile ou de sa r√©sidence habituelle.

209 Les deux dispositions r√©servent express√©ment la comp√©tence des tribunaux d’entendre les litiges de consommation. De m√™me, il faut remarquer les commentaires du ministre de la Justice relatifs aux art. 3117 et 3118, les r√®gles visant √©galement √† prot√©ger le consommateur et le travailleur pour ce qui est du choix de la loi applicable, qui se terminent respectivement par les d√©clarations suivantes :

On rappellera que le contrat de consommation est d√©fini √† l’article 1384 et que l’article 3149 donne comp√©tence aux tribunaux qu√©b√©cois en certaines circonstances quand il s’agit de contrat de consommation.
(. . .)
On notera √©galement ici que l’article 3149 donne comp√©tence aux tribunaux qu√©b√©cois, en certaines circonstances, quand il s’agit de contrat de travail. [Nous soulignons.]
(Commentaires du ministre de la Justice, t. II, p. 1987 1988)

210 Il semble, d’apr√®s ce qui pr√©c√®de, que le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois avait l’intention de prot√©ger l’acc√®s des consommateurs et des travailleurs aux tribunaux. Il est int√©ressant de noter que dans une d√©cision plus r√©cente, Rees c. Convergia, [2005] J.Q. no 3248 (QL), 2005 QCCA 353, la Cour d’appel semble reconna√ģtre que tel √©tait l’objet de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. : « De toute √©vidence, le l√©gislateur a voulu, √† l’article 3149 C.c.Q., l√©gif√©rer sur la comp√©tence des tribunaux qu√©b√©cois de mani√®re autonome et compl√®te dans deux secteurs de l’activit√© √©conomique o√Ļ l’une des parties contractantes est particuli√®rement vuln√©rable » (par. 37 (nous soulignons)).

211 L’interpr√©tation de l’art. 3149 retenue dans Dominion Bridge pose un autre probl√®me en ce qu’elle confond pour l’essentiel l’arbitre consensuel si√©geant au Qu√©bec avec une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise ». Dans la plupart des cas, l’application de cette notion r√©v√®le les failles de cette interpr√©tation. Supposer que le fait, pour un d√©cideur, de si√©ger au Qu√©bec suffit √† faire de lui une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » ne tient pas compte de la question de savoir si l’arbitre doit provenir du Qu√©bec. En l’esp√®ce, suivant notre interpr√©tation des dispositions du Code NAF relatives √† la d√©signation des arbitres, les r√®gles 20 √† 24, rien ne garantit que l’arbitre proviendra du m√™me endroit que le plaignant. Si les parties ne parviennent pas √† s’entendre sur le choix d’un arbitre, le NAF le choisit apr√®s avoir autoris√© chaque partie √† rayer le nom d’un candidat de la liste restreinte. Seule la r√®gle 21E √©voque le lieu d’origine de l’arbitre. Elle est r√©dig√©e comme suit :

[TRADUCTION]
E. Sauf entente contraire des parties, dans les cas mettant en cause des citoyens de pays diff√©rents, le Forum peut d√©signer un arbitre ou un candidat arbitre en tenant compte, notamment, de la nationalit√© et du lieu de r√©sidence de l’arbitre ou du candidat, mais il ne peut exclure un arbitre du seul fait qu’il est citoyen du m√™me pays que l’une des parties.

Il serait pour le moins √©tonnant que l’on puisse qualifier d’« autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » un arbitre qui, m√™me s’il se trouve au Qu√©bec, n’est pas citoyen du Qu√©bec.

212 Cette interpr√©tation fait √©galement abstraction d’une autre question importante : d’o√Ļ l’arbitre tient il sa comp√©tence? En l’esp√®ce, l’arbitre et la proc√©dure d’arbitrage √©tablie par le NAF rel√®vent ultimement du droit am√©ricain. Signalons √† cet √©gard la r√®gle 5O du Code NAF qui pr√©cise que [TRADUCTION] « [l]es arbitrages en vertu du Code sont r√©gis par la Federal Arbitration Act conform√©ment √† la r√®gle 48B ». Selon la r√®gle 48B, [TRADUCTION] « [s]auf entente contraire des parties, toute convention d’arbitrage vis√©e aux r√®gles 1 et 2E, de m√™me que toute proc√©dure d’arbitrage, audience, sentence et ordonnance sont r√©gies par la Federal Arbitration Act, 9 U.S.C. §§ 1 16 ». Aucun arbitre li√© par le droit am√©ricain ne saurait √™tre qualifi√© d’« autorit√© qu√©b√©coise ». Les intim√©s soul√®vent √©galement √† bon droit le fait que suivant la r√®gle 11D, tous les arbitrages se d√©rouleront en anglais. On pourrait penser qu’une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » serait tenue d’offrir ses services d’arbitrage en fran√ßais. Enfin, il nous semble tout √† fait incongru qu’en l’esp√®ce, le consommateur doive d’abord communiquer avec une institution am√©ricaine, situ√©e √† Minneapolis et responsable de l’organisation de l’arbitrage, afin d’entamer le processus visant √† attribuer √† la soi disant « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » la comp√©tence n√©cessaire pour entendre le litige.

213 Il convient √©galement de souligner que le fait d’accorder le statut d’« autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » √† un arbitre consensuel si√©geant au Qu√©bec entra√ģnerait des cons√©quences non d√©sir√©es pour l’application des autres exceptions √† l’art. 3148, al. 2 C.c.Q., en particulier de l’art. 3151 C.c.Q. En conf√©rant aux « autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises » le pouvoir exclusif d’entendre toute action fond√©e sur « la responsabilit√© civile pour tout pr√©judice subi au Qu√©bec ou hors du Qu√©bec et r√©sultant soit de l’exposition √† une mati√®re premi√®re [. . .], soit de son utilisation », le l√©gislateur n’a s√Ľrement pas voulu que les parties puissent choisir √† l’avance les arbitres priv√©s charg√©s de r√©gler les litiges de cette nature. Cette intention ressort clairement de la version ant√©rieure de cette disposition, l’art. 21.1 C.p.c., sanctionn√© le 21 juin 1989, qui conf√®re aux tribunaux qu√©b√©cois le pouvoir exclusif d’entendre les litiges portant sur une mati√®re premi√®re :

Code civil du Bas Canada

8.1 Les r√®gles du pr√©sent Code s’appliquent de fa√ßon imp√©rative √† la responsabilit√© de tout dommage subi au Qu√©bec ou hors du Qu√©bec et r√©sultant de l’exposition √† une mati√®re premi√®re qui tire son origine du Qu√©bec ou de son utilisation, que cette mati√®re premi√®re ait √©t√© trait√©e ou non.

Code de procédure civile

21.1 Les tribunaux du Qu√©bec ont juridiction exclusive pour conna√ģtre en premi√®re instance de toute demande ou de toute action fond√©e sur la responsabilit√© pr√©vue √† l’article 8.1 du Code civil du Bas Canada.

En présentant ces dispositions, le ministre de la Justice a fait les déclarations suivantes :

M. le Président, le projet de loi vise à rendre obligatoires également pour les étrangers les règles de droit du Québec applicables en certaines matières.
(. . .)
Puisque le dommage dont il s’agit r√©sulte de l’utilisation ou de l’exposition √† une mati√®re premi√®re qui tire son origine du Qu√©bec, il est apparu important que tous les justiciables, qu’ils soient qu√©b√©cois, canadiens ou √©trangers, soient plac√©s sur un pied d’√©galit√© et b√©n√©ficient de l’application d’un seul et m√™me r√©gime juridique de responsabilit√©, soit celui du Qu√©bec.

(Québec, Assemblée nationale, Journal des débats, vol. 30, no 134, 2e sess., 33e lég., 21 juin 1989, p. 6941 et 6970)

Il est clair qu’en introduisant ces dispositions, l’Assembl√©e nationale voulait que toutes les parties concern√©es par un litige en cette mati√®re soient assujetties √† un seul syst√®me juridique — celui du Qu√©bec — qui, de toute √©vidence comprend les tribunaux qu√©b√©cois.

c) Conclusion sur l’interpr√©tation de l’art. 3149

214 Comme nous l’avons indiqu√© au d√©but de cette section, l’application de l’art. 3149 est li√©e √† la question de savoir « ce qu’est une autorit√© qu√©b√©coise ». Elle d√©pend, selon nous, de cette seule question. Il ressort de l’analyse qui pr√©c√®de qu’une « autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » doit s’entendre du d√©cideur situ√© au Qu√©bec qui tient sa comp√©tence du droit qu√©b√©cois. Cette d√©finition est compatible avec celle dont il est question dans la doctrine qu√©b√©coise. Dans Droit international priv√© qu√©b√©cois (2e √©d. 2006), C. Emanuelli inclut dans la d√©finition de cette expression : « [l]es tribunaux du Qu√©bec, [le] notaire qu√©b√©cois ou d’autres autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises : directeur de la protection de la jeunesse, directeur de l’√©tat civil, etc. » (p. 70). H. P. Glenn note qu’« [e]n parlant simplement des “autorit√©s du Qu√©bec”, sans autre pr√©cision, le troisi√®me Titre √©tablit les crit√®res de comp√©tence internationale des autorit√©s judiciaires et administratives du Qu√©bec » (« Droit international priv√© », dans La r√©forme du Code civil (1993), t. 3, 669, p. 743 (nous soulignons)). Voir √©galement G. Goldstein et E. Groffier qui affirment ce qui suit : « [l]e nouveau Code parle des “autorit√©s” qu√©b√©coises ou √©trang√®res plut√īt que des tribunaux. Il veut inclure les autorit√©s administratives dont les d√©cisions peuvent concerner le droit priv√© [. . .] Par contre, il ne semble pas que les tribunaux arbitraux (non √©tatiques) soient consid√©r√©s comme des « autorit√©s » aux fins de ce Code » (Droit international priv√©, t. I, Th√©orie g√©n√©rale, p. 287). Tous ces commentaires s’accordent enti√®rement avec la distinction qu’√©tablit l’art. 3148, al. 2 entre les « autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises », les « autorit√©s √©trang√®res » et les « arbitres ».

215 Bien que l’interpr√©tation de l’art. 3149 n’ait gu√®re √©t√© comment√©e, notre position re√ßoit l’appui des auteurs. Dans son article « Commentaire sur la d√©cision Dell Computer Corporation c. Union des consommateurs — Quand “browsewrap” rime avec “arbitrabilit√©” », dans Rep√®res, EYB 2005REP375, ao√Ľt 2005, N. W. Vermeys affirme :

En effet, l’article 3148 C.c.Q. semble √©carter tout recours forc√© √† l’arbitrage dans le cadre de contrats de consommation [. . .] Il r√©sulte de cet article que la notion d’« autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » exclut express√©ment celle d’« arbitre ». Or, puisqu’en vertu du Code le consommateur ne peut renoncer √† la comp√©tence des autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises, la clause d’arbitrage lui serait n√©cessairement inopposable.

M. Vermeys rejette en outre l’argument voulant qu’un arbitre puisse √™tre vis√© par le terme « tribunal » figurant dans la L.p.c., art. 271, al. 3, et qu’il puisse pr√©tendre ainsi √† la qualit√© d’« autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » pour l’application des art. 3148 et 3149 :

√Ä cette fin, notons que certains pourraient √™tre tent√©s de pr√©tendre que la d√©finition de « tribunal » incorpor√©e dans la LPC inclut celle d’arbitre. Cependant, il demeure qu’une interpr√©tation aussi large du terme « tribunaux » ne semble pas conforme √† l’√©tat actuel du droit. En effet, comme l’a tr√®s justement indiqu√© la Cour [d’appel], « la loi [sur la protection du consommateur] ne d√©finit pas ce terme, il faut s’en remettre √† l’article 4 C.p.c. : « « tribunal » : une des cours de justice √©num√©r√©es √† l’article 22 ou un juge qui si√®ge en salle d’audience ». » (Par. 51 de la d√©cision comment√©e) [. . .] avant m√™me d’aller consulter le Code de proc√©dure civile, il importe de s’assurer de la coh√©rence interne du texte de loi. Or, plusieurs articles de cette loi, notamment les articles 142, 143, 267 et 271, impliquent vraisemblablement que seuls les tribunaux au sens du Code de proc√©dure civile ont √©t√© envisag√©s par le l√©gislateur lors de la r√©daction de la LPC. [Note no 20]

216 Tout cela nous am√®ne √† conclure qu’un arbitre consensuel ne saurait √™tre qualifi√© d’« autorit√© qu√©b√©coise » pour l’application de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. Par cons√©quent, Dell ne peut avoir gain de cause en l’esp√®ce en tentant d’opposer √† M. Dumoulin la clause d’arbitrage exclusif. Cette interpr√©tation n’a aucune incidence sur les arbitres du travail, ni sur les autres types d’arbitres vis√©s par les lois du Qu√©bec, ceux ci r√©pondant √† la d√©finition d’« autorit√©s qu√©b√©coises » : voir Tremblay, p. 252 : « [i]l faut aussi distinguer l’arbitrage civil ou commercial d’autres types d’arbitrage, tel l’arbitrage de griefs en droit du travail. Dans ce dernier type d’arbitrage, bien que le tiers puisse √™tre choisi par les parties, l’arbitrage est obligatoire selon la loi » (nous soulignons). Cela explique pourquoi les d√©cisions de la Cour dans Bisaillon et Desputeaux ne dictent pas notre conclusion en l’esp√®ce. La premi√®re de ces d√©cisions mettait en cause un arbitre qui tirait ses pouvoirs du Code du travail du Qu√©bec et la seconde, un arbitre d√©sign√© conform√©ment √† l’art. 37 de la Loi sur le statut professionnel des artistes des arts visuels, des m√©tiers d’art et de la litt√©rature et sur leurs contrats avec les diffuseurs. Notre interpr√©tation ne signifie pas non plus que les clauses d’arbitrage contenues dans les contrats de consommation et de travail sont toujours invalides. Elle signifie simplement que la convention d’arbitrage ant√©rieure au litige, cons√©quence d’une clause d’arbitrage contenue dans un contrat d’adh√©sion, ne peut √™tre oppos√©e au consommateur ou au travailleur. Le consommateur ou le travailleur pourrait bien choisir d’aller en arbitrage, auquel cas le recours √† l’art. 3149 est inutile. Goldstein et Groffier l’expliquent tr√®s bien :

Tout ce que dit l’article 3149 C.c.Q., c’est que le cocontractant de la partie faible ne peut lui imposer une telle clause, malgr√© sa volont√© et peut √™tre m√™me [. . .] malgr√© le fait que cette derni√®re s’est pr√©value de l’arbitrage, mais change d’avis. S’il est exact qu’un travailleur ou un consommateur ne peut renoncer √† l’avance au for de son domicile ou de sa r√©sidence, n√©anmoins, il lui est loisible de le faire s’il y trouve son int√©r√™t au vu des circonstances. Affirmer le contraire revient √† consid√©rer, en situation internationale, que tout ce qui concerne le contrat de travail ou celui de consommation n’est pas arbitrable. [En italique dans l’original.]
(Droit international privé, t. II, p. 640)

217 Notre conclusion sur l’art. 3149 C.c.Q. suffit √† elle seule √† rejeter la demande de l’appelante de renvoyer le litige √† l’arbitrage; il n’est donc pas strictement n√©cessaire d’examiner les autres motifs possibles de nullit√© de la convention d’arbitrage. Cela dit, nous estimons que les autres questions soulev√©es par le pr√©sent pourvoi sont suffisamment importantes pour que notre Cour exprime son opinion sur leur bien fond√© respectif.

(2) La convention d’arbitrage est elle nulle parce qu’un litige de consommation rel√®ve de l’ordre public?

218 Bien que les intim√©s n’aient pas express√©ment soutenu qu’un litige de consommation ne pourrait jamais √™tre soumis √† l’arbitrage parce qu’il s’agirait d’un arbitrage sur une question qui int√©resse l’ordre public, nous devons exposer bri√®vement notre opinion sur le sujet car la Cour d’appel a abord√© la question. Nous estimons que la Cour d’appel a conclu √† bon droit qu’un litige de consommation peut √™tre soumis √† l’arbitrage. Cette conclusion d√©coule in√©vitablement de l’application du raisonnement que nous avons adopt√© dans Desputeaux et elle est conforme aux conditions d’ordre public, sous r√©serve de l’effet de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q.

219 L’article 2639 C.c.Q. traite du genre de diff√©rend qui ne peut √™tre soumis √† l’arbitrage. Il s’agit du « diff√©rend portant sur l’√©tat et la capacit√© des personnes, sur les mati√®res familiales ou sur les autres questions qui int√©ressent l’ordre public ». La question est donc de savoir si un litige de consommation est une de ces autres questions qui int√©ressent l’ordre public. Nous croyons que tel n’est pas le cas. Comme en a d√©cid√© la Cour dans Desputeaux, le concept d’ordre public √† l’art. 2639, al. 1 C.c.Q. doit √™tre interpr√©t√© strictement de fa√ßon √† respecter l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties de recourir √† l’arbitrage, de m√™me que l’intention claire du l√©gislateur de respecter ce choix. De la m√™me fa√ßon qu’aucune raison imp√©rieuse ne nous permettait d’√©tablir une analogie entre les litiges relevant du droit d’auteur et ceux portant sur l’√©tat et la capacit√© des personnes ou sur les mati√®res familiales dans Desputeaux, rien ne nous permet de traiter diff√©remment les litiges de consommation en l’esp√®ce.

220 En outre, le fait que certaines des r√®gles de la L.p.c. que l’arbitre devrait appliquer pr√©sentent un caract√®re d’ordre public n’emp√™che en rien un tribunal arbitral d’instruire l’affaire. C’est ce qu’√©dicte clairement le deuxi√®me alin√©a de l’art. 2639 C.c.Q. C’est aussi ce que la Cour a reconnu dans Desputeaux :

L’interpr√©tation extensive du concept d’ordre public de l’art. 2639, al. 1 C.c.Q. a √©t√© express√©ment √©cart√©e par le l√©gislateur. Celui ci a ainsi pr√©cis√© que le fait que les r√®gles appliqu√©es par l’arbitre pr√©sentent un caract√®re d’ordre public n’emp√™che pas la convention d’arbitrage (art. 2639, al. 2 C.c.Q.). L’adoption de l’art. 2639, al. 2 C.c.Q. visait clairement √† √©carter un courant jurisprudentiel ant√©rieur qui soustrayait √† la comp√©tence arbitrale toute question relevant de l’ordre public. (Voir Condominiums Mont St Sauveur inc. c. Constructions Serge Sauv√© lt√©e, [1990] R.J.Q. 2783, p. 2789, o√Ļ la Cour d’appel du Qu√©bec a d’ailleurs exprim√© son d√©saccord avec l’arr√™t ant√©rieur rendu dans Procon (Great Britain) Ltd. c. Golden Eagle Co., [1976] C.A. 565; voir aussi Mousseau [c. Soci√©t√© de gestion Paquin lt√©e, [1994] R.J.Q. 2004 (C.S.)], p. 2009.) Sauf dans quelques mati√®res fondamentales, tenant par exemple strictement √† l’√©tat des personnes, comme l’a conclu par exemple la Cour sup√©rieure du Qu√©bec dans l’affaire Mousseau, pr√©cit√©e, l’arbitre peut statuer sur des r√®gles d’ordre public, puisqu’elles peuvent faire l’objet de la convention d’arbitrage. L’arbitre n’est pas condamn√© √† interrompre ses travaux d√®s qu’une question susceptible d’√™tre qualifi√©e de r√®gle ou de principe d’ordre public se pose dans le cours de l’arbitrage. [par. 53]

221 Enfin, le silence de la L.p.c. et du C.c.Q. quant √† l’arbitrabilit√© d’un litige de consommation tend √† indiquer que l’arbitrage est permis. Aucune loi ne devrait √™tre interpr√©t√©e comme excluant le recours √† l’arbitrage, sauf s’il est clair que telle √©tait l’intention du l√©gislateur. Aucune disposition de la L.p.c. et du C.c.Q. ne nous am√®ne √† penser que c’est le cas des litiges de consommation. Plus particuli√®rement, nous croyons que la Cour d’appel a eu raison de conclure que l’art. 271, al. 3 L.p.c. ne fait que d√©finir la comp√©tence mat√©rielle des tribunaux et, comme nous l’avons fait dans Desputeaux, qu’une telle disposition ne devrait pas √™tre interpr√©t√©e comme excluant la possibilit√© du recours √† la proc√©dure arbitrale.

222 Le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois n’a jamais indiqu√© clairement que les litiges de consommation ne sont pas arbitrables. Nous n’avons trouv√© aucune r√®gle g√©n√©rale en ce sens. Le l√©gislateur a adopt√© une autre approche. Le C.c.Q. et la L.p.c. contiennent certaines dispositions r√©gissant la validit√©, l’applicabilit√© et l’ex√©cution des conventions d’arbitrage mettant en cause des consommateurs.

223 Les intim√©s semblent pr√©tendre qu’un litige de consommation ne peut jamais √™tre soumis √† l’arbitrage parce que cette proc√©dure devrait √™tre consid√©r√©e fonci√®rement in√©quitable pour le consommateur. Nous ne sommes pas convaincus que ce soit le cas. Au contraire, nous croyons qu’il pourrait en fait √™tre appropri√© ou pr√©f√©rable, dans certaines circonstances, de recourir √† l’arbitrage pour r√©gler les litiges de consommation.

(3) La convention d’arbitrage est elle nulle parce qu’elle constitue une renonciation, contraire √† l’ordre public, √† la comp√©tence de la Cour sup√©rieure en mati√®re de recours collectifs?

224 Les intim√©s soutiennent aussi que l’acc√®s aux recours collectifs int√©resse l’ordre public et que, par cons√©quent, cette question ne saurait √™tre soumise √† l’arbitrage suivant l’art. 2639. Cet argument doit √™tre rejet√© parce que, comme nous l’avons mentionn√©, l’art. 2639, al. 1 ne vise √† soustraire √† l’arbitrage que certains types de « questions » ou de diff√©rends qui int√©ressent l’ordre public. L’acc√®s aux recours collectifs est un droit proc√©dural et non un genre de « questions » ou de diff√©rends semblables √† ceux qui int√©ressent l’√©tat et la capacit√© des personnes ou les conflits familiaux.

225 Subsidiairement, les intim√©s soutiennent que la Cour devrait appliquer son arr√™t Garcia Transport Lt√©e c. Cie Trust Royal, [1992] 2 R.C.S. 499, et conclure que les r√®gles relatives aux recours collectifs sont d’ordre public et, partant, que les dispositions contractuelles ayant pour effet d’emp√™cher le consommateur d’acc√©der aux recours collectifs sont inop√©rantes. Dans l’arr√™t Garcia Transport, la Cour a conclu qu’une disposition du C.c.B.C. avait un caract√®re d’ordre public m√™me si elle ne contenait aucune mention expresse en ce sens. Concluant que ce caract√®re pouvait √™tre implicite, la Cour a √©num√©r√© un certain nombre de facteurs indiquant que le l√©gislateur voulait conf√©rer ce caract√®re √† la disposition. La d√©cision ne laisse cependant subsister aucun doute quant au fait que c’est le l√©gislateur qu√©b√©cois qui d√©termine quelles lois rel√®vent de l’ordre public, non pas les tribunaux. Le r√īle des tribunaux √† cet √©gard consiste √† d√©terminer si l’intention du l√©gislateur est suffisamment claire pour conclure qu’il entendait conf√©rer √† une loi un caract√®re d’ordre public, ce qui n’arrivera que dans les rares cas o√Ļ le l√©gislateur aura √©t√© moins qu’explicite √† ce sujet. L’extrait suivant, tir√© de l’ouvrage de J. L. Baudouin, Les obligations (3e √©d. 1989), p. 81, cit√© dans Garcia Transport, p. 525, exprime avec exactitude le droit en vigueur :

La plupart du temps, c’est le l√©gislateur qui intervient directement pour dire ce qui est d’ordre public. Parfois on trouve dans le texte l√©gislatif ou r√©glementaire m√™me la mention expresse que la disposition pr√©vue par lui est d’ordre public; parfois il indique qu’il ne souffrira aucune d√©rogation contractuelle √† la r√®gle, √† peine de nullit√©. Parfois le l√©gislateur, au contraire, indique clairement qu’il laisse aux parties elles m√™mes le soin de r√©gler la question et que la r√®gle qu’il √©dicte ne s’appliquera qu’√† titre suppl√©tif [. . .] Dans d’autres esp√®ces enfin, la formulation utilis√©e ne laisse pas directement soup√ßonner le caract√®re v√©ritablement imp√©ratif de la loi. Les tribunaux ont alors la t√Ęche de rechercher l’intention l√©gislative et de d√©cider s’il convient de donner aux textes un caract√®re d’ordre public, c’est √† dire de d√©terminer s’il s’agit d’une disposition imp√©rativeou seulement suppl√©tive de volont√©. [En italique dans l’original.]

226 En l’esp√®ce, rien n’indique que le l√©gislateur entendait donner un caract√®re d’ordre public aux r√®gles figurant au livre IX concernant « Le recours collectif ». M√™me si l’art. 1051 C.p.c. pr√©voit que les dispositions des autres livres du C.p.c. qui sont incompatibles avec le livre IX ne s’appliquent pas, cette r√®gle ne vise qu’√† rem√©dier aux difficult√©s pratiques que pose l’application de proc√©dures qui auraient √©t√© impossibles dans le contexte des recours collectifs, par exemple l’application stricte des r√®gles sur les demandes reconventionnelles et la r√©union d’actions. Cet article n’a pas pour effet de conf√©rer au droit d’intenter un recours collectif le caract√®re d’une r√®gle d’ordre public √† laquelle on ne saurait renoncer. En outre, la r√©cente d√©cision de notre Cour dans Bisaillon reconna√ģt clairement que le recours collectif, malgr√© son importante port√©e sociale, n’est qu’un « v√©hicule proc√©dural dont l’emploi ne modifie ni ne cr√©e des droits substantiels », auquel on peut g√©n√©ralement renoncer (par. 17). C’est au l√©gislateur, et non aux tribunaux, qu’il appartient de cr√©er des exceptions √† cette r√®gle.

(4) La convention d’arbitrage est elle nulle parce que M. Dumoulin n’y a pas consenti puisqu’elle lui a √©t√© impos√©e dans le cadre d’un contrat d’adh√©sion?

227 Les intim√©s soutiennent √©galement que le principe de l’autonomie de la volont√© des parties n’a aucune application en l’esp√®ce puisque la clause d’arbitrage figure dans un contrat d’adh√©sion. Autrement dit, les intim√©s semblent pr√©tendre que M. Dumoulin ne devrait pas √™tre li√© par la convention d’arbitrage puisqu’il n’a pas r√©ellement consenti au contrat qui la renferme, s’agissant d’un contrat d’adh√©sion. Cet argument doit aussi √™tre rejet√©. Il repose sur la fausse hypoth√®se qu’un adh√©rent ne consent pas vraiment √† √™tre assujetti aux obligations √©nonc√©es dans un contrat d’adh√©sion. La notion de contrat d’adh√©sion ne vise qu’√† d√©crire le contrat dans lequel les stipulations essentielles ont √©t√© impos√©es ou r√©dig√©es par l’une des parties et ne pouvaient pas √™tre librement discut√©es (voir l’art. 1379 C.c.Q.). Cela ne signifie pas que l’adh√©rent ne peut pas consentir v√©ritablement au contrat et √™tre li√© par chacune de ses clauses, m√™me si certaines d’entre elles pourraient √™tre nulles ou sans effet par l’application de quelque autre disposition de la loi. Comme l’ont √©crit J. L. Baudouin et P. G. Jobin :

Puisque l’adh√©rent n’a d’autre choix que de contracter, aux termes impos√©s par l’autre partie, ou de ne pas contracter, la question se pose de savoir si on est en pr√©sence d’un v√©ritable contrat, accord des volont√©s des parties. Ainsi, certains soutiennent que le contrat d’adh√©sion se rapproche plut√īt de l’acte juridique unilat√©ral, le contrat √©tant au contraire un acte juridique bilat√©ral. La doctrine majoritaire est plut√īt d’avis que, bien que le r√īle de la volont√© de l’adh√©rent soit r√©duit au minimum, c’est un v√©ritable contrat. Cette analyse est d’autant plus d√©fendable que le droit, par divers moyens, s’efforce de corriger les in√©quit√©s et les probl√®mes de consentement d√©coulant de l’incapacit√© de n√©gocier de l’adh√©rent . . . [En italique dans l’original.]

(Baudouin et Jobin : Les obligations (6e éd. 2005), p. 79)

228 Nous souscrivons √† la th√®se d√©fendue par la majorit√© des auteurs et croyons qu’il n’est donc pas suffisant pour les intim√©s de soulever le fait que la clause d’arbitrage se trouve dans un contrat d’adh√©sion pour d√©montrer que M. Dumoulin ne devrait pas √™tre li√© par elle. Ils doivent s’appuyer sur d’autres r√®gles de droit.

(5) La clause d’arbitrage est elle nulle parce qu’elle serait abusive?

229 L’article 1437 C.c.Q. et l’art. 8 L.p.c. servent de fondement √† un jugement d√©claratoire portant nullit√© d’une clause abusive. Or, comme nous l’avons dit, √† notre avis, une clause d’arbitrage ne saurait √™tre abusive uniquement parce qu’elle se trouve dans un contrat de consommation ou dans un contrat d’adh√©sion. La convention d’arbitrage d’un litige de consommation n’est pas fonci√®rement in√©quitable et abusive pour le consommateur. Au contraire, elle peut tr√®s bien lui faciliter l’acc√®s √† la justice. Par cons√©quent, le consommateur qui soul√®ve ce motif de nullit√© doit prouver que, compte tenu des faits particuliers en cause, la convention d’arbitrage devrait √™tre jug√©e abusive. La plupart du temps, il aura besoin pour ce faire d’une preuve testimoniale. Le cas √©ch√©ant, la question devra √™tre d√©battue devant le tribunal d’arbitrage, mais la d√©cision de ce dernier pourra √™tre r√©vis√©e, √† la demande du consommateur, en application de l’art. 943.1 C.p.c. C’est ce qui serait arriv√© en l’esp√®ce, n’eut √©t√© notre conclusion quant √† l’applicabilit√© de l’art. 3149 C.c.Q.

(6) La convention d’arbitrage est elle nulle parce qu’elle constitue une clause externe qui n’a pas √©t√© port√©e express√©ment √† la connaissance de M. Dumoulin?

230 De fa√ßon g√©n√©rale, il vaut mieux laisser au tribunal d’arbitrage le soin de d√©terminer si la convention d’arbitrage est nulle en application de l’art. 1435, al. 2 C.c.Q. M√™me si, bien souvent, le tribunal pourra d√©terminer, apr√®s examen des documents produits √† l’appui de la demande de renvoi, si la convention d’arbitrage faisait partie d’une clause externe, il ne lui sera g√©n√©ralement pas possible de d√©terminer, lors d’un tel examen, si cette clause externe a √©t√© port√©e express√©ment √† la connaissance du consommateur ou de l’adh√©rent, ou si le consommateur ou l’adh√©rent en a eu autrement connaissance. Pour cette raison, il sera souvent n√©cessaire d’examiner la preuve, y compris la preuve testimoniale, et c’est au tribunal d’arbitrage qu’il vaut mieux confier cet examen. C’est ce qui serait arriv√© en l’esp√®ce, n’eut √©t√© notre conclusion quant √† l’applicabilit√© de l’art. 3149 C.C.Q. in fine.

231 Cela dit, la conclusion de la Cour d’appel suivant laquelle la clause d’arbitrage est externe parce que les conditions du contrat sont externes est importante, compte tenu du nombre croissant de contrats conclus en ligne et des r√©percussions que cette conclusion pourrait avoir sur le commerce √©lectronique. Comme la position retenue par la Cour d’appel n’est pas sans soulever certains doutes, nous estimons devoir exprimer notre point de vue sur la question.

232 Le contexte du commerce √©lectronique exige des tribunaux qu’ils tiennent compte d’un certain nombre de consid√©rations. Premi√®rement, il s’agit d’un moyen de faire du commerce qui diff√®re de tout ce que les tribunaux ont g√©n√©ralement √©t√© appel√©s √† examiner jusqu’√† pr√©sent, un moyen o√Ļ la terminologie et les concepts doivent s’inscrire dans l’ensemble des r√®gles de droit des contrats, malgr√© les difficult√©s de cette harmonisation. Deuxi√®mement, comme le commerce √©lectronique s’implante de plus en plus solidement dans notre soci√©t√©, les tribunaux doivent songer √† favoriser l’objectif de la s√©curit√© commerciale (voir Rudder c. Microsoft Corp. (1999), 2 C.P.R. (4th) 474 (C.S.J. Ont.)). Enfin, le contexte requiert que l’on pr√™te aux personnes qui d√©cident de se lancer dans le commerce √©lectronique une certaine comp√©tence informatique. Comme l’a dit la Cour sup√©rieure de justice de l’Ontario dans Kanitz c. Rogers Cable Inc. (2002), 58 O.R. (3d) 299 :

[TRADUCTION] Nous sommes ici en pr√©sence de gens qui souhaitent se pr√©valoir d’un environnement √©lectronique et des services √©lectroniques auxquels cet environnement leur donne acc√®s. Il ne para√ģt pas d√©raisonnable que les attributs juridiques du rapport qui s’√©tablit entre ceux qui cherchent un acc√®s √©lectronique √† toute une gamme de biens, de services et de produits, ainsi qu’√† l’information, √† la communication, au divertissement et √† d’autres ressources, et l’entit√© qui leur fournit cet acc√®s √©lectronique, soient d√©finis et leur soient communiqu√©s sous forme √©lectronique. [par. 32]

233 √Ä titre pr√©liminaire, l’appelante a soulev√© l’objection selon laquelle la Cour d’appel a tir√© ses propres conclusions de fait en examinant les transcriptions et le dossier d’appel en vue de conclure √† l’application de l’art. 1435 C.c.Q. L’appelante soutient que la Cour d’appel a eu tort de ne pas renvoyer l’affaire √† l’instance inf√©rieure pour que celle ci tire les conclusions qui s’imposent au regard de la preuve puisque la Cour sup√©rieure n’a tir√© aucune conclusion de fait sur cette question. Cet argument doit √™tre rejet√©. Le pouvoir de la Cour d’appel de proc√©der √† une nouvelle appr√©ciation des faits au vu du dossier et √† une substitution de verdict peut √™tre inf√©r√© de l’art. 10 de la Loi sur les tribunaux judiciaires, L.R.Q., ch. T 16, qui pr√©voit que la comp√©tence accord√©e √† la cour pour entendre les appels « comporte l’attribution de tous les pouvoirs n√©cessaires pour lui donner effet » (voir aussi R. P. Kerans, Standards of Review Employed by Appellate Courts (1994), p. 201).

234 Nous abordons maintenant la question de savoir si l’art. 1435 C.c.Q. s’appliquait en l’esp√®ce. L’article 1435 C.c.Q. pr√©cise que la clause externe est g√©n√©ralement autoris√©e, sauf dans les cas de contrat d’adh√©sion ou de consommation o√Ļ, pour que l’on conclue √† sa validit√©, il faut prouver qu’elle a √©t√© port√©e √† la connaissance de la partie ou que le consommateur ou l’adh√©rent en avait par ailleurs connaissance. Ainsi, la premi√®re question est de d√©terminer si les conditions de vente √©tablies par Dell, reli√©es par hyperlien au bas de la page de configuration et contenant la clause d’arbitrage, constituent un document externe.

235 Le sens du mot « externe » n’est pas pr√©cis√© dans le C.c.Q.; cependant, la doctrine et la jurisprudence qu√©b√©coises nous renseignent √† ce sujet. Baudouin et Jobin en donnent une d√©finition, mais expriment leur ambivalence quant √† savoir si, en g√©n√©ral, les documents reli√©s par hyperlien sont des documents externes au sens de l’art. 1435 C.c.Q. :

[La clause externe est] une stipulation figurant dans un document distinct de la convention ou de l’instrumentum mais qui, selon une clause de cette convention, est r√©put√©e en faire partie int√©grante, et donc lier les parties [. . .] Dans les contrats conclus par internet, la partie contractante doit utiliser un ou quelques liens hypertextes pour trouver les clauses externes r√©gissant le contrat qui appara√ģt √† l’√©cran : on peut se demander s’il s’agit effectivement de clauses externes. La notion de clause externe m√©rite d’√™tre quelque peu pr√©cis√©e. Ainsi, le document annex√© au contrat et remis imm√©diatement √† chaque partie et la stipulation inscrite au verso de l’instrumentum ne constituent pas des clauses externes. [Renvois omis.]
(Baudouin et Jobin : Les obligations, p. 267)

236 Les observations de l’appelante vont dans le m√™me sens, faisant une analogie entre l’action de cliquer sur l’hyperlien d’une page Web et celle de tourner la page d’un contrat sur support papier. Bien que cet argument puisse avoir quelque fondement, il fait abstraction du fait qu’une page Web peut comporter plusieurs hyperliens et que ceux ci peuvent cacher le lien qui m√®ne √† des renseignements importants sur les droits du consommateur.

237 Un commentaire de S. Parisien permet de mieux comprendre quand on peut consid√©rer qu’un document reli√© par hyperlien a √©t√© express√©ment port√© √† la connaissance du consommateur au moment de la formation du contrat : « [u]n lien hypertexte vers le document incorpor√© par r√©f√©rence devrait satisfaire √† cette condition s’il est fonctionnel et √©vident » (« La protection accord√©e aux consommateurs et le commerce √©lectronique », dans D. Poulin et autres, dir., Guide juridique du commer√ßant √©lectronique (2003), p. 178). Voil√† une fa√ßon raisonnable d’aborder la question; cette solution est plus r√©aliste qu’une conclusion g√©n√©rale voulant que les documents li√©s par hyperlien soient toujours, ou jamais, externes. Si on l’applique aux faits de l’esp√®ce, il s’agit de d√©terminer si, par son emplacement et sa visibilit√© sur la page Web, l’hyperlien en cause est cach√© √† tel point qu’on peut affirmer √† juste titre qu’il est externe.

238 Il est vrai, comme l’a dit la Cour d’appel, que l’hyperlien menant aux conditions de la vente √©tait en petits caract√®res en plus d’√™tre situ√© au bas de la page de configuration. La preuve a d√©montr√© que Dell place un hyperlien menant aux conditions de vente au bas de chacune des pages de magasinage de son site, se conformant ainsi aux normes de l’industrie. De fait, c’est cet endroit que recommandait √† l’√©poque le Bureau de la consommation d’Industrie Canada (Votre commerce dans Internet : Gagner la confiance des consommateurs — Un guide pour la protection des consommateurs √† l’intention des commerces en direct (1999), p. 10). On peut donc supposer que les consommateurs qui se livraient alors au commerce √©lectronique se seraient attendus √† trouver les conditions de vente de l’entreprise au bas de la page Web. √Ä la lumi√®re de ce qui pr√©c√®de, nous concluons que l’hyperlien vers les conditions de vente √©tait √©vident pour M. Dumoulin. De plus, la page de configuration contenait un avis selon lequel la vente √©tait assujettie aux conditions de vente, accessibles par hyperlien, les portant ainsi express√©ment √† la connaissance de M. Dumoulin.

239 Un simple clic sur l’hyperlien fait appara√ģtre le premier paragraphe qui indique ce qui suit, en lettres majuscules :

VEUILLEZ LIRE LE PR√ČSENT DOCUMENT ATTENTIVEMENT! IL RENFERME DES RENSEIGNEMENTS TR√ąS IMPORTANTS SUR VOS DROITS ET VOS OBLIGATIONS, AINSI QUE LES LIMITES ET LES EXCLUSIONS QUI PEUVENT S’APPLIQUER √Ä VOTRE √ČGARD. LE PR√ČSENT DOCUMENT RENFERME UNE CLAUSE DE R√ąGLEMENT DE CONFLITS.

La pr√©sente convention renferme les modalit√©s qui s’appliquent aux achats que vous faites aupr√®s de Dell Computer Corporation, soci√©t√© canadienne (« Dell », « notre », « nos » ou « nous ») qui vous (le « client ») seront remises avec des commandes de syst√®mes informatiques et (ou) d’autres produits et (ou) services et soutien vendus au Canada. S’il accepte la livraison des syst√®mes informatiques, des autres produits et (ou) services et soutien d√©crits dans la facture, le client consent √† √™tre li√© par ces modalit√©s et les accepte.
(Dossier de l’appelante, vol. III, p. 375)

240 D’entr√©e de jeu, cet avertissement porte directement √† la connaissance du lecteur l’existence de la clause de r√®glement des conflits; le lecteur n’a plus qu’√† d√©rouler le texte pour trouver la clause 13C, o√Ļ figure la clause d’arbitrage pour acc√©der facilement √† tous les renseignements dont il a besoin au sujet du d√©roulement de la proc√©dure d’arbitrage. Pour ce motif, nous rejetons l’argument selon lequel la clause d’arbitrage √©tait masqu√©e ou cach√©e dans les conditions de la vente. Nous adoptons le raisonnement tenu dans Kanitz c. Rogers Cable, au par. 31, au sujet d’une convention d’arbitrage tr√®s semblable figurant dans un contrat type :

[TRADUCTION] [La clause d’arbitrage] est pr√©sent√©e comme toutes les autres clauses de la convention sont pr√©sent√©es. Elle ne fait pas partie d’une disposition plus longue traitant d’autres sujets; elle n’est pas non plus √©crite en petits caract√®res ni autrement plac√©e dans un endroit obscur que seule une d√©termination in√©branlable peut amener √† d√©couvrir. La clause est bien en vue et facilement rep√©rable par quiconque souhaite prendre le temps de d√©rouler le document, ne serait ce que pour en examiner bri√®vement le contenu. La clause d’arbitrage ne saurait donc √™tre assimil√©e √† la clause en petits caract√®res figurant √† l’endos du contrat de location de voiture de l’affaire Tilden ou √† l’endos du billet de baseball de l’affaire Blue Jays.

241 La juge Lemelin a conclu que le fait que le C.p.c. r√©gissant le processus d’arbitrage n’√©tait accessible que par un site Web externe √©tait important. Or, ce qui importe, c’est de savoir si la clause d’arbitrage elle m√™me, et non le C.p.c., √©tait √©vidente et accessible √† m√™me les conditions de vente.

V. Dispositif

242 Pour ces motifs, nous sommes d’avis de rejeter le pourvoi, avec d√©pens.

Pourvoi accueilli avec dépens, les juges BASTARACHE, LEBEL et FISH sont dissidents.